Volume 51, Issue 1 June 2017

Volume 51, Issue 1
June 2017

dirty south issue

 

James A. Crank is an assistant professor of American literature and culture at the University of Alabama. Author of the forthcoming Understanding Randall Kenan, as well as Understanding Sam Shepard and editor of New Approaches To Gone With The Wind, he is currently editing a collection of James Agee’s short fiction.

Each day I go to work at the University of Alabama I sit in my office in Morgan Hall, the home of the English Department; Morgan Hall is named after Alabama senator John Tyler Morgan. On a plaque inside the building, we learn that Morgan Hall was dedicated to JTM “for his high character and great qualities of head and heart.” The plaque also notes that Morgan was instrumental in the university’s growth throughout the late nineteenth century.

John Tyler Morgan was also instrumental in promoting southern exceptionalism, arguing for “states’ rights,” advocating for enslavement, secession, segregation, and white supremacy, as well as encouraging the forced migration of African Americans out of the US South. He was a confederate general during the Civil War, and later was rumored to be James Clanton’s replacement as grand dragon of Alabama’s chapter of the Ku Klux Klan in 1871. Every day, a significant percentage of the university’s students of color walk through the doors of Morgan Hall and past a marker that celebrates the achievements of a man who quite literally worked to silence, oppress, disenfranchise, and later, segregate, isolate, and expel them from white southerners.

Last February, a group of students began a petition to have the name of the building changed. That petition was never answered. Today, as I write this article, I read about violent protests and fears over what will happen as New Orleans begins to remove its confederate monuments. I see the torch mob in Charlottesville and the call to arms that is implicit in every policy decision of our new administration. At my graduate university in Chapel Hill, there still stands the state of a solider—they call him “Silent Sam”—who memorializes the lives of those confederate students and alumni who lost their life in the Civil War. He is still standing now in 2017. Still standing. His silence is deafening.

This bullshit must stop. No more decoration day for confederate graves. No more sprucing up the statues and monuments that celebrate fantasies of whiteness. Let’s tear them down—all of them. Smash them up, burn them with fire, or let’s let them languish on the ground, overthrown, deep in the mud, stuck in their muck, deep in their dirt.

Southern studies folk must be the first voices to say “No.”

No to the confederacy (how is this STILL a debate?).

No to the monuments that encourage silences.

No to the “heritage-not-hate” rhetoric that further seeks to oppress through its negotiation of history.

No to all those who use symbols and words to sow fear and hatred, or entrench their power.

Instead, scholars of southern studies must embrace the complicated, messy and rich tapestry of what the South is, not the monolithic and dead-circle propaganda it continues to manufacture and promote. We must embrace the contradictions, people, and iterations of what the study of the South might yield for American cultural/literary studies, and by owning our dirt, we reframe it.

This issue includes an interview with one such voice talking back to disrupt the narrative of southern memorialization, just one of a new group of southern scholars whose work articulates the dissonances and complexity of the southern experience. I’m honored to have Regina Bradley as my co-pilot here in this issue; to clap back at the plaques and monuments that ask us to celebrate their story, to promote their history, to work through their simple framework. We got other stories to tell, and, yeah, it’s messy, and sure, we will probably get muddy, but that’s how we work in the dirty south.

 

President’s Column

Happy summer to all. I hope and trust that the end of the academic year finds you well.

I want to dedicate this President’s Column to a preview of our biennial conference, which, thankfully, will not be called “SSSL-Con 2018.” (#regionalhumor) After a hugely successful 2016 conference at Boston University, we will reconvene 15-18 February 2018 at the University of Texas at Austin.

Our theme is “South By and By,” a playful nod to the future of the Society, as well as the increasingly diverse literatures we study. As the call-for-papers suggests, we will use the occasion of our 50th anniversary to reflect on the past and future of southern literary studies. In turn, our venue will encourage discussion of the ways the South functions in relation to a host of other regional, national, and international entities and identities. Not just “South by Southwest” but also South vis-à-vis Greater Mexico, the Gulf Coast, and beyond.

Let me highlight an important change in practice: In order to make the conference a bit less breakneck, we have extended the program. We will open with a plenary session and reception on Thursday evening, 15 February, and conclude with a final plenary on Sunday afternoon, 18 February. President’s Day is that Monday, so we hope that most of you will be able to stick around for the duration.

The program will be anchored by four plenary sessions and not one but two receptions. We are largely eschewing keynote lectures in favor of plenary roundtables. This will allow us to hear more voices, particularly those of scholars working in adjacent fields like African American, Mexican American/Latina/o/x, Native and Indigenous, Asian American, and LGBTQ studies. As for the receptions, Austin is nothing if not convivial.

UT-Austin is offering extraordinary support for the conference. In addition to the Department of English and the College of Liberal Arts, we have secured co-sponsorships from a number of other units. For instance, the Harry Ransom Center—which, as many of you know, has extraordinary holdings in southern literature—will host one of our receptions and welcome SSSL participants into their reading room. Indeed, we are planning a special collections workshop at the Ransom Center on Friday morning, 16 February.

All of our sessions will take place on campus, which is within walking distance of many of Austin’s best attractions, bars, restaurants, and shops. Our hotel blocks are located just off campus, and Central Texas tends to be quite pleasant in February. What fun we’ll have…

Without further ado, here is the call for papers:

~~

Society for the Study of Southern Literature

Biennial Conference

Austin, Texas

15-18 February 2018

South By and By

 The Society for the Study of Southern Literature will mark its 50th anniversary in 2018 with a biennial conference, “South By and By,” at the University of Texas at Austin. With its proximity to a number of borders—including the U.S-Mexico border and the border between South and Southwest—Austin is an ideal location for a conference dedicated to rethinking the shape of southern literary studies in the twenty-first century. In addition to marking where SSSL has been, we will survey the current state of the field and discuss a number of possible futures. As importantly, the conference will emphasize the increasingly diverse literatures we study, as well as our fundamental connection to adjacent fields of inquiry. We welcome scholarship on any aspect or configuration of southern literature and culture, especially scholarship that considers its multiple and often messy connections to other literatures and cultures. As a result, we are especially interested in having scholars join us who may not identify primarily as “southernists.” And, as always, we actively encourage the work of younger scholars, who can take advantage of SSSL’s robust Emerging Scholars Organization and travel grant program.

