Volume 52, Issue 2
February 2019
Change and New Beginnings Issue

Change and Transparency

By: Amy King and Andy Crank

In last summer’s newsletter, we highlighted how SSSL was transitioning into new leadership—a new president, six executive council members, and a newsletter editor. Since our Society meets for a conference biennially, our leadership changes quickly. Indeed, it is already time to nominate two members to join the executive council—look for an email from our Listserv about how to nominate yourself or other members. 

Over the past few months, the SSSL leadership has worked to make these processes more transparent to members. We encourage everyone to visit the “About Us” page (http://southernlit.org/about-us/) to learn more about SSSL’s mission, constitution, by-laws, and policies. These include long-overdue policies on anti-harassment and anti-bullying. Moreover, the SSSL constitution affirms that the Society is “committed to social equality and critical and rigorous discourse about the U.S. South. We are an anti-racist organization that contests historical revisionism, which white supremacists have used to maintain racial hierarchies, inequality, and injustice. We support scholarship that examines the heterogeneity of both the past and present South and that considers the borders of the region in expansive ways. We encourage dynamic critical dialogue from multiple theoretical and critical perspectives. We support others who advocate for diversity, community, inclusivity, and equality.” 

In last summer’s newsletter, we highlighted how SSSL was transitioning into new leadership—a new president, six executive council members, and a newsletter editor. Since our Society meets for a conference biennially, our leadership changes quickly. Indeed, it is already time to nominate two members to join the executive council—look for an email from our Listserv about how to nominate yourself or other members.

Here, during this movement to create a more transparent Society, we (as editors of this newsletter) are also calling for self-reflexivity. Creating institutional policies alone does not create equity. WantingSSSL to be a better, more welcoming, more fair, just, and equitable space for scholars to investigate the literature and culture of a region cannot be our final response to questions of self-reflexivity. No, the charges laid out by the executive committee and our new president are the beginning of reaching out, of changing. This is a useful first step. But we cannot stop changing—drafting a statement of principles does not remediate systemic problems and harm. 

To move forward, we must ask ourselves difficult questions. So, as Andy transitions off the pages of the newsletter, and as Amy takes up the role as editor, we find ourselves compelled by a charge to examine our priorities—are we invested in the institution, or are we invested in people?  

President’s Column

By: Lisa Hinrichsen

As I started this column, the polar vortex was inching south, bringing with it dangerously frigid temperatures. I’m finishing this note beside an open window letting in a strangely balmy February breeze. It’s dizzying to swing between such extremes: even the trees are confused, opening their buds without caution only to be covered by a swift frost.

In this context of instability and unsustainability, change seems the right theme for this issue of the SSSL newsletter. 2018 was a year of measurable change for the organization. We worked to improve our internet presence, redesigning our webpage and more actively moderating our Facebook group. We also modified and significantly updated our constitution and by-laws to reflect the way SSSL actually works, while also offering community guidelines in a new policies document. 2019 will bring a round of elections, including the selection of our first President-Elect, who will serve in this role for one year before becoming President in 2020. Throughout our work, we have listened to our members’ desires for more transparency and ownership of this Society, and I urge those of you who wish to aid in creating a sustainable, inclusive organization to consider running for a position on the Executive Committee or, if you have experience on the Leadership Council, putting forth your name for the role of President-Elect. We welcome new voices, and I invite you to write to me with your ideas, concerns, and hopes for our organization in this season of change.

Emerging Scholars Organization Update

By:Elizabeth Gardner

The current Emerging Scholars Organization (ESO) executive council has had a productive term so far. This past fall, the ESO hosted a number of events at SAMLA 90, including a panel on “Progress, Radicalism, and the U.S. South”; two panels on “Queering the U.S. South”; an ESO business meeting; and a social event that allowed emerging scholars to meet and connect with one another. In fact, creating connections drives a number of our ongoing initiatives. To that end, we have created a listserv for emerging scholars, which will make it easier for us to share resources and information. If you identify as an emerging scholar or know someone who might like to be included on the listserv, please let us know at emergingscholarsorg@gmail.com.

