Volume 51, Issue 2 January 2018

Volume 51, Issue 2
January 2018

undead issue

James A. Crank is an assistant professor of American literature and culture at the University of Alabama. Author of the forthcoming Understanding Randall Kenan, as well as Understanding Sam Shepard and editor of New Approaches To Gone With The Wind, he is currently editing a collection of James Agee’s short fiction.

I greet you at the beginning of a new year (2018), a new semester (Spring—although it certainly doesn’t feel like it yet), and a new conference. In a few, short weeks, we will gather in Austin for our biennial conference. If you haven’t had a moment to check out the program or to view the info provided by SSSL, please point your internets to https://www.sssl2018austin.org/

I’ve turned this issue of the newsletter over to the crew for Undead Souths. Their content appears below, but I’d still like to remind everyone that their amazing collection is available for purchase (https://lsupress.org/books/detail/undead-souths/). I hear tell they are working on a sequel, so even the idea of the undead south will never die.

I look forward to seeing all of y’all in Austin in about three weeks for some fine papers, some stiff drinks, and some roasted beef with watery tomato sauce.

Respect,
JAC

 

President’s Column

On a recent flight to Austin from New York City, I finally finished the ubiquitous podcast S-Town—the subject of no fewer than ten presentations at SSSL 2018. While I find Brian Reed’s representations of regional and class difference troubling, the show is, I think, quite smart about time and temporality. Indeed, I find myself returning again and again to the sundial mottos with which John B. McLemore was so taken. “Your life is tedious and brief. All sundial mottos are sad like that,” McLemore noted. He was not wrong. Even the sunniest versions—one might think of the sundial motto featured in an early scene of Gone With the Wind, “Do not squander time. That is the stuff life is made of”—are subtle memento mori. As I listened to the final episode of S-Town, I contemplated my own mortality—did I mention that my flight home was quite bumpy?—and remembered the sundial that my grandmother kept in her backyard. Its motto read “Velocius sole tempus.” While a source of utter bewilderment when I was a child, now I get it. Time seems to be flying faster than the sun these days. Here it is nearly February 2018, nearly time for our biennial conference….

The Conference Committee—myself and the incomparable Delia Byrnes, Jackie Pinkowitz, and Adena Rivera-Dundas—has been making the most of its time, often working past dark to get details both big and small sorted. Let me thank Delia, Jackie, and Adena for their remarkable efforts and steadfast support over the past year. I couldn’t have asked for a better team.

We are particularly proud of the diversity of the 2018 SSSL Conference. A wide range of organizations have cosponsored this conference, including the University of Texas at Austin Department of English, Mississippi Quarterly, Harry Ransom Center, Michener Center for Writers, New Writers Project, John L. Warfield Center for African and African American Studies, Center for Mexican American Studies, and Department of History. As a result, we have been able to arrange a terrific line-up of plenaries, including a reading by National Book Award-winning poet Nikky Finney, a celebration of the career of Trudier Harris, and a talk by the distinguished Latino/a/x studies scholar José E. Limón. And then there’s the program. SSSL 2018 garnered a record number of proposals; we will welcome more than 230 people to UT next month. Nearly all of these presentations will take up our theme, “South By and By,” a playful nod to the future of the Society, as well as the increasingly diverse literatures we study. I have been coming to SSSL since 2004. In that time, I cannot remember a more dynamic or far-flung set of conference topics. What a way to reflect on the past and future of southern literary studies.

Speaking of which, since 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of this Society, this year’s conference will conclude with a plenary session entitled “SSSL By and By? The Society for the Study of Southern Literature @ 50—Problems and Prospects.” We hope to have a very frank discussion—over a free lunch, no less!—of where the Society has been and will go. In advance of that discussion, we invite you to share your thoughts on the organization and field via a brief, anonymous, and open-ended survey:

https://utexas.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_eQmr52aiZyBvGHX

The survey will remain open until 1 February 2018. Thank you in advance for your time and honesty.

Needless to say, we hope that you will heed the sundials’ advice and make the most of your time here in Austin. In addition to the panels, roundtables, and plenaries, the Ransom Center reading room will be open Wednesday through Saturday for those of you wanting to do some research while you are in town. I also encourage you to take in the Center’s new exhibition on Vaudeville. We will also have receptions on Thursday and Saturday nights. Finally, I have heard tell that Austin offers opportunities for decent food, drink, and live music. As another sundial admonishes, “Altera pars otio, pars ista labori.

Let me close by looking yet further into the future. At the end of 2017, the membership of the Society elected four new members to the Executive Council: Rain Prud’homme Cranford, University of Calgary; Sharon Holland, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; Sherita Johnson, University of Southern Mississippi; and Qiana Whitted, University of South Carolina. Congratulations to all. And many thanks to the Executive Council members whose terms are expiring: Amy Clukey, Leigh Anne Duck, Thomas Haddox, and Anthony Szczesiul. Since my term as president will end just as soon as the 2018 conference wraps, the president-elect will call for another round of Executive Council elections in a few weeks’ time. So, perhaps that’s the best way to end this column: I am delighted to announce that Lisa Hinrichsen will succeed me as President of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature. I know that Lisa will excel in this position. Please join me in wishing her good luck and godspeed.

Vita in motu,

Cole

 

Emerging Scholars Organization

(ESO Update)

By Kelly Vines, President

This column serves the dual purpose of highlighting ESO events at SSSL and reflecting on the last two years of our progress with an eye toward the future.

First and foremost, we would like to invite you all to attend any of the panels and social events we have planned for the upcoming SSSL conference in Austin. Here’s a brief description of what we have planned:

Friday, February 16:

8:00-9:00 – ESO Coffee Hour – We welcome ESO members and first-time attendees to join us for coffee before panels begin on Friday morning. Location to be announced.

1:20-2:40 – ESO Informational Meeting – This meeting will introduce new SSSL attendees to the Emerging Scholars Organization, providing more information about our mentorship program and other initiatives that might be of interest to graduate students, contingent faculty members, lecturers, instructors, visiting assistant professors, those new to the field of southern studies, and any additional SSSL members who define themselves as “emerging scholars.” We will look back on the organization’s first four years and develop plans for the future. We will also briefly discuss the next executive council election, as we will call for nominees and hold our election shortly after the conference ends.

2:50-4:10 – SOUTH 101: Teaching Southern Studies in Introductory and Interdisciplinary Courses – Our group of panelists (Margaret Bauer, Sara Černe, Jim Coby, Justin Greer, Justin Mellette, and Laura Wilson) will present a variety of innovative methods for incorporating southern studies into introductory and interdisciplinary courses. After their brief presentations, the rest of the panel time will be devoted to an open conversation between participants and audience members. The ultimate goal is to present successful course designs and then to think together about future courses that engage with southern studies in new and interesting ways.

 

Saturday, February 17:

9:00-10:20 – Emergent Monographs: UP Editors on the First Book Project – The editors on this roundtable will discuss the book publication process from proposal to print, tailoring explication and advice specifically for emerging scholars who are working on their first book projects. The panel will begin with short introductions from each panelist, featuring general guidance and specific insight about situating an author’s work as a good “fit” for their representative UP and series. After introductory comments, the majority of the panel time will be devoted to answering audience questions. Panelists include Natasha Barnes (Caribbean Studies Series Editor at the UP of Mississippi), Katie Keene (Associate Editor for African American, southern, and folklore projects at the UP of Mississippi), Randall Miller, (Southern Dissent Series Editor at the UP of Florida), Donald Pease (New Americanist Series Editor at Duke UP), Riché Richardson (New Southern Studies Series Editor at the U of Georgia P), and Scott Romine (Southern Literary Studies Series Editor at Louisiana State UP).

12:00-1:20 – On Emerging Scholarship: A Journal Editors Roundtable – Journal editors will discuss their experiences reviewing and editing emergent scholarship. Participants will make suggestions for revising seminar papers or dissertation chapters into professional articles and provide tips for emerging scholars who are preparing to submit their work for publication. Panelists will give short presentations, then invite questions from the audience. Panelists include Ted Atkinson, editor at Mississippi Quarterly; Margaret D. Bauer, editor at the North Carolina Literary Review; Sharon P. Holland, editor of south: a scholarly journal; and Pearl McHaney, editor of the Eudora Welty Review.

1:30-2:30 – Emerging Scholars Organization Mentorship Lunch – We will be holding a lunch for those who participate in the Emerging Scholars Mentorship Program (either as a mentor or mentee). This luncheon will provide participants with the opportunity to meet and catch up with their mentorship partner at the conference. Boxed lunches will be provided. If you are interested in attending, you should RSVP to our Mentorship Chairperson, Heather Fox, by sending an email to emergingscholarsorg@gmail.com.

 

Sunday, February 18:

12:00-1:20 – Plenary Session #4: SSSL By and By?: The Society for the Study of Southern Literature @50—Problems and Prospects – While the ESO did not organize this plenary session, we encourage emerging scholars to attend and participate in a conversation about the future of the organization. Lunch will be provided by SSSL.

 

In addition to the events we have organized at the upcoming conference, we have been busy over the last two years. Here are some of the highlights:

  • We’ve developed a mission statement to guide this organization into the future, emphasizing our “power to shape the future of the field and create space for emerging and emergent scholars to explore worlds within and beyond the university as currently imagined.”
  • Last year, we developed a proposal for a graduate student conference paper award for the SSSL biennial conference. I am pleased to announce that the SSSL executive council accepted our proposal, and the award will be given for the first time in 2018.
  • We have continued to connect emerging and established scholars through our mentorship program. We have paired up more than 60 scholars together in our first four years, and we look forward to even more partnerships.
  • The ESO held events and proposed panels at both SAMLA 88 in Jacksonville, FL and SAMLA 89 in Atlanta, GA. We’ve held informational meetings at both conferences to solicit feedback about future initiatives from our membership, and we’ve organized five panels to showcase new work in southern studies. We’ve also held well-attended social events to provide emerging scholars with an opportunity to connect with one another.
  • We have added numerous resources to our website including working bibliographies, spotlight interviews, and resources for emerging scholars. We are especially grateful to Delia Byrnes for helping us keep our website updated.
  • Finally, we have established a writing circle for emerging scholars, connecting writers together to read and respond to one another’s work. In the same vein, we are working to establish a reading circle to facilitate conversations about new and popular scholarship in southern studies between graduate students at institutions around the globe. We are indebted to Garrett Gilmore (UC Irvine) for his help with developing and organizing the writing circle.