Possible topics:

  • The future and past of southern literary studies
  • The relationship between southern studies and African American, Mexican American/Latina/o/x, Native and Indigenous, Asian American, and LGBTQ studies
  • Southern exceptionalism and its discontents
  • South by Southwest, Northwest, Midwest, and/or Northeast literary studies
  • Southern literature and culture in the world
  • Southern and post-southern imaginaries in literature, film, and other media

Additional information about the conference and Society is available on our website: www.southernlit.org

We welcome proposals for individual papers (~300 words) or prearranged panels and roundtables (~500 words). We also invite calls for papers for panels, which we will gladly post on the SSSL website and Facebook page. Proposals should include ~100 word biographies for each participant. Please direct all questions to Coleman Hutchison at sssl2018austin@gmail.com.

Deadline for proposals is September 15, 2017.

See you in Austin come February….

Cole

 

Emerging Scholars Organization

(ESO) Update

The executive council of the Emerging Scholars Organization is in the process of working on several initiatives: Spotlight on Southernist Scholars, website bibliographies, and the Mentorship Program. In addition, we are hard at work developing professionalizing, scholarly, and social events at both SAMLA 2017 and SSSL 2018.

Currently, we have reached out to several scholars to expand the spotlight initiative. We are pleased to announce that our first interview, with Riché Richardson, is now available to view on our website. Scholars, emerging and established alike, will find Dr. Richardson’s contribution insightful, as she takes the temperature of the field with rigor, while the passion and enthusiasm she derives from her scholarship proves inspiring, indeed. We will continue to post more interviews as our respondents’ commentary comes in.

We are also in the process of expanding our bibliographies initiative of significant work in selected fields of the southern studies universe. Currently, our site hosts six bibliographies: African American studies, Appalachian studies, disability studies, ecocriticism, gender, women’s and sexuality studies, and postsouthern studies. In this next round of additions, we are adding bibliographies in Gulf South studies, Native southern studies, and nineteenth-century southern studies. If you would like to recommend compelling texts for one or more these bibliographies , please direct messages to the following bibliography editors: For Gulf South studies, please email titles and authors to Jennie Lightweis-Goff (jlg@olemiss.edu). For Native southern studies, please email titles and authors to Stephanie Rountree (srountree.phd@gmail.com). For nineteenth-century southern studies, please email titles and authors to Jill Fennell (jfennel3@vols.utk.edu). Our bibliographies are living documents, subject to revision and interrogation from the entire SSSL community of emerging and established scholars, alike. We welcome you to email suggestions, additions, and/or feedback on all bibliographies (both published and forthcoming) to emergingscholarsorg@gmail.com.

Heather Fox has been working to expand our mentorship program, which currently includes 24 mentors and 32 mentees.The mentorship program partners mentors and mentees based on research interests and suggests that they communicate regularly, via phone, Skype, email, and/or conferences. However, specific commitments remain up to individual mentors and mentees. For mentors, the most common requests from mentees generally involve publishing, funding and job opportunities, and more general questions about the state of the field. For mentees, this program is open to any SSSL member who identifies as an emerging scholar. If you would like to join the mentoring program either as a mentor or emerging scholar, please send an email with a brief description of your research interests to Heather Fox at emergingscholarsorg@gmail.com. Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis and reminders will be distributed via the SSSL listserv and Facebook page. We also regularly plan social events for mentors and mentees at various conferences, so be sure to look for our schedule at such upcoming events as ALA’s Regional Symposium in New Orleans, SAMLA in Atlanta, MLA in New York, and SSSL in Austin.

The ESO is looking forward to two upcoming conferences: ALA’s Regional Symposium in New Orleans (Sept 7-9) and   SAMLA’s 89th conference in Atlanta (November 3-5). At ALA, we will be organizing a Southernist Social for new and established scholars (details forthcoming). At SAMLA, we will be hosting two panels: one on the Urban South and the other on the Pop South. You can view the CFPs for these panels on SAMLA’s website. We hope that these panels produce robust conversations and innovative conceptions of southern critique. In addition to these panels, the ESO will hold its regular business meeting, and we encourage all members to attend. ESO will also be hosting a Southernist Social, place and time to be announced at a later time.

In addition to these projects, the ESO is in the process of designing professionalization roundtables, scholarly and pedagogical panels, and an information meeting for the 2018 SSSL in Austin (February 15-18). We are also in the process of transitioning our Facebook presence to the group “Emerging Scholars Organization, SSSL” in an effort to facilitate communications among ESO members and between ESO members and the executive council. If you have comments or suggestions for us, please reach out.

We look forward to connecting with you.

 

Interview with Dr. Regina N. Bradley:

Dr. Bradley is an Assistant Professor of English and African Diaspora Studies at Kennesaw State University. She is also the author of Boondock Kollage: Stories from the Hip Hop South (Peter Lang Press), and the founder of the Outkasted Conversations Project.


Photo Credit: BCKYRD Photography

You’ve just finished a class this semester that focused on OutKast—can you talk about the run of that course and the work your students did in exploring that album?

Absolutely! The course was an upper level English course that asked the question of how OutKast’s body of work influenced articulations of contemporary southern blackness or what I theorize as “the Hip Hop South.” Aside from daily critical listening activities, we used each album to foreground our analysis of literature and popular culture. For example, we paired their Aquemini album with Kiese Laymon’s novel Long Division to explore how Laymon borrows from OutKast’s trope of storytelling to answer questions of black agency and realities in post-Civil Rights Mississippi. We also explored Jesmyn Ward’s first novel Where the Line Bleeds as a “trap novel” and paired it with a trap music playlist that included Mista, T.I., UGK, 3 6 Mafia, Backbone, and others. Ultimately, I wanted students to understand that there is such a thing as contemporary southern black culture and life and that the (black) South does move on after 1968.