We are also working to expand and better define the ESO mentorship program, which helps emerging scholars connect with those more established in the field. The world of academia is often confounding, and these mentorships have proven a wonderful opportunity for mutually beneficial academic relationships. To help facilitate and set expectations for mentor-mentee interactions, the ESO has drafted a handbook, “Mentoring Ethically,” which highlights the many positive aspects of mentorship while also offering some suggestions on how to build a successful mentoring relationship. Look for the guide later this spring. 

To learn more about our work and goals as an organization, Check us out on Facebook, on our webpage, or you can follow us on our newly created Twitterpage, as we discover what public scholarship might look like in the digital age. 

If you identify as an emerging scholar and would like to join our listserv, our mentorship program, or have any questions about how to get involved, please feel free to email us any time at emergingscholarsorg@gmail.com.  

We look forward to connecting with you

Announcements and CFPs 

SSSL Awards

We are proud to call attention to SSSL’s most recent Award Winners. For more information on the awards, please see: http://southernlit.org/awards/

Hugh Holman Award 

The Hugh Holman Award is presented annually to the best work of literary criticism published about the U.S. South or southern writer(s).

Awarded to:

John Wharton Lowe, Calypso Magnolia: The Crosscurrents of Caribbean and Southern Literature (University of North Carolina Press, 2016) 

Richard Beale Davis Award 

The Richard Beale Davis Award is presented every other year at the biennial conference of The Society for the Study of Southern Literature. The Award honors a writer or scholar who has made distinguished lifetime contributions to southern letters.

Awarded to:

Trudier Harris, Distinguished Research Professor at the University of Alabama

Louis D. Rubin, Jr. Prize 

The Louis D. Rubin Prize is awarded for the best article on southern literature published by a society member in a peer-reviewed journal.

Awarded to:

Lara Langer Cohen, “Solomon Northup’s Singing Book.” The African American Review 50.3 (Fall 2017): 259-272.

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Executive Committee Nominations

For Members of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature: 

Two persons complete their terms on the SSSL Executive Committee this year: Mae Claxton and Zackary Vernon. As designated chair of the EC elections committee, I am soliciting candidates who are interested in running for these vacating seats. The positions are for two years, with meetings of the Executive Committee usually taking place electronically or in person at the biennial conferences.

The job of the Executive Committee is to advise the SSSL Leadership Council and the general membership concerning matters of policy and the long-term objectives of the Society.

All SSSL members in good standing are eligible for nomination, including self-nomination. The Society welcomes diverse voices, and I encourage all members who are interested in serving to nominate themselves or other members. 

If you are interested in having a name placed on the ballot, please submit that name and a brief (four- or five-sentence) biographical statement to me (kth@lsu.edu) AND Kathryn McKee (kmckee@olemiss.edu) on or before Friday, March 1, at 5 p.m. PST. The elections committee will then circulate a ballot electronically for voting in March.

If you have questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me. Thanks for your assistance!

Katherine Henninger
Russell B. Long Associate Professor
Department of English
Women’s and Gender Studies
Louisiana State University

Conferences

The Art & Architectural History Department and the new Center for the Study of Slavery at the College of Charleston announce a symposium dedicated to the historic and ongoing relationships between slavery and architecture. We seek papers that critically explore places and times in which slavery was a legal institution, as well as papers that analyze the long-enduring memories and legacies of slavery in architecture, urbanism, and landscapes. Charleston is one of the most important sites of such history in the United States and offers an ideal setting for a confrontation with the ways that the systems and values of slavery are woven into the fabric of a place. The city was built upon the slave trade, launched the Civil War, seethed during Reconstruction, and endured decades of segregation and oppression, both in its historic center and in its modern suburbs. We acknowledge, however, the global nature of slavery and welcome relevant submissions pertaining to any corner of the planet. 

Please email a 300-word abstract and a two-page CV, with the phrase Ruins and Reconstructions written in the subject line, to walkernr@cofc.edu and stiefelb@cofc.edu by April 1, 2019. Send any inquiries to the same addresses. 