In my tenure as President of this organization, I hoped to continue the inaugural council’s vision to create a community of scholars who can communicate and collaborate with one another across our disparate geographies and to make SSSL and southern studies a more welcoming place for emerging scholars. The mentorship program, our events at SAMLA, and the writing circle provide opportunities for connection, and the resources on our website provide support to scholars new to the field.

In addition to these goals, we’ve also pushed this organization into newer terrain by advocating on behalf of emerging scholars in political realms. I am particularly proud of the letter we drafted regarding the proposed change to the U.S. tax code. We were able to act quickly and distribute the letter widely, which enabled many to send letters of their own. I hope to see this organization continue to facilitate public conversations and encourage activism about important issues.

As I think about what we have accomplished over these last two years, I am profoundly grateful to Jennie Lightweis-Goff, Heather Fox, Jill Fennell, Will Palmer, and Stephanie Rountree for their innovative thinking and hard work. Together, we are grateful to the SSSL executive council for listening and responding to us and advocating on behalf of emerging scholars. We would also like to thank the many established scholars who have volunteered their time and labor to advise and mentor emerging scholars individually as well as the ESO executive council collectively.

If you would like to check out any of our initiatives, you can visit our page on the SSSL website: www.southernlit.org/eso/. If you would like to participate in our mentorship program or if you have ideas about how we might continue to support emerging scholars, please send us an email at emergingscholarsorg@gmail.com

 

Q&A with Anderson, Hagood, & Turner on Undead Souths

SSSL Newsletter 2018

 

Q: What do you perceive as Undead Southss influence, if it has one at this early stage?

EGA: Except for the one conservative reviewer who got hung up on “why do they have to break southern literature?,” the reviews of Undead Souths have been really positive. Which for me goes to the fantastic work our contributors did, across the board; the chapters are uniformly strong and intriguing, which adds not just to the quality of the book but also to the complexity of the phenomena we’re all exploring. I especially love how the essays, taken both individually and collectively, build that complexity. At the same time, the skeletal elephant in the room is the massive interest in all manner of undeadness—not just a “southern” interest, of course, which is something the book argues in the very act of breaking southern literature—but a national and global interest. Just as obviously, we didn’t invent undeadness—and, as we developed the book, we were very happily aware of amazing work such as (for example) Ghost-Watching American Modernity by Maria del Pilar Blanco. WE’RE NOT ALONE. So I think it’ll be interesting to think about Undead Souths’s influence as part of this larger undead tsunami as well as the book’s influence within southern literary studies.

TH: I agree with Eric. It is amazing how many people find the concept of undeadness resonant. And there is new exciting work being done. I taught a graduate seminar on undeadness in the South last year, and it yielded papers and presentations on opioids in south Florida, undeadness in Disney, the undeadness of Zelda Fitzgerald, and many other unexpected approaches. The power of the concept of undeadness lies in its flexibility. And that flexibility is especially important in a time when the market is in such truly bad shape. More and more doctoral students are forced to shape their futures outside the academy. Undeadness is a term/concept that blends popular appeal with critical depth in a very unique and powerful way that would seem perfect for scholars looking to take their work out into the world beyond the academy by exploring alt-ed opportunities.

DCT: Very much so, Taylor. I taught a graduate seminar on very contemporary southern lit/media in Spring 2016, soon after Undead Souths was published. I’d planned on dedicating a couple of weeks to “The Undead South,” but after those discussions it seemed that undeadness more or less took over the course. Like a zombie infestation, it just keep spreading into all our other texts and discussions. But in a good way. To pick up on Eric’s comments, I’ve also found it very bracing that we’ve received good words back on so many different facets of the collection. Reviewers tend to single out different essays for praise each time, just as the referees did with the initial manuscript, and we know fellow scholars and teachers who’ve been citing and teaching various individual chapters from the book. These responses affirm the sheer eclecticism of the collection, how a collective of sharp, thoughful critics collaborated from afar to create this memorable vision of “southern” (broadly understood) undeadness. Some of our contributors were well established scholars, and some were emerging, and they sighted undeadness through multiple theoretical and historical sextants. In their hands, undeadness yielded a number of fresh critical takes on some of the big names of southern “Gothic” lit—Poe, Faulkner, O’Conner, Cormac McCarthy—alongside some quite timely pieces (e.g., southern undeadness in tv shows like True Blood and The Walking Dead, in comics like Bayou and The Goon, in the re-rising of the Confederate dead, in the spectral architectonics of the South’s/U.S.’s “most haunted” cityscape of old New Orleans, in southeastern Native funerary rites and ghostly genealogies, in the posthumous political recitations of Emmett Till’s death, and in productive monstrosity in Randall Kenan’s fiction) as well as some unlooked-for, but very welcome topics (overlaps between African American and Native diaspora in Charles W. Chesnutt’s work; photographic and poetic spatiliaties in Civil War daguereotypes and contemporary responses by photographer Sally Mann and U.S. poet laureate Natasha Trethewey; what we’re afraid of in “hillybilly horror” flicks; and circum-Caribbean connections uncovered in Herman Melville’s zombie laborers, in the “plantation horror” genre of classic Hollywood cinema, in the surrealism of Irish-born, Trinidadian writer Shani Mootoo, and between T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land and Wilson Harris’s Jonestown). I love the miscellany of ideas and approaches in Undead Souths, and am glad that reviewers and fellow scholars are responding in kind.

EGA: I haven’t had the chance to teach an Undead Souths class yet. But I regularly teach Mason Core (general education) classes on Vampires and can attest that vampires are very, very interesting to students from a wide range of majors and from diverse walks of life.

 

Q: So are you guys seeing undeadness everywhere now?

DCT: Yes, undeadness everywhere, galore, for better and not. Especially overspreading into spaces beyond the strictly literary.  Undeadness extended to corpses reassembled and reanimated through means biomedical (e.g., cryopreservation) and technological/medial (e.g., digital avatars living on after the human body is gone), to animality (e.g., a parasitic wasp stinging its eggs into a ladybug, the chemicals zombifying the not-dead beetle while the growing larva feeds on the host’s nutrients and fluids, the red-and-black exoskeleton remade into a makeshift cocoon, until the wasp brood emerges. But, if sufficiently vibrant, holistic enough, the ladybug may well sustain and outlive this metamorphosis, going forward. Through this radical hybridization of forms, new life is generated, even if it is an uncanny afterlife of the undead.) Yes, undeadness everywhere, galore, for better and not.

EGA: Absolutely! Undeadness is everywhere! I mean, it’s not a coincidence that the demogorgon & demodogs in Stranger Things live in an Upside Down that’s rendered on screen as sub-surface. It keeps rising up, and as it does, characters’ memories keep rising up, or staying suppressed . . . lots of figurative undeadness there, and lots of characters and situations that return from a dark place and sometimes carry that dark place back with them, even though no one literally (if that’s the right word) rises back up from the dead. And of course just a few weeks ago Doctor Who regenerated again. And what is Whovian regeneration if not a form of undeadness? Obviously WE haven’t wrought all this and more by putting together a scholarly collection of essays. But, again, we’re tapping into, and joining, something that’s way bigger than Undead Souths.

TH: Yes indeed. What I have found is that once these dimensions of undeadness get unleashed, people all around me take it and run. They start seeing undeadness all around us before I do! Again, the term/concept tends to be so flexible and provocative that it resonates with people when it gets into their systems.

 

Q: More speculatively, how would you like Undead Souths to help shape various fields?

DCT: As undeadness continues to have intellectual and cultural life in it, I believe its notions can help shape thoughts and attitudes on an array of  contemporary issues:

*military/legal/ethnic/nationalisitic: threats of terrorism and military hostilities; tensions over immigration and overcrowding;

*medical: fears of pandemic; anxieties over uncontrollable drug use (where opiates become the religion of the masses);

*religious: physical resurrection and the possibilities for immortality via new media and technologies

*financial: concerns over a flatlining economy (with attendant “zombie” mortgages); dead-end recyclings of global capital

*historical: battles over heritage and hate attached to the U.S. Civil War; “social death” of enslaved Africans and their descendants, resurrected in the #BlackLivesMatter movement;

*institutional: ties between religious and other institutions (corporate, political, academic, etc.);

*ecological: concerns over the ahuman ecology, where “nature” is no longer viewed as separate, inert materia to be turned to human ends;

*political: an ongoing red states voting block, despite a deadened two-party political system, one that helped elect as U.S. President a New York millionaire-populist, with possible strains of early onset dementia.

These issues, to name but a few, seem ripe to bring out the undead, and vice versa. And these matters, of course, emerge not just in the American South, but are often linked or buttressed through images and ideas of the South, or hold special currency in the context of southernness.

EGA: Good thoughts there, Dan. If anyone other than me has ever read the Collected Works of Me, they know that much of my work goes to disturbed and disturbing ecologies and the implicit notions of more functional, functioning ecologies that undergird my work on damaged, scarred, and otherwise traumatized natural and built environments. So I’m all for pushing ecological undeadness even further than we do in Undead Souths One. (Can we start calling it “Undead Souths One??”). I also think that much work remains to be done on historicizing undeadness. I’d love to see and hear from historians, including art historians, on this.

TH: Yes to all the above. I like the idea of tracing undeadness more through the arts, not just art history but also within the various fields of art, music, and drama. I’m especially excited about the idea of nonhumanities folks working with undeadness.

 

Q: A “follow-up” collection to Undead Souths is being discussed. What are some new possible directions Undead Souths II might take?

DCT: The best part of working on the original Undead Souths was seeing the amazing range of topics and essays generated by a purposefully somewhat broad initial conception of undeadness. We got to watch some really smart, inventive thinkers go to work and put their own improvisations on the undead. We sent out signal ships, and our contributors came back gold-laden. Many minds make fine work. Because of their contributions, undeadness, I suppose, is more of a known entity now, so the onus will be on us, the editors, to make Undead Souths II a collection that connects back to the original book, of course, but one that can stand on its own; it will link to the first collection but needs to be distinct. Like what Lisa Hinrichsen, Gina Caison, and Stephanie Rountree have in mind in shifting from their first joint-venture, Small-Screen Souths (LSUP 2017), to their CFP for an new collection on “New Media and the U.S. South.” A similar shift in scope or emphasis or vision or even spatiality/locales would be good, I think. We need to advance the narrative, not repeat it.