Dre famously told the SOURCE audience in 1995, “The South’s got something to say.” Do you find your scholarly voice talking back to other voices (scholars, investors, producers, academics) that want to control the definition of what “the South” is?

Chile. Hell yeah. There are gatekeepers of what is and what ain’t southern and they are using outdated models of southern black culture and life to help keep the gate locked good and tight. I’m extremely fascinated by the discomfort that a young black South renders for, well, a little bit of everybody: southern studies scholars, older generations of black and white southerners, nonsoutherners, etc. I have had to hold my tongue and roll my eyes on more than occasion when addressing why my work does not center Faulkner or Flannery O’Connor or somebody else who is white as a reference point for how I am thinking about black folks in the south. First, why would I use authors speaking about a Jim Crow South in a Post-Civil Rights Era? As I said in my TEDx talk recently, the Jim Crow South ain’t mine. I benefit from the labors of the Movement. I also recognize, however, that I stand in its shadow and that everything was not easily squared away. I constantly grapple with the question of how do I move to the side a little bit to show that Civil Rights rhetoric and Dr. King’s mountaintop ain’t one size fits all?

Additionally, it is intentional that I decentralize a white gaze – both creative and academic – from my work. I refuse to let my research or my experiences be drowned out.

What lessons do southern hip hop artists privilege? How do we learn about the region through the music and culture of dirty South hip hop?

If one wanted to learn about the contemporary history of black folks in the south, hip hop is the means to do that. It’s what I love about southern rap artists – their ability to find a common thread but stay true to their communities, their experiences, and their own sets of triumphs and challenges. When Cool Breeze came up with the term Dirty South in hip hop, I think it means the illicit and explicit narratives that existed outside of sanitized notions of southern black respectability. For example, Goodie Mob’s 1995 debut album Soul Food has a track titled “Dirty South” that speaks about not only how to cope in the contemporary black South as frustrated and working class black men but also that there are still very blatant social-political realities in the contemporary south that older generations would rather overlook   – i.e. political and social-economic corruption and the need for illicit economies like slinging drugs and prostitution – in favor of a romantic narrative of racial progress. Perhaps even more attuned to regionalism in southern rap are the sonic narratives of southern hip hop outside of the lyrics. Each state could be seen as having it’s own sonic hip hop imprint i.e. Chopped-and-Screwed in Texas, Bounce in Louisiana, or Blues infused hip hop coming out of Memphis. Production teams like Organized Noize deserve so much credit for establishing a distinctively southern sound – pulling from the influences of funk, blues, and gospel – and demonstrating that the ‘dirtiness’ of sound in hip hop is equally reflective of the contemporary southern social-cultural landscape.

You work with a lot of cultural texts—what movies, television shows, or other music do you find yourself drawn to, both inside and outside of the classroom?

 Shows like Donald Glover’s Atlanta, the film ATL, and documentaries like The Art of Organized Noize were useful this semester in teaching my OutKast class. It’s been a while since I’ve leisurely engaged new pop culture but there are a few shows and comics that are keeping my attention: the television shows Queen Sugar and Underground and the comic series Harrow County are dope!

 What’s your advice for graduate students or beginning scholars who are just coming to southern studies? Is there something you wish someone had told you at 25, 30 years old?

In hindsight, I wish I would’ve followed my passion about documenting the contemporary Black South earlier. I didn’t turn back home to the South until after my graduate studies. My advice would be find your lane and decorate it for the long haul, even if your vision and approaches don’t fit the mold. Let me be clear: I’m not suggesting to not be grounded and aware of the seminal texts in southern studies or whatever you may be studying. But make sure that you do not lose sight of who you are and your interests in the grind of graduate studies.

Your collection, Boondock Kollage, was recently published by Peter Lang Press. Can you tell us about the process of putting that together?

I am SO excited about my first short story collection! Boondock Kollage started as a morning pages exercise where I was trying to regain my creative writing voice. I started hearing my characters in my head and digging up memories that were the germs for many of the stories in the book. I know I wanted to highlight how black folks were living and thriving and questioning what it meant to be southern and black after the Civil Rights Movement, especially for women and girls. So, I paid homage and took up the challenge of the great Toni Morrison for writing the story I wanted to read. One of the stories, “Beautiful Ones,” haunted me so bad that I now have plans to extend it into a novel.

 What does it mean to be “dirty?” How do we frame our own dirt in our scholarship?

Ultimately, I recognize the term “dirty” in the south to mean messy, complicated, and not easily or neatly boxed into respectable or immediately recognizable categories. We need to separate ourselves from the pristine and easily historicized renderings of southern identities and agencies. If we can do that, we open up space to have more compelling and useful conversations to update how we conceptualize the south in the past, present, and future.

 

CFPs and Announcements

  • Call For Submissions:

At the request of the University of West Virginia Press, Margaret Bauer is compiling and editing a collection of essays on the works of Charles Frazier. Please email abstracts by July 1 to BauerM@ecu.edu. Papers will be due spring 2018.

Call for Submissions for the 2018 issue of the North Carolina Literary Review (NCLR; see www.nclr.ecu.edu),

Featuring North Carolina On the Map and In the News. Complete submissions are due by August 31, 2017

For this section, we would be interested in articles about and interviews with North Carolina authors who have written about North Carolina people, places, events, and movements that have—famously or infamously—shaped the Old North State. Early submissions and proposals are welcome. Queries and proposals for the special feature section may be emailed to the editor, Margaret Bauer (BauerM@ecu.edu). For formatting manuscripts and online submission instructions, please consult our website: www.nclr.ecu.edu/submissions.

work are welcome. By June 7, please email a 200-300 word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Harper Strom, Georgia State University (hstrom@gsu.edu).