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The 2nd Faulkner Studies in the UK Colloquium

Call for Papers

Royal Holloway, University of London

Senate House, London. May 31st, 2019. 

Keynote speaker: Dr Gavan Lennon, Canterbury Christ Church University
(Author of Living Jim Crow: The Segregated Town in Mid-Twentieth Century Southern Fiction [Forthcoming])

This colloquium, the second in the history of the Faulkner Studies in the UK Research Network, invites proposals for twenty-minute papers on any topic related to American modernist author William Faulkner (1897-1962). Panel and/or roundtable proposals are also welcome. All critical approaches to Faulkner’s work are encouraged, including but not limited to the following: 

• Faulkner in relation to the UK, Europe, and the World.

• The influence of European and/or Anglophone literature on Faulkner. 

• Faulkner in relation/comparison to other American writers.

• Faulkner and the notion of “Southernness.”

• The presence of race, slavery, and/or the Jim Crow South in Faulkner.

• The impact of war and/or trauma on Faulkner’s characters.

• Faulkner’s representations of murder, lynching, and violence.

• Faulkner’s narrative voices.

• Faulkner’s reflections on disability in his novels.

• Issues of sexuality, gender, and/or sexually deviant behaviour in Faulkner. 

• Queer readings of Faulkner texts.Faulkner’s depictions of mental illness.

The Network is particularly interested in soliciting papers from scholars which reflect the diversity of Faulkner Studies in terms of gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and institutional affiliation. The Network aims to include a mix of participants from across the career spectrum (from postgraduate students to full professors). All are welcome to apply.

Abstract proposals of 250–300 words, accompanied by a short bio, should be sent to the organizer, Ahmed Honeini, at ahmed.honeini.2015@live.rhul.ac.uk by Sunday April 7th, 2019. Presenters will be notified of acceptance of their papers by Sunday April 14th, 2019.

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Southern Writers/Southern Writing Conference (SW/SW), 
University of Mississippi 18-20 July 2019.

Please share widely and consider joining our facebook group Southern Writers, Southern Writing Graduate Conference

Celebrating its 25th year this summer, the conference invites participants to look back, look forward, and look further. We welcome abstracts for paper and panel proposals that explore southern literature, writers, culture, and key figures. The conference seeks to foster a multi-disciplinary environment, featuring graduate students with an interest in the US South from departments across the humanities and social sciences. Potential topics for discussion include:

Intersections of southern material culture, cultural identity, and literature
Topics in race, gender, class, and identity
The Global South
Southern space and place
Ecocriticism, travel narratives, nature writing, and the southern landscape
Religion, gothic, and the “grotesque”
Southern folklore, sociology, ethnography, geography, biology 
Southern media/popular culture – film, television, music, podcasts, etc.
Letters, diaries, and periodicals
Oral culture, music, and food representation in Southern culture and literature

We also invite creative submissions, including poetry, short stories, novel excerpts, photography, or short films that deal with southern themes or settings. 
Both critical and creative submissions are eligible for the Faulkner Paper Prize and the Colby H. Kullman Award.

Please send a 200–300-word abstract of a critical work or an entire creative work to: swswgradconference@gmail.com. 
The conference reading limit for critical works is 15 minutes. Panel proposals that include three or four participants are also welcome. Please send your submissions as Word attachments and include your university affiliation and a short bio. 
The deadline for submissions is Sunday, 14 April 2019. 
Successful applicants will be notified by mid-May.
For more information, please contact Laura Wilson at: swswgradconference@gmail.com.

Our plenary speaker for the conference this year will be Trudier Harris (Distinguished Research Professor at the University of Alabama), author of From Mammies to Militants: Domestics in Black American Literature (1982), The Power of the Porch: The Storyteller’s Craft in Zora Neale Hurston, Gloria Naylor, and Randall Kenan (1996), and The Scary Mason-Dixon Line: African American Writers and the South (2009).

Also confirmed for the program are: Jaime Harker, professor of English at the University of Mississippi and author of The Lesbian South: Southern Feminists, the Women in Print Movement, and the Queer Literary Canon (2018), and Kiese Laymon, author of the best-selling memoir Heavy (2018).