EGA: Yeah, and as it turns out, this is a bigger challenge than we’d originally imagined. How exactly do you go beyond “The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture?” One possibility is to push “southern,” maybe by thinking more about global Souths and global forms of undeadness. But this is still an open question.

TH: I agree with Dan that the book’s contributors developed the richness of undeadness in the South, and I think allowing them to do so again makes sense. Undead Souths has lived on via its Facebook page, and I like the idea of having the conversation drive toward a new collection. There could be value in creating a website that includes shorter essays to which people respond, and from that could be developed a second collection. Folks get really excited about this stuff and want to talk about it. Facebook is a forum for that on some level, but we might be able to find other venues even better suited to conversation. Eric mentions pushing “southern,” and we might think more globally and/or hemispherically. But we might also do well to push beyond “Gothic” and just focus on “Beyond.” Looking at Dan’s list, I love the idea of a second book that really draws in people from outside the humanities. How great could it be to bring in scientists, business experts, and researchers in medicine? Could there be room for a chapter on Ross Perot’s “Voodoo economics”? And, in keeping with my response to question #1, maybe there’s something to be said for a book aimed at a general readership…but maybe that’s a different thing altogether.

DCT: I do think undeadness is everywhere, if you look right. And we’d do well to spread the word to other fields, and listen back. Taylor mentioned earlier how undeadness became an empowering concept for students in his graduate seminar, not just in their scholarly life but for making their work meaningful in non-academic arenas, for engaging alt-ed audiences and even jobs. I think that’s certainly worth pursuing. In many respects, the academy itself, or at least the university, seems to have given over to the worst of corporatization. If, as the U.S. Supreme Court says, corporations are people, too, universities—at least from what I’ve seen—are undead people. Like zombies, they don’t work quite right. The university’s main drive seems now one borrowed from a corporate model: to institute loyalty in its consumers to a particular brand or icon. Universities want to start a feeding frenzy, but they feed on their own constituent parts to do so: students are defined almost wholly as consumer-clients, while faculty at all levels are increasingly alienated from the governance structure. There’s a lack of vibrancy, of sustainability—a real feeling of undeadness to these corporate desires. Those who believe in nothing will believe—and buy—anything, the logic goes. But, in the end, nothing out of nothing comes. However, used properly, undeadness is something that can expose and critique these insufficiencies, and hopefully start generating means to correct them. Other possibilities are instituted, countercultures evolve, thrive outward into an uncreated future. For me, that’s the promise of undeadness going forward.

 

Announcements and CFPs:

  • Announcement

The 2018 SSSL Conference in Austin will conclude with a plenary session entitled “SSSL By and By? The Society for the Study of Southern Literature @ 50–Problems and Prospects.” We hope to have a very frank discussion—over a free lunch, no less!—of where the Society has been and will go.

In advance of that discussion, we invite all members of the Society to share their thoughts on the organization and field via a brief, anonymous, and open-ended survey:

https://utexas.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_eQmr52aiZyBvGHX

  • Announcement

Georgia College in Milledgeville, Georgia, offers short-term Library Research Grants every year to scholars and students whose work would benefit from access to materials in Ina Dillard Russell Library’s Special Collections. Strengths of the collections include Milledgeville/Baldwin County history and culture, (local/regional) women’s history, and Georgia College history. Special Collections houses the papers of authors Flannery O’Connor and Alice Walker and several political figures, including U.S. Secretary of Labor W. J. Usery, U. S. Senator Paul Coverdell, U. S. Representative Carl Vinson, and Georgia State Senator Floyd L. Griffin, Jr. For more information about Special Collections or the grant, please visit our website.

Deadline: April 2, 2018

Contact: nancy.davisbray@gcsu.edu

  • Announcement

The Eudora Welty Foundation and the Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH) are delighted to announce the 2018 Eudora Welty Research Fellowship, to encourage and support research use of the Eudora Welty Collection and related materials at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History by graduate students.

This competitive fellowship of $2,000 will be offered for research conducted in summer 2018. The stipend may be used to cover travel, housing, and other expenses during the recipient’s two-week stay in Jackson, Mississippi.

Please post the promotional flier, available at https://www.mdah.ms.gov/2018-EWF-Flier.pdf, and circulate this information to all those who may be interested. The deadline for applications is February 23, 2018. Additional information and the application form are available on the MDAH website at http://www.mdah.ms.gov/welty/resources/welty-fellowship.php.

To see the description of the Eudora Welty Collection in our online catalog, please visit http://catalog.mdah.ms.gov/cgi-bin/koha/opac-detail.pl?biblionumber=66122.

Thank you very much for your interest and assistance. If you have any questions, please contact Forrest Galey (fgaley@mdah.ms.gov).

  • Announcement

Mark your calendars now to attend the Rose Glen Literary Festival on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at the Sevierville Convention Center. This year’s keynote speaker is Wiley Cash who is a writer in residence at the University of North Carolina-Ashville and also teaches in the Low-Residency MFA Program in Fiction and Nonfiction Writing at Southern New Hampshire University.

http://www.heysmokies.com/rose-glen-literary-festival-2018/

  • Announcement

SAVE THE DATE! The next Southern American Studies Association (SASA) biennial conference will take place March 14-16, 2019, at the Emory Conference Center and Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia. Stay tuned for more information in the coming months, including the conference CFP.

  • Announcement

The John W. Hunt Memorial Scholarship 
The William Faulkner Society offers scholarships for as many as two graduate students to attend the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference in Oxford, Mississippi. These awards are funded by generous donations in memory of Faulkner scholar John W. Hunt, author of William Faulkner: Art in Theological Tension, and by annual dues from members of the Society. The scholarships cover the cost of conference registration, with the possibility of additional funding depending on available resources.

Graduate students may apply directly for the Hunt Scholarships or be nominated by a faculty member. Each application should include: a letter from the student explaining how the student’s work can be enhanced by attending the conference; a current C.V.; and at least one letter of recommendation or a nomination letter from a faculty member familiar with the student’s work. Send all items by email, with “Hunt Scholarship” in the subject line, to the Faulkner Society Advisory Board (wfsociety@gmail.com). The application deadline for the next award is April 16, 2018.

  • CFP

The Tacky South
American Studies Association Annual Meeting
Atlanta, Georgia
November 8-11, 2018

As a way to comment on a person’s style, the word “tacky” has distinctly southern origins. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, it first emerged around 1800 as a noun to describe “a poor white of the Southern States from Virginia to Georgia.” Although the OED does not draw connections between this origin and the origins of the adjective describing something “dowdy, shabby; in poor taste, cheap, vulgar,” these definitions suggest a clear link between national stereotypes of region, race, and class and urbane (and northern urban?) notions of taste, class, and sensibility.
This panel will use these observations regarding the term’s origin to ask new questions about how southern culture and identity have been and continue to be associated with “tackiness.” For instance, in what ways are questions of taste and class still bound up with regional identification? Or, how do “lowbrow,” popular representations transmit and recreate images of the South and southern history? Should we be suspicious of the celebration and enjoyment of southern tackiness at both the popular and scholarly levels? What power structures emerge from labeling something as “tacky” or the implementation of tackiness as an aesthetic mode? Ranging from the rise in popularity of southern-themed reality shows and tourist attractions, to mainstream media’s attempts to address topics such as slavery and civil rights, often the specters of class, race, and region still linger in contemporary notions of what registers as tacky, particularly in the way it refers to things that are cheap, vulgar, common, and unsophisticated. This panel will consist of three to four, 15-20 minute presentations.

By January 27, 2018 please submit 250-word abstracts along with A/V requirements and a short, 100-word bio to Katie Burnett, Fisk University (kburnett@fisk.edu) and Monica Miller, Middle Georgia State University (monica.miller@mga.edu).

  • CFP

South: a scholarly journal invites submissions for a special issue on southern studies, pedagogy, and activism guest edited by David A. Davis to be published in fall 2018. Position papers/essays are due by May 1, 2018. Please submit 2,500 to 3,000 word (10-12 pp.) documents to our website under “submissions” with the title of the article and the designated special issue #southernsyllabus.

Many scholars have responded to recent crises in the South through public pedagogy. After Michael Brown’s murder in Ferguson, Missouri, the hashtag #fergusonsyllabus began to circulate as scholars worked to contextualize and situate the events unfolding near St. Louis. A year later, after Dylann Roof brutally shot and killed nine people at Emmanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, the hashtag #charlestonsyllabus emerged, eventually leading to a book of readings about the roots of racial antipathy in the South. After the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, this summer, #charlottesvillesyllabus appeared as scholars traced the histories of the “lost cause” ideology underlying contemporary white supremacy and its 21st century iteration.
This special issue will address how scholars teach about the South as a site of social unrest. We seek position papers that describe pedagogical techniques and methodologies, consider our obligations to our students, and interrogate our scholarly contributions to social justice discourse. The papers in this issue will explore teaching as activism and activism as teaching.

Some topics for discussion might include:
Strategies for historicizing and contextualizing the culture and histories of white supremacy and its effects on current events
• Approaches to teaching controversial topics, such as lost cause iconography, racial unrest, or fascism
• Methods for creating space for open discussion of necessarily difficult topics
• Ideas for public pedagogy, social outreach, or media contributions to teach beyond the classroom
• Ways to empower students to understand the South and to advocate for social change
• Techniques for experiential learning that engage students in service programs, internships, or research projects related to southern social justice issues
• Suggestions for incorporating political activism into the academic space and the ways scholars/teachers might be able to tie such activism with historical precedent
• Considerations of free speech and public dissent inside and outside the classroom in the Trump presidency

Please submit 2,500 to 3,000 word (10-12 pp.) position papers to our website under “submissions” with the title of the article and the designated special issue #southernsyllabus, https://south.submittable.com/submit.

  • CFP

New Media and the U.S. South [Edited Collection]

Proposals Due May 1, 2018

Editors: Gina Caison (Georgia State University), Lisa Hinrichsen (University of Arkansas), Stephanie Rountree (Auburn University)

We are seeking inventive work from scholars in a variety of fields for an edited collection that will examine the role of new media in relationship to the U.S. South. Technologies of virtuality and transformations in digital media and the geoweb are augmenting traditional concepts of space and place, offering new knowledge politics that carry a cluster of implications for commerce, governance, civic participation, and activism. Beyond its global reach through popular web-based and mobile applications, new media reshape the ways we view and interact within the local, from altering the way we navigate city streets to innovating modes of human intimacy; they challenge and change the ways in which we build and express attachments to place(s), form spatial imaginaries, and interact with landscapes. In examining how changes in information and media landscapes modify concepts of “region,” this collection will both articulate the virtual realities of the 21st-century U.S. South and also historicize the impact of “new” media on a region that has always been mediated.