  • CFP

Call for Papers on George Saunders’ novel Lincoln in the Bardo (2017)

For a possible panel on the program of the
2017 Gulf South History and Humanities Conference
Pensacola Florida, October 5-7 2017

Here are three ways in which Saunders’ new novel is relevant for the Gulf South conference themes:
• Lincoln in the Bardo is about haunting and what C. Vann Woodward long ago called “the burden of Southern history,” the continuing aftereffects of plantation slavery on both the US and other post-slavery societies, including in the Caribbean
• the novel gives startling new meaning to the conference’s theme of “borderlands” — for in the case of this novel two key borderlands lie not just between the two sides of the Civil War (the novel’s set in the year 1862), but also the borderline between life and death, which turns out to be frequently crossed and haunted
• it reinterprets the importance of Abraham Lincoln to American history, even using the Tibetan Buddhist concept of the Bardo to posit that Lincoln’s being haunted by the ghosts of dead slaves and his recently deceased son Willie influenced his actions after 1862, including his Emancipation Proclamation and Second Inaugural Address

Please email a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a c.v. to
Peter Schmidt by ***July 15 2017****
(deadline for panel proposals for the conference is July 30)
Email: pschmid1@swarthmore.edu
If you have questions about the proposed panel, I will be happy to answer them.

For more information on the Gulf South conference, which will be hosted by the Gulf South Historical Association, see:
https://www.usm.edu/…/gulf-south-history-and-humanities-con…

“The 35th Annual Gulf South History and Humanities Conference, hosted by Pensacola State College, welcomes all researchers and scholars to propose papers on Native Americans on the Gulf South Borderlands, but all topics, panels, roundtables, performances, and workshops, exploring all aspects of the history, ethnography, archaeology, development, and cultures of the Gulf South and Circum-Caribbean are encouraged.”

  • CFP:

The Emerging Scholars Organization of the Society for Study of Southern Literature invites papers on the Pop South — the second of its two panels — for SAMLA, returning home to Atlanta for its annual convention (November 3 – 5, 2017). The Call for Papers follows the triple asterisk.

***

POP SOUTH: CONSUMING THE REGION

The U.S. South is persistently served up for aesthetic consumption: from nineteenth century southwestern humor sketches to the televisual spectacles of Buckwild and Honey Boo-Boo, or in contemporary media from the S-Town podcast to Atlanta’s trap music scene. While the modernisms of Faulkner, Toomer, and O’Connor produced iconic conceptualizations of the South, the Pop South has emerged to complicate those conventions. The Emerging Scholars Organization of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature invites paper proposals that meditate on southern representation, popular culture, and media forms designed for mass consumption. We seek abstracts about southern popular culture and/or southern representations in U.S. or global medias. For this panel, the “Pop” of Pop South can refer to style and tone of multiple media, such as music, television, film, magazine, sketch culture, and popular literature. While all papers should consider the topic of the South and popular media, other intersections might include: ·

* Aesthetics of southern Pop-iness ·
* Commodification of the South via popular media ·
* Representations of the South/southerness in national or global contexts ·
* Stereotypes of the South, and or southern-made stereotypes
* Brandings of the South · Accessibility of southern representations ·
* Popular representations of/in the Global South, Appalachian South, or Circum-Caribbean Souths

We welcome participants inside and outside of southern studies, as well as those who have wideranging conceptions of both “Pop” and “South. Please send 300-word proposals and A/V requirements to emergingscholars@gmail.com by June 16, 2017.

Announcements:

  • Graduate Assistant Position(s) Available: 

An Opportunity to Work on the Staff of the Award-Winning North Carolina Literary Review

The graduate programs at East Carolina University includes the opportunity to apply for an editorial assistantship with the award-winning North Carolina Literary Review (NCLR).

NCLR editorial assistants help with editing the current issue, website development, grant applications, promotional activities, and/or developing a marketing plan. Candidates should have strong writing and proofreading skills and be proficient at using Macintosh computers and Microsoft Word. Desirable additional skills (or interest in learning) Indesign (or other desktop publishing program), web publishing, and grant-writing.

For information about ECU’s graduate program, go to: http://www.ecu.edu/cs-cas/engl/gradindex.cfm.

For more information about this award-winning journal, go to: http://www.nclr.ecu.edu.

Students interested in working with NCLR should contact the editor, Professor Margaret Bauer, via email (BauerM@ecu.edu) for more information.

 

SSSL Bibliography, Summer 2017

Will Murray, Bibliographer and Editorial Assistant for the SSSL Newsletter, is a PhD candidate at the University of Alabama. 

Scholarly Journals:

African American Review

  • Coombs, Adam. “Queer Oedipal Drag in Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song and Baadasssss!.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 1, Spring2017, pp. 41-58.
  • Nikolas, Akash. “Straight Growth and the Imperial Alternative: Queer-Reading Jamaica Kincaid.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 1, Spring2017, pp. 59-73.
  • Ryan, Melissa. “Dangerous Refuge: Richard Wright and the Swimming Hole.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 1, Spring 2017, pp. 27-40.
  • Sigler, Danielle Brune. “Forgotten Manuscripts: Fenton Johnson’s: A Wild Plaint.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 1, Spring 2017, pp. 1-15.

 American Literary History

  • Cohen, Lara Langer. “The Depths of Astonishment: City Mysteries and the Antebellum Underground.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 1, 2017, pp. 1-25.
  • Dillon, Elizabeth Maddock. “Translatio Studiiand the Poetics of the Digital Archive: Early American Literature, Caribbean Assemblages, and Freedom Dreams.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 2, 2017, pp. 248-266.
  • Donofrio, Nicholas. “Multiculturalism, Inc.: Regulating and Deregulating the Culture Industries with Ishmael Reed.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 1, 2017, pp. 100-128.
  • Rusert, Britt. “New World: The Impact of Digitization on the Study of Slavery.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 2, 2017, pp. 267-286.
  • Womack, Autumn. “Visuality, Surveillance, and The Afterlife of Slavery.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 1, 2017, pp. 191-204.