Southern Writers/Southern Writing is run in conjunction with the annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference. More information about proceedings for the 2019 Faulkner Conference—Faulkner’s Families—is available at the following link: http://www.outreach.olemiss.edu/events/faulkner/

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Pre-MLA Mini-conference:

After the New Southern Studies

Jan 6-8, 2020

Simon Fraser University

Vancouver, British Columbia

The New Southern Studies arose at the turn of the millennium to challenge the southern exceptionalisms of both U.S. American Studies and mainstream southern studies.  Twenty years later, even as historians increasingly emphasize the centrality of race slavery to early capitalism and to the resultant prosperity of prestigious Ivy League and Canadian universities, for example, the impact of the New Southern Studies (NSS) on either of the fields it sought to change remains unclear.  For some in the original generation of NSS scholars, its legacies appear mixed at best.  U.S. American studies still appears more interested in such things as the archipelagic, the oceanic, BDS, and countercultural resistance through rituals than in ongoing national imbrications with, and circulations through, a disavowed “South.”  Meanwhile, much southern studies continues, even as the field has grown to encompass international scholars to whom “the South” appears more typical of the U.S. than not, to tout a distinctive southern identity and “way of life” manifested in music and foodways; in such quarters, the phrase “new southern studies” has more often been redeployed to serve traditional, exceptionalist agendas than to pursue Leigh Anne Duck’s aim of “southern studies without ‘the South.’”  For some younger scholars, however, the picture appears notably less bleak.  These scholars argue, for example, that by moving from including white women writers and writers of color in agrarian models to relying on theorists of color from Martí and Du Bois to Baker, Glissant and Morrison, the new southern studies removed some of the stigma American studies had associated with the region and helped enable a reclamation of southern studies, and of “the South,” for and by progressive scholars of color.

This conference calls for papers that will start to clarify and assess the legacy of the new southern studies.  If the movement failed, what institutional or affective structures, conceptual or political limitations, or intrinsic argumentative flaws prevented its success?  If it succeeded, what now remains to be done?  What would be the next dialectical turn for American studies or southern studies “after the new southern studies”—not simply an American studies with conceptual (if not political) room for red states or a southern studies without “the South,” but a true “after”: the next stage after each of those, had they come to pass?  If the psychoanalytic arm of the new southern studies sought to shift southern studies’ emphasis from defining and celebrating a distinctive southern identity and southern culture to asking why scholars and laypeople invest in doing so (and in perennially asking whether said identity and culture are “in danger of being lost forever”), is it still possible to conceive of those investments in ways other than the pathologies of melancholia, overcompensation for shame, and the narcissism of minor differences?  What might be the legacy of the new southern studies outside literary studies, in sociology, in anthropology, and especially among historians?  Speaking of history, if the new southern studies seems easily historicized in the context of the 90s—NAFTA, anti-essentialism, the transnational turn in American studies, postcolonial theory’s emphasis on hybridity—how do we historicize or contextualize this post-new southern studies moment, and what can an analysis of the pressures of the contemporary moment tell us about the future? 

To minimize carbon budgets and travel expenses for literary scholars, the conference is scheduled in Vancouver for the three days prior to the Modern Language Association convention in Seattle, an easy train or bus ride away.

The program committee consists of Amy Clukey, Jarvis McInnis, Kathryn McKee, Scott Romine, and Jon Smith; abstracts are due September 1, 2019, to Smith at jsa106@sfu.ca.  We hope to expand the proceedings into a substantial volume of essays.

We wish to thank Simon Fraser University’s Department of English and its Office of the Vice President, Academic for financial support of this conference.  As a result of their generosity, the conference registration fee will be waived for all presenters who are graduate students or contingent faculty.

Individual Panels

CFP: William Faulkner Society Open Call for Papers

The William Faulkner Society is issuing an open call for papers for the MLA conference in Seattle, WA on Jan 9-12, 2020. Submit 250-word individual abstracts or panel proposals with panel description, 250-word abstracts, and panelists’ email addresses in Word attachments to Taylor Hagood at thagood@fau.edu.