Recognizing that many forms of “old” media were once “new,” this collection seeks to engage with epistemologies of “newness” that act upon ideas of both “media” and the “South.” To that end, this collection poses several questions for investigation. How have new media technologies challenged the material and linguistic nexuses of southern communities? Might digital technologies aid in, to use Brittany Cooper and Margaret Rhee’s phrase, “hacking the b/w binary” that has permeated narratives of the U.S. South? Or do technologies of geomonitoring and surveillance trap humans in forms of what Jerome E. Dobson and Peter F. Fisher have called “geoslavery”? How are our knowledge and memory of southern space and place being reshaped by new media in the present, and what are the historical antecedents to this phenomenon? What new types of collective memories, politics, and publics are being created through new configurative practices inherent to digital media?

We welcome papers from a variety of scholarly perspectives and methodological approaches. Suggested topics include:

  • The impact of mobile technologies on privacy and surveillance in southern spaces
  • Identity issues in social networks including but not limited to gender, sexuality, race, and disability
  • Place-based new media practices
  • New media and thefostering and/or threatening of cultural diversity, equity, and inclusion
  • Digital neocolonialism
  • Digital decolonization efforts and activism
  • S. South/souths and the digital public sphere
  • Virtual/viral/hypertextual souths
  • Region and the digital divide
  • The U.S. South and big data
  • The mobilizing potential of new media
  • Digital news and disinformation
  • Networked cultural production in the digital age, including media convergence
  • New media and the construction of cultural identity
  • Specific studies of the U.S. South/souths on or across specific platforms (e.g. WhatsApp, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, Wikipedia etc.)
  • Affective experiences with the new media
  • Phenomenological and epistemological implications of new media
  • Podcasting the U.S. South/souths
  • Digital temporalities
  • Locational data mining and new forms of “geoslavery”
  • Neogeographic mapping practices
  • Spatial archives, digital preservation, cultural heritage practices
  • Transmedia narratives
  • The aesthetics and politics of new media
  • New pedagogies for the new media landscape

Chapter proposals of 500 words, along with a 200-word bio should be sent to southandnewmedia@gmail.com by May 1, 2018. We expect to notify authors by the end of May, and to require chapters to be completed by the October 1, 2018.

  • CFP

Society for the Study of Southern Literature Sessions (Two Sessions)

29th Annual American Literature Association Conference

May 24-27, 2018, San Francisco, CA

Deadline: January 22, 2018

Two Open-topic Sessions

The Society for the Study of Southern Literature invites paper proposals for two panels hosted by the Society for the American Literature Association Conference to be held in San Francisco in 2018. Papers relating to any aspect of southern literature and literary history are welcome, as we are organizing two open-topic panels, the final shape of which will be determined by response. We seek presenters engaged in exploring southern literature as expression and representation of region regardless of specific topic or methodology.  As such, work that is interdisciplinary, trans-historical, globally focused, revisionist, or non-paradigmatic is equally welcome as work based in more traditional scholarly approaches.

Send proposals—including paper title, 250-word abstract, and presenter affiliation—to Todd Hagstette (toddh@usca.edu) by January 22, 2018.

  • CFP

Faulkner and García Márquez
A Conference Sponsored by the Center for Faulkner Studies
Southeast Missouri State University
Cape Girardeau, Missouri
October 11-13, 2018

This “Faulkner and García Márquez” conference invites proposals for 15-20 minute papers on any topic related to William Faulkner and/or Gabriel García Márquez. All critical approaches, including pedagogical, are welcomed. We are particularly interested in inter-textual approaches that treat both authors. Proposals for organized panels are also encouraged.

Possible topics could include: race, gender, class, sexuality, psychology, biography, history, war, economics, poverty, the Global South, religion, urban/rural divides, nature, hunting, myth, humor, language, narrative technique, genre, and magical realism.

In addition to the paper sessions, the conference will include a keynote address by Deborah Cohn, an opening banquet, a tour of the University’s renowned L. D. Brodsky Collection of William Faulkner Materials, and a Faulkner and García Márquez-themed art exhibition and reception.

Expanded versions of papers will be considered for possible publication in a collection of essays to be published by Southeast Missouri State University Press as part of their Faulkner Conference Series. Conference presentations and book submissions must be in English.

E-mail a 200-300-word abstract by April 15, 2018, to: cfs@semo.edu Inquiries about the conference (or the juried art show) can be directed to Christopher Rieger at crieger@semo.edu or (573) 651-2620.

FAULKNER AND GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ UNDERGRADUATE WRITING CONTEST:

Undergraduate students from any institution are encouraged to submit papers for this conference. These papers (approx. 7-10 pages) may be on Faulkner, García Márquez, or both. The authors of the top two undergraduate submissions will receive cash prizes respectively of $300 and $200; a waiver of the conference registration and banquet fees; and an invitation to present the winning entries at the conference (winners must participate in the conference to qualify for the cash award). Contest submissions may be submitted by e-mail attachment to cfs@semo.edu and must be received by May 1, 2018. Undergraduate submissions not awarded cash prizes will be considered for inclusion among the presentations at the conference.

NOTE: To be eligible for this contest, a student must be enrolled as an undergraduate during all or part of the 2018 calendar year.

  • CFP

Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference

Faulkner and Slavery, July 22-26, 2018

During his apprenticeship and early years as a published writer, William Faulkner evinced little serious interest in the issue of slavery or in the lives of the enslaved: their experiences, words, deeds, interiority, personal relationships, or historical legacies.  This is perhaps surprising, given the fact of slaveholding, and the likelihood of sexual liaisons between enslavers and the enslaved, in Faulkner’s family history.  After 1930, however, the year he moved his family into an antebellum mansion built by a slaveholding Mississippi planter, Faulkner turned repeatedly to the subject of slavery over the next two decades or so of his writing career.

The forty-fifth annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference will take up as its guiding concern the question, “What did slavery mean in the life, ancestry, environment, imagination, and career of William Faulkner?”  Facets of this question worth exploring may include but are no means limited to:

–histories of slavery in/and the Falkner and/or Butler families of Mississippi

–Mississippi slavery and the history of the Robert Sheegog home in Oxford (later Rowan Oak)

–other histories of slavery in Oxford, Lafayette County, and north Mississippi, or at the University of Mississippi, as contexts for Faulkner’s writings or as depicted in his work

–the figure of the enslaved in Faulkner’s writings:  man, woman, child, the elderly, field laborer, domestic laborer, sexual property, fugitive, “saltwater slave” (first-generation African); the intersectionality of slave identities; etc.

–the “world the slaves made” in Faulkner’s work:  psychology, spirituality, expressivity and expression, affect, sexuality, kinship arrangements and family life, aesthetics and cultural practices, gender roles, childhood, economic activity, forms of resistance to enslavement

–Faulkner’s accounts of the master-slave relationship

–the figure of the enslaver in Faulkner:  men, women, the elderly, children from the slaveholding class; small holders versus large ones; patterns of settlement or migration; etc.

–institutions of slavery:  representations or historical legacies of the Atlantic slave trade, the Middle Passage, the slave market, the slave plantation, plaçage, the whip (or other institutions of slave discipline/punishment), etc.

–the political economy of slavery in Faulkner

–Faulkner’s fiction in/against the history of slavery as traced by Lawrence Levine, Eugene Genovese, Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Orlando Patterson, David Brion Davis, Edmund Morgan, Walter Johnson, C. L. R. James, Eric Williams, Paul Gilroy, or other leading scholars of the subject

–comparative histories or geographies of slavery in Faulkner

–Faulkner’s relationship to slave narrative or other genres from the literary history of New World slavery

–comparative analyses of slavery/the enslaved in Faulkner and other writers or artists:  southern, American, hemispheric, global, twentieth-century, “modernist,” etc.

–cultural legacies of slavery in Faulkner’s fictions of postslavery

–the racial politics of white-authored representations of African American enslavement

The program committee especially encourages full panel proposals for 75-minute conference sessions. Such proposals should include a one-page overview of the session topic or theme, followed by two-page abstracts for each of the panel papers to be included. We also welcome individually submitted 1-2-page abstracts for 15-20-minute panel papers. Panel papers consist of approximately 2,500 words and will be considered by the conference program committee for possible expansion and inclusion in the conference volume published by the University Press of Mississippi.

Session proposals and panel paper abstracts must be submitted by January 31, 2018, preferably through e-mail attachment. All manuscripts, proposals, abstracts, and inquiries should be addressed to Jay Watson, Department of English, The University of Mississippi, P.O. Box 1848, University, MS 38677-1848. E-mail: jwatson@olemiss.edu. Decisions for all submissions will be made by March 15, 2018. http://www.outreach.olemiss.edu/events/faulkner

  

SSSL Bibliography, Winter 2018

Will Murray, Bibliographer and Editorial Assistant for the SSSL Newsletter, is a PhD candidate at the University of Alabama.

Scholarly Journals:

African American Review

  • Brune, Jeffrey A. “Blind Like Me: John Howard Griffin, Disability, Intersectionality, and Civil Rights in Postwar America.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 2, Summer2017, pp. 203-219.
  • Cohen, Lara Langer. “Solomon Northup’s Singing Book.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 3, Fall2017, pp. 259-272.
  • Gill, Michael and Nirmala Erevelles. “The Absent Presence of Elsie Lacks: Hauntings at the Intersection of Race, Class, Gender, and Disability.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 2, Summer2017, pp. 123-137.
  • Hinton, Tiffany N. “The Ecstasy of River Baptisms under Suns Just Like This One”: Sula’s Rites and Sites of Memory.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 3, Fall2017, pp. 291-307.
  • Pickens, Therí A. “Blue Blackness, Black Blueness: Making Sense of Blackness and Disability.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 2, Summer2017, pp. 93-103.
  • Tyler Jr., Dennis. “Jim Crow’s Disabilities: Racial Injury, Immobility, and the “Terrible Handicap” in the Literature of James Weldon Johnson.” African American Review, vol. 50, no. 2, Summer2017, pp. 185-201.