American Literature

  • Bernstein, Robin. “I’m Very Happy to Be in the Reality-Based Community”: Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home.” American Literature, vol. 89, no. 1, Mar. 2017, pp. 121-154.
  • Lloyd Oliphant, Elizabeth. “Marketing the Southwest: Modernism, the Fred Harvey Company, and the Indian Detour.” American Literature, vol. 89, no. 1, Mar. 2017, pp. 91-119.
  • McLaughlin, Don James. “Inventing Queer: Portals, Hauntings, and Other Fantastic Tricks in the Collected Folklore of Joel Chandler Harris and Charles Chesnutt” American Literature, 89, no. 1, Mar. 2017, pp. 1-28.
  • Spingarn, Adena. “Writing the Old Negro in a New Century: James Weldon Johnson and the Uses of Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” American Literature, vol. 89, no. 1, Mar. 2017, pp. 29-56.

Contemporary Literature

  • Darda, Joseph. “The Ethnicization of Veteran America: Larry Heinemann, Toni Morrison, and Military Whiteness after Vietnam.” Contemporary Literature, vol. 57 no. 3, 2016, pp. 410-440.
  • Thorsson, C. “Foodways in Contemporary African American Poetry: Harryette Mullen and Evie Shockley.” Contemporary Literature, vol. 57 no. 2, 2016, pp. 184-215.

 Cormac McCarthy Journal

  • Huebert, David. “Eating and Mourning the Corpse of the World: Ecological Cannibalism and Elegiac Protomourning in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 15 no. 1, 2017, pp. 66-87.
  • Kottage, Robert. “Mysteries of the Meridian Revealed: McCarthy’s Anachronistic Tarot.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 15 no. 1, 2017, pp. 3-29.
  • Pugh, Marie-Reine. ““There is no God and we are his prophets”: The Visionary Potential of Memory and Nostalgia in Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Menand The Road.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 15 no. 1, 2017, pp. 46-65.
  • Robison, John Mark. “The Authority of Currency in Cormac McCarthy’s: Blood Meridian.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 15 no. 1, 2017, pp. 30-45.

Early American Literature

  • Allewaert, Monique. “Insect Poetics: James Grainger, Personification, and Enlightenments Not Taken.” Early American Literature, vol. 52 no. 2, 2017, pp. 299-332.
  • Altschuler, Sari. & Silva, Cristobal. “Early American Disability Studies.” Early American Literature, vol. 52 no. 1, 2017, pp. 1-27.

Edgar Allan Poe Review

  • Boccio, Rachel. ““The Things and Thoughts of Time”: Spatiotemporal Forms of the Transcendent Sublime in “The Fall of the House of Usher”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 1, 2017, pp. 54-72.
  • Hussein Ali, Zahra. A. “Toward Epistemic Competence: Poe’s Philosophical Discourse in “Some Words with a Mummy”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 1, 2017, pp. 15-38.
  • Savoye, Jeffrey A. “Dating “Eulalie”: A Reevaluation of Poe’s Manuscripts.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 1, 2017, pp. 1-14.
  • Toikkanen, Jarkko. “Auditory Images in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 1, 2017, pp. 39-53.

Faulkner Journal

  • Caron, James E. “Emerson’s Sublime Pastoralism, Parody, and Second Sight in Faulkner’s as I Lay Dying.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 71-99.
  • Hannon, Charles. “The Function of Function Words in William Faulkner’s as I Lay Dying.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 3-21.
  • O’Brien, Timothy. “Who Arose for Emily?.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 101-109.
  • Staebler, Cliff. “Jethro Tull’s Protégée: Vernon Tull’s Helping Hand and the Equine Dialectic.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 23-47.
  • Wilson, Kevin G. “Crisis, Mimetic Desire, and Communal Violence in William Faulkner’s Sanctuary.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 49-69.

Global South

  • Leithauser, Emily. “Traveling Figures and Figures of Travel in “The Arkansas Testament”: Derek Walcott’s Quarrel with the American South.” The Global South, vol. 10 no. 1, 2016, pp. 85-106.

 Journal of African American Studies

  • Sowers, Brian. “The Socratic Black Panther: Reading Huey P. Newton Reading Plato.” Journal of African American Studies, vol. 21, no. 1, Mar. 2017, pp. 26-41.

 Journal of American Studies

  • Arnold-Forster, Tom. “Dr. Billy Taylor, “America’s Classical Music,” and the Role of the Jazz Ambassador.” Journal of American Studies, vol. 51, no. 1, Feb. 2017, pp. 117-139.
  • Brown, Holly Cade. “Figuring Giorgio Agamben’s “Bare Life” in the Post-Katrina Works of Jesmyn Ward and Kara Walker.” Journal of American Studies, vol. 51, no. 1, Feb. 2017, pp. 1-19.
  • Currell, Sue. “You Haven’t Seen Their Faces: Eugenic National Housekeeping and Documentary Photography in 1930s America.” Journal of American Studies, vol. 51, no. 2, 2017, pp. 481–511.
  • Brown, Thomas J. “Monuments and Ruins: Atlanta and Columbia Remember Sherman.” Journal of American Studies, vol. 51, no. 2, 2017, pp. 411–436.
  • Woods, Michael E. “Interdisciplinary Studies of the Civil War Era: Recent Trends and Future Prospects.” Journal of American Studies, vol. 51, no. 2, 2017, pp. 349–383.