Deadline for submissions: Friday, 15 March 2019

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CFP: LLC Southern U.S. Forum
Modern Language Association Convention
January 9-12, 2020, Seattle, WA

Are We in a New Southern Literary Renaissance?

The 2020 meeting of the Modern Language Association will mark the one hundred year anniversary of the reprint of H.L. Mencken’s “The Sahara of the Bozart,” in Prejudices, Second Series, the scathing critique of the South as a “vast plain of mediocrity, stupidity, lethargy, almost of dead silence.” His impact on young southern writers was surprisingly inspirational and his words “played a great part in opening up the South to new ideas and instilling the habit of self-criticism,” according to Andrews, Gwin, Harris, and Hobson, who claim that Mencken was “an unlikely midwife for the Southern Renascence of the 1920s and 1930s.” Now, a century later, in an era underscored by terrorism, climate change, and evolving racial tensions, the first two decades of the twenty-first century have also seen an explosion of excellent writing by diverse and talented southern authors. Jesmyn Ward, Natasha Trethewey, and Kiese Laymon have poignantly voiced African American experiences in contemporary Mississippi, while writers such as Ron Rash, Tayari Jones, Karen Russell, Monique Truong, Silas House, James Hannaham, and LeAnne Howe have lyrically and powerfully depicted a variety of ethnic, sexual, and regional concerns. We are seeking 15-minute papers that investigate twenty-first century southern literature in any genre from practically any approach, including criticism and theory about very contemporary literature, discussions of this new literature in longer narratives of literary history, pedagogical approaches to teaching these works, theorizations of how this new southern literature engages in or is engaged by national discourse, and more. In keeping with MLA 2020’s theme of “Being Human,” specifically its call for work that intersects with human rights, special attention will be given to papers that address how writers and critics have responded to old and new threats to the rights of human beings, as well as the relationship of texts and forms of suffering such as slavery, racial oppression, colonialism, and gendered violence. Please send a 250-word abstract and a copy of your CV to Kirstin Squint at ksquint@highpoint.edu by 15 March 2019.

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CFP: LLC Southern U.S. Forum
Modern Language Association Convention
January 9-12, 2020, Seattle, WA

The 2020 meeting of the Modern Language Association will mark the one hundred year anniversary of the reprint of H.L. Mencken’s “The Sahara of the Bozart,” in Prejudices, Second Series, the scathing critique of the South as a “vast plain of mediocrity, stupidity, lethargy, almost of dead silence.” His impact on young southern writers was surprisingly inspirational and his words “played a great part in opening up the South to new ideas  and instilling the habit of self-criticism,” according to Andrews, Gwin, Harris, and Hobson, who claim that Mencken was “an unlikely midwife for the Southern Renascence of the 1920s and 1930s.” Now, a century later, in an era underscored by terrorism, climate change, and evolving racial tensions, the first two decades of the twenty-first century have also seen an explosion of excellent writing by diverse and talented southern authors. Jesmyn Ward, Natasha Trethewey, and Kiese Laymon have poignantly voiced African American experiences in contemporary Mississippi, while writers such as Ron Rash, Tayari Jones, Karen Russell, Monique Truong, Silas House, James Hannaham, and LeAnne Howe have lyrically and powerfully depicted a variety of ethnic, sexual, and regional concerns. We are seeking 15-minute papers that investigate twenty-first century southern literature in any genre from practically any approach, including criticism and theory about very contemporary literature, discussions of this new literature in longer narratives of literary history, pedagogical approaches to teaching these works, theorizations of how this new southern literature engages in or is engaged by national discourse, and more. In keeping with MLA 2020’s theme of “Being Human,” specifically its call for work that intersects with human rights, special attention will be given to papers that address how writers and critics have responded to old and new threats to the rights of human beings, as well as the relationship of texts and forms of suffering such as slavery, racial oppression, colonialism, and gendered violence. Please send a 250-word abstract and a copy of your CV to Kirstin Squint at ksquint@highpoint.edu by 15 March 2019