American Literary History

  • Bergner, Gwen. “Danticat’s Vodou Vernacular of Women’s Human Rights.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 3, 2017, pp. 521-545.
  • Crawford, Margo Natalie. “The Twenty-First-Century Black Studies Turn to Melancholy.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 4, 2017, pp. 799-807.
  • Dickson-Carr, Darryl. “Black Literature Matters; or Making It New.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 4, 2017, pp. 790-798.
  • Goudie, Sean. X. “Racial Capitalism and American Literary Studies in the Web of Life.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 3, 2017, pp. 546-564.
  • Murray, Rolland. “Not Being and Blackness: Percival Everett and the Uncanny Forms of Racial Incorporation.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 4, 2017, pp. 726-752.
  • Shreve, Grant. “The Exodus of Martin Delany.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 3, 2017, pp. 449-473.
  • Stuelke, Patricia. “Trayvon Martin, Topdog/Underdog, and the Tragedy Trap.” American Literary History, vol. 29 no. 4, 2017, pp. 753-778.

American Literature

  • Donnelly, Andrew. “The Talking Book in the Secondary Classroom: Reading as a Promise of Freedom in the Era of Neoliberal Education Reform.” American Literature1 June 2017; 89 (2): 355–377.
  • Shon, Sue. “The Skyscraper’s Unseeing Eyes: Louis Sullivan, Nella Larsen, and Racial Formalism.” American Literature1 September 2017; 89 (3): 439–462.

American Studies

  • Pattison, Dale. “Performing the Post-Traumatic City: Tremeand the Politics of Urban Space.” American Studies, vol. 56 no. 1, 2017, pp. 119-139.
  • Woo, Susie. “When Blood Won’t Tell: Integrated Transfusions and Shifting Foundations of Race.” American Studies, vol. 56 no. 1, 2017, pp. 5-28.

Arizona Quarterly

  • Clukey, Amy. “White Troubles: The Southern Imaginary in Northern Ireland 2008-2016.” Arizona Quarterly. 73.4 (Winter 2017): 61-92.

Callaloo

  • Howard, Jonathan. ““Gone with the Ibos”: The Blueness of Blackness in Paule Marshall’s Praisesong for the Widow.” Callaloo, vol. 39 no. 4, 2016, pp. 898-918.
  • Ross, Marlon B. “Trans-Atlantic Parochialism.” Callaloo, vol. 39 no. 4, 2016, pp. 887-897.

Cormac McCarthy Journal

  • Christie, James William. ““He could not call to mind his father’s face”: Oedipal Collapse and Literary Decline in the Border Trilogy.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 15 no. 2, 2017, pp. 128-151.
  • Hanssen, Ken R. ““Men are made of the dust of the earth”: Time, Space, Matter, and Meaning in Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 15 no. 2, 2017, pp. 177-192.
  • Jackson, Joshua Ryan. “This, Too, Shall Pass: Distant Reading a Future in the Ruins of Cormac McCarthy’s Postsouthern Novels.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 15 no. 2, 2017, pp. 107-127.
  • O’Connor, Patrick. “Saving Sheriff Bell: Derrida, McCarthy, and the Opening of Mercantile Ethics in No Country for Old Men.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 15 no. 2, 2017, pp. 152-176.

Early American Literature

  • Lingold, Mary Caton. “Peculiar Animations: Listening to Afro-Atlantic Music in Caribbean Travel Narratives.” Early American Literature, vol. 52 no. 3, 2017, pp. 623-650.

Edgar Allan Poe Review

  • Corcella, Aldo. “A Source for Poe’s “Marginalia”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 2, 2017, pp. 193-208.
  • Dern, John A. “”A Problem in Detection”: The Rhetoric of Murder in Poe’s “The Black Cat”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 2, 2017, pp. 163-182.
  • Kopley, Richard. “Poe as “A Critical Jack Ass”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 2, 2017, pp. 209-217.
  • May, Whitney Shylee. “The Influence of Place on Identity in Poe’s “Morella” and “William Wilson”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 2, 2017, pp. 218-233.
  • Shackelford, Lynne Piper. “”Infected by Superstitions”: Folie à Deuxin “The Fall of the House of Usher”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 2, 2017, pp. 109-124.
  • Sweeney, Susan Elizabeth. “The Horror of Taking a Picture in Poe’s “Tell-Tale Heart”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 2, 2017, pp. 142-162.
  • Tavlin, Zachary. “Finding Poe’s “Rotten Point”: Usher’s Architectural Phrenology.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 2, 2017, pp. 125-141.
  • Tsokanos, Dimitrios. “”The Black Cat” Revisited: A Prolegomenon to Poe’s Greek Imitators.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 18 no. 2, 2017, pp. 183-192.

Faulkner Journal

  • Fujie, Kristin. “Hurt so Bad: The Crisis of Female Embodiment in William Faulkner’s Mosquitoes.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 2, Fall2015, pp. 27-47.
  • MacMaster, Anne. “William Faulkner, Jean Toomer, and the Double Dealer: Close Connections of a Literary Kind.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 2, Fall2015, pp. 3-26.
  • Marutani, Atsushi. “An Ethic of the White Southern Self: The Dialectics of Historical Identity and Individual Anonymity in Intruder in the Dust.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 2, Fall2015, pp. 71-88.
  • Stunden, Sarah E. “Room to Breathe”: Narrative Anacrhony and Suffocation in William Faulkner’s “Pantaloon in Black.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 2, Fall2015, pp. 49-69.
  • Thyssen, Christina. “Ah Kin Pass Wid Anything”: Blackness as Figural Excess in Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 29, no. 2, Fall2015, pp. 89-108.

Global South

  • Clukey, Amy & Wells, Jeremy. “Introduction: Plantation Modernity.” The Global South, vol. 10 no. 2, 2016, pp. 1-10.
  • Crank, James A. “The Plantation is Burning: Queer Melancholies, Violent Intimacies, and Plantation Camp in Django Unchained.” The Global South, vol. 10 no. 2, 2016, pp. 99-114.
  • King, Amy K. “”Just like Back Home—Only Different!”: Plantation Exploitation in 1970s Women-in-Prison Movies Filmed in the Philippines.” The Global South, vol. 10 no. 2, 2016, pp. 48-69.
  • McInnis, Jarvis C. “”Behold the Land”: W. E. B. Du Bois, Cotton Futures, and the Afterlife of the Plantation in the US South.” The Global South, vol. 10 no. 2, 2016, pp. 70-98.
  • Morrissey, Lee. “Transplanting English Plantations in Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko.” The Global South, vol. 10 no. 2, 2016, pp. 11-26.
  • Nunn, Erich. “”A Great Addition to Their Harmony”: Plantation Slavery and Musical Exchange in Seventeenth-Century Barbados.” The Global South, vol. 10 no. 2, 2016, pp. 27-47.

Journal of American Studies

  • Arnold-Forster, Tom. “Dr. Billy Taylor, ‘America’s Classical Music,’ and the Role of the Jazz Ambassador.” Journal of American Studies, vol. 51, no. 1, 2017, p. 117-139.
  • Brown, Holly Cade. “Figuring Giorgio Agamben’s “Bare Life” in the Post-Katrina Works of Jesmyn Ward and Kara Walker.” Journal of American Studies, vol. 51, no. 1, 1-19.

MELUS

  • Bailey, Carol. “Reappropriation as Contestation: Reconstructing Images of Black Women in Kate Rushin’s The Black Back-Ups.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 42 no. 2, 2017, pp. 177-199.
  • Johnson, Benjamin. “Modernity, Authenticity, and the Blues in Sterling Brown’s Flood Poems.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 42 no. 2, 2017, pp. 115-135.
  • Kaisary, Philip. “The Slave Narrative and Filmic Aesthetics: Steve McQueen, Solomon Northup, and Colonial Violence.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 42 no. 2, 2017, pp. 94-114.
  • Kaus, Alaina. “Reimagining the Southern Gothic: The Two Souths in Monique Truong’s Bitter in the Mouth.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 42 no. 3, 2017, pp. 84-101.
  • Sherazi, Melanie Masterton. “The Posthumous Text and Its Archive: Toward an Ecstatic Reading of Ralph Ellison’s Unbound Novel.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 42 no. 2, 2017, pp. 6-29.
  • Teutsch, Matthew. “”Mr. Joe Louis, Help Me”: Sports in the Fiction of Ernest J. Gaines.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 42 no. 3, 2017, pp. 176-200.