Journal of Popular Culture

  • Ferguson, Josh-Wade. “‘Traded It off for That Voodoo Thing’: Cultural Capital and Vernacular Debt in Disney’s Representation of New Orleans.” Journal of Popular Culture, no. 6, 2016 pp. 1224–1240

MELUS

  • Dietrich, Lucas. “Charles W. Chesnutt, Houghton Mifflin, and the Racial Paratext.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 41 no. 4, 2016, pp. 166-195.
  • Fama, Katherine A. “The Single Architecture of Contending Forces:Lodging Independent Women in Pauline E. Hopkins’s “Little Romance”.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 41 no. 4, 2016, pp. 196-221.
  • Goldberg, Jesse A. “Slavery’s Ghosts and the Haunted Housing Crisis: On Narrative Economy and Circum-Atlantic Memory in Toni Morrison’s A Mercy.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 41 no. 4, 2016, pp. 116-139.
  • Leader-Picone, Cameron. “An Unhyphenated Man: Alice Randall’s Rebel Yelland the Literary Age of Obama.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 42 no. 1, 2017, pp. 53-73.
  • Montgomery, Christine. “Pendulum Time, Collective Freedom, and Rethinking the Neo-Slave Narrative in Arna Bontemps’s Black Thunder:Gabriel’s Revolt: Virginia, 1800.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 41 no. 4, 2016, pp. 140-165.
  • Mossner, Alexa Weik. “Feeling Cosmopolitan: Strategic Empathy in Charles W. Chesnutt’s Paul Marchand, F.M.C..” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 41 no. 4, 2016, pp. 76-95.
  • O’Malley, Lurana Donnels. “The Witch of Endor Slept Here: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Crisis of the George Washington Bicentenary.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 41 no. 4, 2016, pp. 32-54.
  • Owens, Imani. D. ““Hard Reading”: US Empire and Black Modernist Aesthetics in Eric Walrond’s Tropic Death.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 41 no. 4, 2016, pp. 96-115.
  • Wall, Joshua Logan. “Sound and Fury: Accent and Identity in Faulkner’s Immigration Novel.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 42 no. 1, 2017, pp. 94-115.

 Modern Fiction Studies

  • Houser, Heather. “Knowledge Work and the Commons in Barbara Kingsolver’s and Ann Pancake’s Appalachia.” MFS Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 63 no. 1, 2017, pp. 95-115.
  • Rapaport, Herman. “Fantasies of Settlement: Heidegger, Tocqueville, Fichte, Faulkner.” MFS Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 63 no. 1, 2017, pp. 9-28.
  • Stone, Jordan. R. “Watching Time: Madison Smartt Bell’s All Souls’ Rising, Narrative, Historiography, and the Contemporary Historical Novel.” MFS Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 63 no. 1, 2017, pp. 116-145.

 Poe Studies

  • Ashworth, Suzanne. “Experimental Matter, Unclaimed Death, and Posthumous Futures in Poe’s “Valdemar”.” Poe Studies, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 52-79.
  • Dahlkvist, Tobias. ““Alcoholic and Epileptic Nightmares”: Cesare Lombroso, Poe, and the Pathology of Genius.” Poe Studies, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 99-125.
  • Jones, Paul Christian. ““Nevermore!”: Non-Normative Desire and Queer Temporality in Poe’s “The Raven”.” Poe Studies, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 80-98.

 Southern Cultures

  • Creadick, Anna. “Banjo Boy: Masculinity, Disability, and Difference in Deliverance.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 1, 2017, pp. 63-78.
  • Garringer, Rachel. “”Well, We’re Fabulous and We’re Appalachians, So We’re Fabulachians”: Country Queers in Central Appalachia.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 1, 2017, pp. 79-91.
  • Hale, Grace Elizabeth. “Documentary Noise: The Soundscape of Barbara Kopple’s Harlan County, U.S.A.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 1, 2017, pp. 10-32.
  • Hoppe, Graham. “Icon and Identity: Dolly Parton’s Hillbilly Appeal.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 1, 2017, pp. 49-62.
  • Lewis, Jolie. “Pearl S. Buck, It’s Not You, It’s Me.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 1, 2017, pp. 114-122.
  • Waters, Darin J. & Hyde, G. & Betsalel, K. “In-Between the Color Lines with a Spy Camera: The Appalachian Urban Folk Photography of Isaiah Rice.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 1, 2017, pp. 92-113.

 Southern Quarterly

  • Adams, Henry. “Thomas Hart Benton and the South.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 2, 2017, pp. 71-89.
  • Favorite, Malaika. “A Memory Painting—My Southern Family.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 2, 2017, pp. 90-93.
  • Harris, Trudier. “Alice Walker’s “Roselily”: Meditations on Culture, Politics, and Chains.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 2, 2017, pp. 28-48.
  • Kreyling, Michael. “The Last Faulkner: The Reiverson the Road to Banality.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 2, 2017, pp. 10-27.
  • Morris, Christopher. “The Intellectual Lives of Natchez and Concord, and the Legacies of Slavery.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 2, 2017, pp. 49-70.

Southern Spaces

  • Amador, José. “The Pursuit of Health: Colonialism and Hookworm Eradication in Puerto Rico.” Southern Spaces. 30 March, 2017.
  • Hill, Sarah H. “All Roads Led from Rome: Facing the History of Cherokee Expulsion.” Southern Spaces. 20 February, 2017.
  • Warden, Paul Michael. “Ungesund: Yellow Fever, the Antebellum Gulf South, and German Immigration.” Southern Spaces. 2 May, 2017.

Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South

  • Fernandez, Mark F. “Taint Creole, T’Aint Cajun, T’Aint French, T’Aint Country American, T’Aint Good”: The First Amendment and the Historian.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 23, no. 2, Fall/Winter2016, pp. 79-98.
  • Lohrenz, Otto. “Clergyman and Philanderer on Two Continents: Alexander Gordon of Eighteenth Century Scotland and Virginia.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 23, no. 2, Fall/Winter2016, pp. 39-61.
  • Podlasli-Labrenz, Heidi. “Revealing the Essential Self”: Sartrean Existentialism in Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour” and “A Pair of Silk Stockings.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 23, no. 2, Fall/Winter2016, pp. 62-78.
  • Simon, Richard M. “Women’s Birth Experiences and Evaluations: A View from the American South.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 23, no. 2, Fall/Winter2016, pp. 1-38.

 

ACADEMIC PRESSES

 Cambridge UP

  • Babb, Valerie. A History of the African American Novel. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017.
  • Gardner, Sarah E. Reviewing the South: The Literary Marketplace and the Southern Renaissance, 1920-1941. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017.