Mississippi Quarterly

  • “Emerging Scholars Roundtable.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 5-10.
  • 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 10-12.
  • Arant, Alison. “Parsing the Pleasures of Southern Music Studies.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 34-36.
  • Beilfuss, Michael J. “Rootedness and Mobility: Southern Sacrifice Zones in Ron Rash’s Serena.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 377-397.
  • Burgers, Johannes H. “Using the Digital Yoknapatawpha Database for Research.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 466-469.
  • Cantrell, Paul Alexander. “Flounder, Flounder”: Doubling in Eudora Welty’s “Music from Spain.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 189-212.
  • Carothers, James B. “What It Looks Like to This Bear: An Old Faulknerian Learns to Read Digitally.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 480-485.
  • Carr, Nicole Racquel. “Spoilt Like a Rotten Oyster”: Fictive Sterilization in Kathryn Stockett’s the Help.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 531-550
  • Clark, Christopher W. “What Comes to the Surface: Storms, Bodies, and Community in Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 341-358.
  • Clough, Edward. “Poisonous Possibilities: Telling Stories and Telling Ruins in Donna Tartt’s the Little Friend.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 319-339.
  • Cornell, Elizabeth. “Digital Yoknapatawpha in the Context of the Digital Humanities.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 460-463.
  • Corrigan, John Michael. “Encoding Yoknapatawpha: Considering Faulkner in the Information Age.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 470-473.
  • Dischinger, Matthew. “After Southern Critique.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 36-38.
  • Dischinger, Matthew. “Percival Everett’s Speculative Realities.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 415-435.
  • Gang, Zhou. “A Chinese Woman Writer’s American South.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 59-81.
  • Haddox, Thomas F. “Myth as Therapy in Lee Smith’s Oral History.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 257-275.
  • Hagood, Taylor. “Humanism, Faulkner, and the Digital.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 476-480.
  • Hoefer, Anthony Dyer. “Violence, Spectacular and Slow: Ecology, Genre, and Murder in Biguenet’s Oyster and Rash’s One Foot in Eden.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 487-509.
  • Joiner, Jennie J. “Digital Yoknapatawpha as a Resource for Teachers and Students.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 473-476.
  • Kayser, Casey. “The Most Horrific Tale”: Reading Faulkner’s Sanctuary as a Teenage Horror Legend.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 121-144.
  • King, Amy K. “Plantation, Pulp, Trash: Approaching the Circum-South(S).” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 27-30.
  • Lightweis-Goff, Jennie. “What’s Old about the New Southern Studies?.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol.
  • Lloyd, Christopher. “Introduction: The Twenty-First-Century Southern Novel.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 311-318.
  • McInnis, Jarvis C. “That “The Land Would One Day Be Free”: Reconciling Race and Region in African American and Southern Studies.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 15-20.
  • Miller, Monica Carol. “I’m No Swan”: The Ugly Plot from “Good Country People” to Eating the Cheshire Cat.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 437-454.
  • Miller, Monica Carol. “Looking Ugliness Square in the Face.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 30-31.
  • Murray, William. “The Roof of a Southern Home: A Reimagined and Usable South in Lorraine Hansberry’s a Raisin in the Sun.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 277-293.
  • Prud’homme-Cranford, Rain. “From Bayou to Academe: A Story of Alliance Making.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 20-24.
  • Pruitt, Claude. “Discovering the Timeline in Faulkner’s the Hamlet.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 551-575.
  • Railton, Stephen. “Digital Yoknapatawpha.: A Written Roundtable: Digitizing Yoknapatawpha.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 457-459.
  • Rieger, Christopher. “From Childhood to the Underworld: Native American Birdman Iconography and Karen Russell’s Swamplandia!.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 399-414.
  • Robertson, Sarah. “William Gay, Agrarianism, and Environmentalism.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 359-375.
  • Rountree, Stephanie. “Southern Confection: Toward a Rubric of Anteliberalism.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 12-15.
  • Schwartz, Lawrence. “Launching Flannery O’Connor: The Rockefeller Foundation and a Literary Reputation.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 213-234.
  • Smith, Jon. “Response to the Emerging Scholars Roundtable.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 43-57.
  • Solomon, William. “The Rhetoric of the Freak Show in Welty’s a Curtain of Green.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 167-187.
  • Spoth, Daniel. “Slow Violence and the (Post)Southern Disaster Narrative in Hurston, Faulkner, and Beasts of the Southern Wild.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 145-166.
  • Stephanie, Li. “Valerie Martin’s Property: A Neo-Enslaver Narrative.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 235-255.
  • Sweeney, Erin. “Landless Whites, Dual-Class Identification, and Sutpen’s Sub-Design.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 101-119.
  • Tavlin, Zachary. “Ravel out into Time”: Phenomenology and Temporality in as I Lay Dying.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 83-100.
  • Teutsch, Matthew and Katharine Henry. “Memories Wasn’t a Place, Memories Was in the Mind”: The Gothic in Ernest J. Gaines’s the Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 511-530.
  • Towner, Theresa M. “Digital Yoknapatawpha.: Where We Are.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 3/4, Summer/Fall2015, pp. 464-466.
  • Vernon, Zackary. “The Anthropocene and the Future of Southern Studies.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 32-34.
  • Vines, Kelly. “Popular Culture and Public Scholarship in the South.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 1/2, Winter/Spring2015, pp. 24-27.

Modern Fiction Studies

  • Cooper, L. “Eating at the Empire Table: Cormac Mccarthy’s The Road and the Anglo-Irish Gothic.” MFS Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 63 no. 3, 2017, pp. 547-570.

Mosaic

  • Corrigan, John Michael. “Sourceless Sunlight: Faulkner’s Sanctuaryand the Sacrificial Crisis.” Mosaic: an interdisciplinary critical journal, vol. 50 no. 4, 2017, pp. 139-155.
  • Reese, Sam and Alexandra Kingston-Reese. “Teju Cole and Ralph Ellison’s Aesthetics of Invisibility.” Mosaic: an interdisciplinary critical journal, vol. 50 no. 4, 2017, pp. 103-119.
  • Stave, Shirley A. “Growing Up to be a Man: Son Revisited.” Mosaic: an interdisciplinary critical journal, vol. 50 no. 4, 2017, pp. 17-32.

North Carolina Literary Review

  • Wilhelm, Randall. “Expressive Interplay in Words and Images: The Art of Design in the North Carolina Literary Review.” North Carolina Literary Review. Number 26. 2017. 90-104

NOVEL

  • Dubey, Madhu. “Racecraft in American Fiction.” Novel: A Forum on Fiction, vol. 50, no. 3, Nov. 2017, pp. 365-374.
  • DuCille, Ann. “Of Race, Gender, and the Novel; Or, Where in the World Is Toni Morrison?.” Novel: A Forum on Fiction, vol. 50, no. 3, Nov. 2017, pp. 375-387.

Papers on Language & Literature

  • Warfield, Adrienne Akins. “‘In the South Pain Is Segregated’: Waiting Rooms and Medical Ethics in Eudora Welty’s ‘A Worn Path’ and Ernest Gaines’s ‘The Sky Is Gray’.” Papers on Language & Literature, no. 3, 2017, pp. 211- 236.

Poe Studies

  • Gruesser, John and Travis Montgomery. “Scribblers and Scriveners: Poe, Melville’s Bartleby, and Antebellum Literary New York.” Poe Studies, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 19-34.
  • Peeples, Scott. “Poe, Brennan Farm, and the Literary Life.” Poe Studies, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 5-18.
  • Whitley, Edward. “The Southern Origins of Bohemian New York: Edward Howland, Ada Clare and Edgar Allan Poe.” Poe Studies, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 35-49.

Skenè: Journal of Theatre and Drama Studies (University of Verona, Italy)

  • Haynes, Robert W. “Hymnological Dramaturgy as Escape from Ideology in Horton Foote.” Skenè: Journal of Theatre and Drama Studies (University of Verona, Italy) 3.1, 2017, 105-120.

South: A Scholarly Journal

  • Bradley, Regina. N. “Re-Imagining Slavery in the Hip-Hop Imagination.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 3-24.
  • Brandt, Jennifer. “Taste as Emotion: The Synesthetic Body in Monique Truong’s Bitter in the Mouth.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 38-57.
  • Connolly, Andrew. “Not Real Good at Modern Life: Appalachian Pentecostals in the Works of Lee Smith.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 79-100.
  • DeWald, Jaydn. ““I’d sing you a song if I could sing”: Art and Artifice in Ellen Douglas’s Can’t Quit You, Baby.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 58-78.
  • Kim, Joo Ok. “Declining Misery: Rural Florida’s Hmong and Korean Farmers.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 25-37.
  • Raiford, Wanda. “Fantasy and Haiti’s Erasure in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 101-121.
  • Wingard, Leslie. “Laying Down the Rails: Sacred and Secular Groundwork in Zora Neale Hurston’s Jonah’s Gourd Vineand King Vidor’s Hallelujah.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 1, 2016, pp. 122-141.

South Carolina Review

  • Carbaugh, Chris. “Honest Abe, Horticulture, and Candy.” South Carolina Review, vol. 49, no. 2, Spring2017, pp. 118-124.
  • Thompson, Terry W. “‘Hurst of Hurstcote’: Edith Nesbit’s Appropriation of ‘The Fall of the House of Usher.’.” South Carolina Review, no. 2, 2017, p. 103-118.

Southern Cultures

  • Bates, Denise E. “What’s in a Seal?: How a Fish Came to Represent the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 128-133.
  • Bryan, William. D. “Taming the Wild Side of Bonaventure: Tourism and the Contested Southern Landscape.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 2, 2017, pp. 49-74.
  • Graves, Brian. “”Return and Get It”: Developing McLeod Plantation as a Shared Space of Historical Memory.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 2, 2017, pp. 75-96.
  • Hall, Nina Flagler. “A Foodless Neighborhood in a “Foodie” Town: Tracing Scarcity in Asheville’s East End Neighborhood.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 2, 2017, pp. 113-133.
  • Hazel, Forest. “”They Don’t Dig for Coal Here Anymore”: North Carolina’s Coal Glen Mine.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 62-69.
  • Herman, Bernard L. “On Southern Things.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 7-13.
  • Jameson, Jennifer Joy. “Southern Voices: Rhinestone Man.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 79-90.
  • Judt, Daniel. “Cyclorama: An Atlanta Monument.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 2, 2017, pp. 23-48.
  • Klein, Shana. “Those Golden Balls Down Yonder Tree: Oranges and the Politics of Reconstruction in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Florida.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 30-38.
  • McKee, Seth C. “Race and Subregional Persistence in a Changing South.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 2, 2017, pp. 134-159.
  • Porter, Trista Reis. “Bridging Voice and Identity: Chris Luther’s Bridge Bowland the Seagrove Tradition.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 70-78.
  • Ridder-Beardsley, Emily. “Driving a New Perspective: Automobiles in the Photographs of Reverend L. O. Taylor.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 118-127.
  • Rosengarten, Dale. “Sanctified by War: A Tale of Two Silver Bowls.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 47-53.
  • Sharpless, Rebecca. “Going Dutch: A Pot’s Place in the Southern Kitchen.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 111-117.
  • Smith, Ryan. K. “Philip N. J. Wythe’s Headstone.” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 39-46.
  • Tell, Dave. “Can a Gas Station Remember a Murder?” Southern Cultures, vol. 23 no. 3, 2017, pp. 54-61.

 Southern Quarterly

  • Alexander, Jonathan. “Outside Within: Growing Up Gay in the South.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 3, 2017, pp. 10-22.
  • Eckard, Paula Gallant. “Lost Childhood in Southern Literature.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 3, 2017, pp. 75-93.
  • Hakala, Laura. “Beyond the Big House: Southern Girlhoods in Louise Clarke Pyrnelle’s Diddie, Dumps, and Tot.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 3, 2017, pp. 23-40.
  • Hanlon, Tina L. “Struggles for Life, Liberty, and Land: Appalachian Mining Communities in Children’s Literature.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 3, 2017, pp. 94-113.
  • Joy, Joanne. “Lessons at the Southern Table: Childhood and Food in Dori Sanders’s Clover.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 3, 2017, pp. 114-125.
  • Just, Sascha (Alexandra). “Black Indians of New Orleans—”Won’t Bow Down, Don’t Know How”.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 72-87.
  • Knepper, Steven E. “The Nation’s Bioregion: The South in Pare Lorentz’s The River.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 88-103.
  • Simon, Julia. “Repudiation and Redemption in Go Down, Moses: Accounting, Settling, Gaming the System, and Justice.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 30-54.
  • Susina, Jan. “Alabama Bound: Reading Harper Lee’s To Kill a MockingbirdWhile Southern.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 3, 2017, pp. 62-74.
  • Tarr, Anita. “Preserving Southern Culture: Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings’s The Yearling.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 3, 2017, pp. 42-61.
  • Tribbett, Marcus Charles. “Three Williams and a Subversive Text: Collaboration, Communal Agency, and Resistant Identities in Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom(1860).” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 9-29.
  • West, Mark I. “Childhood in the New South as Reflected in Children’s Literature: A Forum Featuring Lorinda B. Cohoon, Martha Hixon, Dianne Johnson-Feelings, Kenneth Kidd, Jennifer M. Miskec, Anita W. Moss, Claudia Nelson, M. Tyler Sasser, and Laureen Tedesco.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 54 no. 3, 2017, pp. 126-150.
  • Wood, Derek R. “”Art had almost left them”: Les CenellesSociety of Arts and Letters, the Dillard Project, and the Legacy of Afro-Creole Arts in New Orleans.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 55-71.

Southern Spaces

  • Bowen, Elliot. “Before Tuskegee: Public Health and Venereal Disease in Hot Springs, Arkansas.” Southern Spaces. 31 October, 2017
  • Nunes, Mark. “Ways of Unseeing: Crowdsourcing the Frame in Roger May’s Looking at Appalachia.” Southern Spaces. 9 November, 2017.
  • Peterson, Dawn. “Indians in the Family: Adoption and the Politics of Antebellum Expansion.” Southern Spaces. 14 September, 2017.

Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South

  • Belden-Adams, Kris. “Mixed Intentions and Interpretations in Dorthea Lange’s Plantation Owner, Mississippi Delta Photographs.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 24, no. 1, Spring/Summer2017, pp. 1-25.
  • Mueller, Stefanie. “State, Law, and Violence in in Charles Chestnutt’s the Marrow of Tradition.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 24, no. 1, Spring/Summer2017, pp. 51-75.
  • Schlabach, Elizabeth Schroeder. “Choice Seatmate” or Judith Stewart, Jet’s September 7, 1955 Beauty of the Week: Sexuality, Modern Black Beauty Discourse, and the Reach for Civil Rights.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 24, no. 1, Spring/Summer2017, pp. 76-94.
  • Wilson, Paul J. “Shipbuilding on the Bayou in the Age of Big Oil: The Shipyards of Southeast Louisiana.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 24, no. 1, Spring/Summer2017, pp. 27-50.

Study the South

  • Machado, Isabel. “The Sunbelt South: The 1970s Masculinity Crisis, and the Emergence of the Redneck Nightmare Genre.” Study the South. 19 June, 2017.

Texas Studies in Language and Literature

  • Anderson, Eric Gary and Melanie Benson Taylor. “The Landscape of Disaster: Hemingway, Porter, and the Soundings of Indigenous Silence.” Texas Studies in Literature & Language, vol. 59, no. 3, Fall2017, pp. 319-352.
  • Vanhoutte, Jacqueline. “Suzan-Lori Parks’s Venus and the Petrarchan Tradition.” Texas Studies in Literature & Language, vol. 59, no. 2, Summer2017, pp. 234-267.

Twentieth-Century Literature

  • Alison, Cheryl. “Writing underground: Ralph Ellison and the Novel.” Twentieth Century Literature, vol. 63, no. 3, 2017, pp. 329-358.
  • Belletto, Steven. “Julian Mayfield and Alternative Civil Rights literatures.” Twentieth Century Literature, vol. 63, no. 2, 2017, pp. 115-140.
  • Chase, Greg. “Acknowledging Addie’s pain: language, Wittgenstein, and As I Lay Dying.” Twentieth Century Literature, vol. 63, no. 2, 2017, pp. 167-190.

 

Academic Presses:

Cambridge UP

  • Hay, John. Postapocalyptic Fantasies in Antebellum American Literature. Cambridge Studies in American Literature and Culture. Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2017

Cascade Books

  • Wilson, Jessica Hooten. Giving the Devil His Due: Demonic Authority in the Fiction of Flannery O’Connor and Fyodor Dostoevsky. Eugene, OR. Cascade Books, 2017.

Chicago UP

  • Schmidt, Christopher W. The Sit-Ins Protest and Legal Change in the Civil Rights Era. Chicago: Chicago UP, 2018
  • Schoenfeld, Heather. Building the Prison State: Race and the Politics of Mass Incarceration. Chicago: Chicago UP, 2018.

Duke UP

  • Mahler, Anne Garland. From the Tricontinental to the Global South: Race, Radicalism, and Transnational Solidarity. Durham, Duke UP, 2018.
  • Morrison Melanie S. Murder on Shades Mountain: The Legal Lynching of Willie Peterson and the Struggle for Justice in Jim Crow Birmingham. Durham, Duke UP, 2018.
  • Schalk, Sami. Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women’s Speculative Fiction. Durham, Duke UP, 2018.
  • Tinsley, Omise’eke Natasha. Ezili’s Mirrors: Imagining Black Queer Genders. Durham, Duke UP, 2018.
  • Warren, Calvin. Ontological Terror: Blackness, Nihilism, and Emancipation. Durham, Duke UP, 2018.
  • Williams, Bianca C. The Pursuit of Happiness: Black Women, Diasporic Dreams, and the Politics of Emotional Transnationalism. Durham, Duke UP, 2018.
  • Zaborowska, Magdalena J. Me and My House: James Baldwin’s Last Decade in France. Durham, Duke UP, 2018.

Lexington Books/ Rowman & Littlefield

  • Moore, Cecelia. The Federal Theatre Project in the American South: The Carolina Playmakers and the Quest for American Drama. Lexington Books, 2017.

Louisiana State UP

  • Bellows, Barbara L. Two Charlestonians at War: The Civil War Odysseys of a Lowcountry Aristocrat and a Black Abolitionist. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Cox, Karen and Sarah E. Gardner, eds. Reassessing the 1930s South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Dobie, Ann Brewster. Voices from Louisiana: Profiles of Contemporary Writers. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Dubrulle, Hugh. Ambivalent Nation: How Britain Imagined the American Civil War. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Girard, Jeffrey S. Archaeology and the Native People of Northwest Louisiana. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Gordon, Lesley J. A Broken Regiment: The 16th Connecticut’s Civil War. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Hinrichsen, Lisa, Gina Caison, and Stephanie Rountree, eds. Small-screen Souths Region, Identity, and the Cultural Politics of Television. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2017.
  • Marshall, James P. The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and the Kennedy Administration, 1960-1964: A History in Documents. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Moore, Leonard N. The Defeat of Black Power: Civil Rights and the National Black Political Convention of 1972. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018
  • Quigley, Paul D., ed. The Civil War and the Transformation of American Citizenship. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Rolph, Stephanie R. Resisting Equality: The Citizens’ Council, 1954-1989. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Squint, Kirstin L. LeAnne Howe at the Intersections of Southern and Native American Literature. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Stern, Walter. Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764-1960. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Wiegand, Wayne A. and Shirley A. Wiegand. The Desegregation of Public Libraries in the Jim Crow South: Civil Rights and Local Activism. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.
  • Wilson, Jessica Hooten. Reading Walker Percy’s Novels. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2018.

McFarland

  • Lewis, Janaka Bowman. Freedom Narratives of African American Women: A Study of 19th Century Writings. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2017
  • Mazzeno, Laurence W. James Lee Burke: A Literary Companion. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2017

W.W. Norton

  • West, Robert M, ed. The Complete Poems of A.R. Ammons: Vol. 1, 1955–1977; Vol. 2, 1978–2005. New York, New York. W. Norton & Company, 2017

Ohio State UP

  • Campbell, Eddie. The Goat-Getters: Jack Johnson, the Fight of the Century, and How a Bunch of Raucous Cartoonists Reinvented Comics. Columbus, OH: Ohio State UP, 2018.
  • Green, Tara T. Reimagining the Middle Passage: Black Resistance in Literature, Television, and Song. Columbus, OH: Ohio State UP, 2018.
  • Wilson, Jessica Hooten. Walker Percy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and the Search for Influence. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 2017.
  • Manzella, Abigail G. H. Migrating Fictions: Gender, Race, and Citizenship in U.S. Internal Displacements. Columbus, OH: Ohio State UP, 2018.

Ohio UP

  • Welch, Wendy. Fall or Fly: The Strangely Hopeful Story of Foster Care and Adoption in Appalachia. Athens, OH: Ohio UP, 2018.

Oxford UP

  • Barnard, John Levi. Empire of Ruin: Black Classicism and American Imperial Culture. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2017.
  • Finseth, Ian. The Civil War Dead and American Modernity. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2018.
  • Germana, Michael. Ralph Ellison, Temporal Technologist. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2018.

U of Alabama P

  • Atchison, Jarrod. A War of Words: The Rhetorical Leadership of Jefferson Davis. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: The University of Alabama Press. 2017.
  • Baires, Sarah E. Land of Water, City of the Dead: Religion and Cahokia’s Emergence. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: The University of Alabama Press. 2017.
  • Olliff, Martin T. Getting Out of the Mud: The Alabama Good Roads Movement and Highway Administration, 1898–1928. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: The University of Alabama Press. 2017.
  • Shores, Elizabeth Findley. Earline’s Pink Party: The Social Rituals and Domestic Relics of a Southern Woman. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: The University of Alabama Press. 2017.
  • Steere, Benjamin A. The Archaeology of Houses and Households in the Native Southeast. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: The University of Alabama Press. 2017.
  • Thompson, Douglas E. Richmond’s Priests and Prophets: Race, Religion, and Social Change in the Civil Rights Era. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: The University of Alabama Press. 2017.
  • Wonham, Henry B. and Lawrence Howe, eds. Mark Twain and Money: Language, Capital, and Culture. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: The University of Alabama Press. 2017.

U of California P

  • Dale. The Jazz Bubble: Neoclassical Jazz in Neoliberal Culture. Oakland, California: University of California Press, 2018.
  • Hunter, Marcus Anthony and Zandria Robinson. Chocolate Cities: The Black Map of American Life. Oakland, California: University of California Press, 2018.
  • Powe Jr., Lucas A. America’s Lone Star Constitution: How Supreme Court Cases from Texas Shape the Nation. Oakland, California: University of California Press, 2018.