 Duke UP

  • Covington, Howard E. Lending Power: How the Self-Help Credit Union Turned Small-Time Loans into Big-Time Change. Durham, Duke UP, 2017.
  • Forner, Karlyn. Why the Vote Wasn’t Enough for Selma. Durham, Duke UP , 2017.
  • Merish, Lori. Archives of Labor: Working-class Women and Literary Culture in the Antebellum United States. Durham, Duke UP, 2017.

Louisiana State UP

  • Brown, Trent, ed. Sex and Sexuality in Modern Southern Culture. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017.
  • Heath, James O. To Face Down Dixie South Carolina’s War on the Supreme Court in the Age of Civil Rights. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017.
  • Hinrichsen, Lisa, Gina Caison, and Stephanie Rountree, eds. Small-screen Souths Region, Identity, and the Cultural Politics of Television. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017.
  • Holm, April. A Kingdom Divided: Evangelicals, Loyalty, and Sectionalism in the Civil War Era. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017. Print.
  • Miller, Monica Carol. Being Ugly: Southern Women Writers and Social Rebellion. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017.
  • Willoughby, Urmi Engineer. Yellow Fever, Race, and Ecology in Nineteenth-century New Orleans. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017.

McFarland

  • Pickett, Margaret F. Eliza Lucas Pinckney: Colonial Plantation Manager and Mother of American Patriots, 1722-1793. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2016.
  • Scherr, Arthur. Thomas Jefferson’s Image of New England: Nationalism versus Sectionalism in the Young Republic. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2016.

 Ohio State UP

  • Donahue, James J., Jennifer Ann Ho, and Shaun Morgan, eds. Narrative, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States. Columbus, OH: Ohio State UP, 2017.
  • Jabir, Johari. Conjuring Freedom: Music and Masculinity in the Civil War’s “Gospel Army”. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 2017.
  • Oforlea, Aaron Ngozi. James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and the Rhetorics of Black Male Subjectivity. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 2017.
  • Wilson, Jessica Hooten. Walker Percy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and the Search for Influence. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 2017.

 Oxford UP

  • Gleeson-White, Sarah. William Faulkner at Twentieth Century-Fox: The Annotated Screenplays. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2017.
  • Hayes, Kevin J. George Washington: A Life in Books. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2017.
  • Jackson, Robert. Fade In, Crossroads: A History of the Southern Cinema. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. Print.
  • Murphet, Julian. Faulkner’s Media Romance. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2017. 

Southeast Missouri State UP

  • Rieger, Christopher, and Andrew B. Leiter, eds. Faulkner and Hurston. S.L.: Southeast Missouri State UP, 2017. (table of contents here).

U of Alabama P

  • Wonham, Henry B., and Lawrence Howe, eds. Mark Twain and Money: Language, Capital, and Culture. Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama, 2017.

U of Chicago P

  • Hudson, Peter James. Bankers and Empire: How Wall Street Colonized the Caribbean. Chicago: U of Chicago, 2017.
  • Ikard, David. Lovable Racists, Magical Negroes, and White Messiahs. Chicago: U of Chicago, 2017.
  • Roberts, Brian. Blackface Nation: Race, Reform, and Identity in American Popular Music, 1812-1925. Chicago: U of Chicago, 2017. Print.

U of Georgia P

  • Blight, David W., and Jim Downs, eds. Beyond Freedom Disrupting the History of Emancipation. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017. Print.
  • Bone, Martyn. Where the New World Is: Literature About the U.S. South at Global Scales. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Ferguson, Robert Hunt. Remaking The Rural South: Interracialism, Christian Socialism, and Cooperative Farming In Jim Crow Mississippi. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Gillmer, Jason A. Slavery and Freedom in Texas: Stories from the Courtroom, 1821-1871. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Harris, Dawn. Punishing The Black Body: Marking Social and Racial Structures in Barbados and Jamaica. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Jeffries, Judson L. The Black Panther Party in a City Near You. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Snyder, Jeffrey Aaron. Making Black History The Color Line, Culture, and Race in the Age of Jim Crow. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.

U of Illinois P

  • Bedingfield, Sid. Newspaper Wars Civil Rights and White Resistance in South Carolina 1935-1965. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2017.
  • Case, Sarah H. Leaders of Their Race Educating Black and White Women in the New South. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2017.
  • David, Emmanuel. Women of the Storm Civic Activism After Hurricane Katrina. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2017.
  • Horne, Gerald. The Rise and Fall of the Associated Negro Press: Claude Barnett’s Pan-African News and the Jim Crow Paradox. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2017.
  • Lowney, John. Jazz Internationalism Literary Afro-modernism and the Cultural Politics of Black Music. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2017.
  • Perkins, J. Blake. Hillbilly Hellraisers: Federal Power and Populist Defiance in the Ozarks. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2017.

UP of Florida

  • Bates, Lynsey A.., John M.. Chenoweth, and James A.. Delle, eds. Archaeologies of Slavery and Freedom in the Caribbean: Exploring the Spaces in between. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2016.
  • Kealing, Bob. Elvis Ignited: The Rise of an Icon in Florida. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.
  • Manley, Elizabeth S. The Paradox of Paternalism: Women and the Politics of Authoritarianism in the Dominican Republic. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.
  • Murphy, Melissa Scott, Haagen D. Klaus, and Clark Spencer Larsen, eds. Colonized Bodies, Worlds Transformed: Toward a Global Bioarchaeology of Contact and Colonialism. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2016.
  • Spriggs, Kent, ed. Voices of Civil Rights Lawyers: Reflections from the Deep South, 1964-1980. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.
  • Wilson, Gregory D. Mississippian Beginnings. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.

UP of Mississippi

  • Clemons, Michael L., Donathan L. Brown, and William H. L. Dorsey, eds. Dream and Legacy: Dr. Martin Luther King in the Post-civil Rights Era. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Dickinson, James Luther. I’m Just Dead, I’m Not Gone. Ed. Ernest Suarez. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Goleman, Michael J. Your Heritage Will Still Remain: Racial Identity and Mississippi’s Lost Cause. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Hamblin, Robert W. Living in Mississippi: The Life and times of Evans Harrington. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Harper, Ryan P. The Gaithers and Southern Gospel: Homecoming in the Twenty-first Century.Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Henkel, Scott. Direct Democracy: Collective Power, the Swarm, and the Literatures of the Americas. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Howell, Jeffery Brian. Hazel Brannon Smith: The Female Crusading Scalawag. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Jones, Michael Owen, and Lucy M. Long, eds. Comfort Food: Meanings and Memories. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Lyon, Carter Dalton. Sanctuaries of Segregation: The Story of the Jackson Church Visit Campaign. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Montgomery, Maxine Lavon. Conversations With Edwidge Danticat. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Ownby, Ted, and Charles Reagan Wilson, eds. The Mississippi Encyclopedia. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Posey, Josephine McCann. Succeeding against Great Odds: Alcorn State University in Its Second Century. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Thomas, Bonnie. Connecting Histories: Francophone Caribbean Writers Interrogating Their Past. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Watkins, Lorie, ed. A Literary History of Mississippi. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.
  • Watson, Jay, Jaime Harker, and James G. Thomas, eds. Faulkner and Print Culture. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press, 2017.

U of Minnesota P

  • Capshaw, Katharine, and Anna Mae Duane, eds. Who Writes for Black Children?: African American Children’s Literature before 1900. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2017.
  • Solomon, Jeff. So Famous and so Gay: The Fabulous Potency of Truman Capote and Gertrude Stein. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2017..

U of North Carolina P

  • Asch, Chris Myers, and George Derek Musgrove. Chocolate City: A History of Race and Democracy in the Nation’s Capital. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • CapoÌ, Julio. Welcome to Fairyland: Queer Miami before 1940. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Cox, Karen L. Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Crow, Jeffrey J., and Larry E. Tise, eds. New Voyages to Carolina: Reinterpreting North Carolina History. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Farmer, Ashley D. Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Grant, Nicholas. Winning Our Freedoms Together: African Americans and Apartheid, 1945-1960. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Grundy, Pamela. Color and Character: West Charlotte High and the American Struggle over Educational Equality. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Gussow, Adam. Beyond the Crossroads: The Devil and the Blues Tradition. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Hayes, John. Hard, Hard Religion: Interracial Faith in the Poor South. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Hess, Earl J. The Battle of Peach Tree Creek: Hood’s First Effort to save Atlanta. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Hinnershitz, Stephanie. A Different Shade of Justice: Asian Americans Civil Rights in the South. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Hobson, Maurice J. The Legend of Black Mecca: Politics and Class in the Making of Modern Atlanta. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Malavasic, Alice Elizabeth. The F Street Mess: How Southern Senators Rewrote the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Robinson, Michael D. A Union Indivisible Secession and the Politics of Slavery in the Border South. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Rymsza-Pawlowska, M. J. History Comes Alive Public History and Popular Culture in the 1970s. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Smith, Adam I. P. The Stormy Present: Conservatism and the Problem of Slavery in Northern Politics, 1846-1865. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Walden, Michael L. North Carolina beyond the Connected Age: The Tar Heel State in 2050. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.
  • Ziparo, Jessica. This Grand Experiment: When Women Entered the Federal Workforce in Civil War-era Washington, D.C. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2017.

U of South Carolina P

  • Bennett, Chet. Resolute Rebel: General Roswell S. Ripley, Charleston’s Gallant Defender. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. 2017.
  • Dennis, Jeff W. Patriots and Indians: Shaping Identity in Eighteenth-century South Carolina. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. 2017.
  • Dunkerly, Robert M., and Irene B. Boland. Eutaw Springs: The Final Battle of the American Revolution’s Southern Campaign. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. 2017.
  • Edenfield, Olivia Carr. Understanding Andre Dubus. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. 2017.
  • Emerson, W. Eric, and Karen Stokes, eds. Days of Destruction: Augustine Thomas Smythe and the Civil War Siege of Charleston. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. 2017.
  • Frye, Steven. Understanding Larry McMurtry. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. 2017.
  • Hagstette, Todd, ed. Reading William Gilmore Simms: Essays of Introduction to the Author’s Canon. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. 2017.
  • Moore, Geneva Cobb. Maternal Metaphors of Power in African American Women’s Literature: From Phillis Wheatley to Toni Morrison. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press. 2017.

U of Tennessee P

  • Duin, Julia. In the House of the Serpent Handler A Story of Faith and Fleeting Fame in the Age of Social Media. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2017.
  • Elliott, Sam D. John C. Brown of Tennessee Rebel, Redeemer, and Railroader. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2017
  • King, Daniel Robert. Cormac McCarthy’s Literary Evolution: Editors, Agents, and the Crafting of a Prolific American Author. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2016.
  • Powers, Peter Kerry. Goodbye Christ? Religion, Masculinity, and the New Negro Renaissance. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2017.
  • Ross, James D. Jr. The Rise and Fall of the Southern Tenant Farmers Union in Arkansas. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2017.

U of Virginia P

  • Billings, Warren M., and Brent Tarter, eds. “Esteemed Bookes of Lawe” and the Legal Culture of Early Virginia. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
  • Brooks, Clayton McClure. The Uplift Generation: Cooperation across the Color Line in Early Twentieth-century Virginia. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
  • Ellis, Clifton, and Rebecca Ginsburg, eds. Slavery in the City: Architecture and Landscapes of Urban Slavery in North America. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
  • Griffin, Patrick, ed. Experiencing Empire: Power, People, and Revolution in Early America. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
  • Howard, Thomas L. III. Society Ties: A History of the Jefferson Society and Student Life at the University of Virginia. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
  • Kelso, William M. Jamestown, the Truth Revealed. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
  • Sahakian, Emily. Staging Creolization: Women’s Theater and Performance from the French Caribbean. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
  • Valsania, Maurizio. Jefferson’s Body: A Corporeal Biography. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2017.
  • Ward, Candace. Crossing the Line: Early Creole Novels and Anglophone Caribbean Culture in the Age of Emancipation. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2017.