U of Georgia P

  • Bryan, William D. The Price of Permanence: Nature and Business in the New South. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Cutter, Martha J. and Cathy J. Schlund-Vials, eds. Redrawing the Historical Past: History, Memory, and Multiethnic Graphic Novels. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Emancipations. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Haynes, Joshua S. Patrolling the Border: Theft and Violence on the Creek-Georgia Frontier, 1770–1796. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Jones-Branch, Cherisse and Gary T. Edwards. Arkansas Women: Their Lives and Times. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Lamb, Gordon. Widespread Panic in the Streets of Athens, Georgia. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Nystrom, Justin A. Creole Italian: Sicilian Immigrants and the Shaping of New Orleans Food Culture. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Rankin, Julian. Catfish Dream: Ed Scott’s Fight for His Family Farm and Racial Justice in the Mississippi Delta. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.
  • Stewart, Whitney Nell And John Garrison Marks, eds. Race and Nation in the Age of
  • Sutter, Paul S. and Paul M. Pressly, eds. Coastal Nature, Coastal Culture: Environmental Histories of the Georgia Coast. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2017.

U of Illinois P

  • Baker, Courtney R. Humane Insight: Looking at Images of African American Suffering and Death. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2017.
  • Godfrey, Mollie and Vershawn Ashanti Young. Neo-Passing: Performing Identity after Jim Crow. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2018.
  • Graham, Sandra Jean. Spirituals and the Birth of a Black Entertainment Industry. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2018.
  • Mullen, Patrick B. Right to the Juke Joint: A Personal History of American Music. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2018.
  • Vogel, Joseph. James Baldwin and the 1980s: Witnessing the Reagan Era. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2018.
  • Winans, Robert B. Banjo Roots and Branches. Urbana-Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 2018.

U of Minnesota P

  • Schneider, Aaron. Renew Orleans?: Globalized Development and Worker Resistance after Katrina. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2018.

U of North Carolina P

  • Broadwater, Jeff. George Mason, Forgotten Founder. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Brown, Thomas J. Civil War Canon: Sites of Confederate Memory in South Carolina. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Coggeshall, John M. Liberia, South Carolina: An African American Appalachian Community. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Dilbeck, D. H. Frederick Douglass: America’s Prophet. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Franklin, Sara B. Edna Lewis: At the Table with an American Original. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Gershenhorn, Jerry. Louis Austin and the Carolina Times: A Life in the Long Black Freedom Struggle. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Greene, A. Wilson and Gary W. Gallagher A Campaign of Giants–The Battle for Petersburg (Volume 1: From the Crossing of the James to the Crater). Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Hartog, Hendrik. The Trouble with Minna: A Case of Slavery and Emancipation in the Antebellum North. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Hess, Earl J. The Battle of Ezra Church and the Struggle for Atlanta. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Knapp, Courtney Elizabeth. Constructing the Dynamo of Dixie: Race, Urban Planning, and Cosmopolitanism in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Malka, Adam. The Men of Mobtown: Policing Baltimore in the Age of Slavery and Emancipation. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Mathisen, Erik. The Loyal Republic: Traitors, Slaves, and the Remaking of Citizenship in Civil War America. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • McIlvenna, Noeleen. A Very Mutinous People: The Struggle for North Carolina, 1660-1713. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Perry, Imani. May We Forever Stand: A History of the Black National Anthem. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Quintana, Ryan A. Making a Slave State: Political Development in Early South Carolina. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Reaser, Jeffrey, Eric Wilbanks, Karissa Wojcik, and Walt Wolfram, eds. Language Variety in the New South: Contemporary Perspectives on Change and Variation. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Simpson, Bland. Two Captains from Carolina: Moses Grandy, John Newland Maffitt, and the Coming of the Civil War. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Stowe, Steven M. Keep the Days: Reading the Civil War Diaries of Southern Women. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Walsh, Camille. Racial Taxation: Schools, Segregation, and Taxpayer Citizenship, 1869–1973. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Welch, Kimberly M. Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.
  • Zogry, Kenneth Joel. Print News and Raise Hell: The Daily Tar Heel and the Evolution of a Modern University. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2018.

U of South Carolina P

  • Bell, Karen Cook. Claiming Freedom: Race, Kinship, and Land in Nineteenth-Century Georgia. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Blackman, Lynne, ed. Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Clark, Katherine. My Exaggerated Life: Pat Conroy. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Dufford, William E. My Tour through the Asylum: A Southern Integrationist’s Memoir.. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2017.
  • Fraser, Jr., Walter J. Savannah in the New South: From the Civil War to the Twenty-First Century. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Greene, Harlan. The Damned Don’t Cry—They Just Disappear: The Life and Works of Harry Hervey. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Gretlund, Jan Nordby. Southern Writers Bear Witness: Interviews. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Johnson, Danielle N. Understanding Lee Smith. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Molloy, Marie S. Single, White, Slaveholding Women in the Nineteenth-Century American South. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Morris, Shelia R., ed. Southern Perspectives on the Queer Movement: Committed to Home. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Seigler, Robert S. The Best Gun in the World: George Woodward Morse and the South Carolina State Military Works. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2017.
  • Stephens, Rachel. Selling Andrew Jackson: Ralph E. W. Earl and the Politics of Portraiture. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Wilhelm, Randall and Zackary Vernon, eds. Summoning the Dead: Essays on Ron Rash. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Williams III, Roy and Alexander Lucas Lofton. Rice to Ruin: The Jonathan Lucas Family in South Carolina, 1783–1929. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.
  • Witzig, Fred E. Sanctifying Slavery and Politics in South Carolina: The Life of the Reverend Alexander Garden, 1685–1756. Columbia, SC: U of South Carolina P, 2018.

U of Tennessee P

  • Alcocer, Rudyard J., Kristen Block, and Dawn Duke, eds. Celluloid Chains: Slavery in the Americas through Film. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2018.
  • Amis, John M. and Paul M. Wright, eds. Race, Economics, and the Politics of Educational Change: The Dynamics of School District Consolidation in Shelby County, Tennessee. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2018.
  • Brad Bannon and John Vanderheide, eds. Cormac McCarthy’s Violent Destinies: The Poetics of Determinism and Fatalism. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2018.
  • Byrd, Travis Sutton. Tangled: Organizing the Southern Textile Industry, 1930–1934. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2018.
  • Mckinley, Shepherd W. and Steven Sabol, eds. North Carolina’s Experience during the First World War. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2018.
  • Oakley, Christopher Arris. New South Indians: Tribal Economics and the Eastern Band of Cherokee in the Twentieth Century. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2018.
  • Powell, Dave. Decisions at Chickamauga: The Twenty-Four Critical Decisions That Defined the Battle. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2018.
  • Tribe, Ivan. Folk Music in Overdrive: A Primer on Traditional Country and Bluegrass Artists. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2018.

U of Virginia P

  • Edds, Margaret. We Face the Dawn: Oliver Hill, Spottswood Robinson, and the Legal Team That Dismantled Jim Crow. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2018.
  • Kingsley, Karen and Lake Douglas. Buildings of New Orleans. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2018.
  • Maizlish, Stephen E. A Strife of Tongues: The Compromise of 1850 and the Ideological Foundations of the American Civil War. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2018.
  • McDonald, Robert M. S. Thomas Jefferson’s Military Academy: Founding West Point. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2018.
  • Wilson, Gaye S. Jefferson on Display: Attire, Etiquette, and the Art of Presentation. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2018.
  • Young, M. Neely. Trans-Atlantic Sojourners: The Story of an Americo-Liberian Family. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2018.

UP of Florida

  • Capouya, John. Florida Soul: From Ray Charles to KC and the Sunshine Band. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.
  • Ellis, Reginald K. Between Washington and Du Bois: The Racial Politics of James Edward Shepard. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.
  • Fairclough, Adam. The Revolution That Failed: Reconstruction in Natchitoches. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2018.
  • Fox, Regis M. Resistance Reimagined: Black Women’s Critical Thought as Survival. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.
  • Frank, Andrew K. Before the Pioneers: Indians, Settlers, Slaves, and the Founding of Miami. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.
  • Graham, Thomas. Silent Films in St. Augustine. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.
  • Hawkins, Karen M. Everybody’s Problem: The War on Poverty in Eastern North Carolina. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2017.
  • Mulrooney, Margaret M. Race, Place, and Memory: Deep Currents in Wilmington, North Carolina. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2018.
  • Street, Joe and Henry Knight Lozano, eds. The Shadow of Selma. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2018.

UP of Mississippi

  • Bagget, Ashley. Intimate Partner Violence in New Orleans: Gender, Race, and Reform, 1840–1900. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Brian D. Behnken, Gregory D. Smithers, and Simon Wendt, eds. Black Intellectual Thought in Modern America: A Historical Perspective. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Claxton, Mae Miller and Julia Eichelberger, eds. Teaching the Works of Eudora Welty: Twenty-First-Century Approaches. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Cohen, Ronald D. and David Bonner. Selling Folk Music: An Illustrated History. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Davis, David A. World War I and Southern Modernism. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Goertzen, Chris. George P. Knauff’s Virginia Reels and the History of American Fiddlin. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Kubik, Jazz Transatlantic, Volume I: The African Undercurrent in Twentieth- Century Jazz Culture. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Kubik, Jazz Transatlantic, Volume II: Jazz Derivatives and Developments in Twentieth-Century Africa. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Pratt, Dorothy Overstreet. Sowing the Wind: The Mississippi Constitutional Convention of 1890. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Ruminski, Jarret. The Limits of Loyalty: Ordinary People in Civil War Mississippi. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Schexnayder, Jessica H. and Mary H. Manhein. Fragile Grounds: Louisiana’s Endangered Cemeteries. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Shawhan, Dorothy. Fannye Cook: Mississippi’s Pioneering Conservationist. Marion Barnwell, ed. and Libby Hartfield. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Smith, Howard Philips. Unveiling the Muse: The Lost History of Gay Carnival in New Orleans. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Stockley, Grif. Black Boys Burning: The 1959 Fire at the Arkansas Negro Boys Industrial School. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Sullivan, Jack. New Orleans Remix. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Ward, Joseph P. European Empires in the American South: Colonial and Environmental Encounters. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.
  • Woodson, Carter G. History, the Black Press, and Public Relations. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2017.