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CFP: Plantationocene v. Anthropocene: Global South Perspectives
Seeking paper abstracts for a special panel session on the theme of “the human” at the MLA conference in Seattle, WA on Jan 9-12, 2020. Each panelist will present a 15- to 20-minute paper that helps to theorize and contextualize current debates about the name, length, and roles of the human and the plantation in the formation of the present epoch. Open to any topic, especially papers on 19th-21st c. plantation literature from South Asia, Latin America, and Africa (but open to other regions and a broad interpretation of plantations as well). Please send a 250-word abstract, CV, and any queries to Isadora Wagner, West Point (isadora.wagner@westpoint.edu), and Natalie Aikens, Wabash College (nmaikens@go.olemiss.edu), by March 18th, 2019.

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SCMLA 2019 Eudora Welty—Open Topic 

The Eudora Welty Society panel at SCMLA 2019 welcomes proposals for papers on any topic related to Welty’s work, particularly projects that engage with the conference theme, “Pathways: Past, Present, and Future.” Send 250-word abstracts and a short bio to Allison Nick at amnick@go.olemiss.edu by March 31, 2019

The 76th annual South Central Modern Language Association conference will be held in Little Rock, AR, October 24-26, 2019.  Conference information is available at http://www.southcentralmla.org/

Collections & Journals

The editor of Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the Southinvites submission of original manuscripts, which contribute to a greater knowledge and understanding of the American South, to be considered for publication in future volumes of this journal. Such areas include, but are not limited to, literature, history, politics, sociology, geography, anthropology, economics, and historic preservation.

Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the Southis a peer-reviewed journal published twice a year from the Southern Studies Institute. The Department of Criminal Justice, History, and Social Sciences at Northwestern State University houses the institute.

Two copies of previously unpublished manuscripts should be sent to Editor, Southern Studies, 301 Kyser Hall, Northwestern State University, Natchitoches, LA 71497. All manuscripts must be carefully edited before submission, double-spaced, printed on 8 ½ X 11 in. paper. Along with the hard copy, the saved Microsoft Word (preferably) digital file should be submitted electronically, via e-mail or CD. Notes should be placed at the end of the article. It is the author’s responsibility to ensure that manuscripts conform to the guidelines published in The Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) or to guidelines published by the Modern Language Association. Because articles are evaluated anonymously, the author’s name should appear only on the title page of the manuscript. Manuscripts may also be sent electronically to the editor’s e-mail address (pellegrinc@nsula.edu) or to the Southern Studies Institute (so_studies@nsula.edu).

The editor of Southern Studies is also seeking individuals interested in reviewing books for the journal. If you are interested, please see our list of available books at our website, http://cjhss.nsula.edu/southern-studies/, and contact the editor (pellegrinc@nsula.edu).

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CFP: The Tacky South 

As a way to comment on a person’s style, the word “tacky” has distinctly southern origins. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, it first emerged around 1800 as a noun to describe “a poor white of the Southern States from Virginia to Georgia.” Although the OED does not draw connections between this origin and the origins of the adjective describing something “dowdy, shabby; in poor taste, cheap, vulgar,” these definitions suggest a clear link between national stereotypes of region, race, and class and urbane (and northern urban?) notions of taste, class, and sensibility.

This edited collection will use these observations regarding the term’s origin to ask new questions about how southern culture and identity have been and continue to be associated with “tackiness.” For instance, in what ways are questions of taste and class still bound up with regional identification? Or, how do “lowbrow,” popular representations transmit and recreate images of the South and southern history? Should we be suspicious of the celebration and enjoyment of southern tackiness at both the popular and scholarly levels? What power structures emerge from labeling something as “tacky” or the implementation of tackiness as an aesthetic mode? Ranging from the rise in popularity of southern-themed reality shows and tourist attractions, to mainstream media’s attempts to address topics such as slavery and civil rights, often the specters of class, race, and region still linger in contemporary notions of what registers as tacky, particularly in the way it refers to things that are cheap, vulgar, common, and unsophisticated. 

By March 30, 2019, please submit 500-word abstracts and a short, 100-word bio to Katie Burnett, Fisk University (kburnett@fisk.edu) and Monica Miller, Middle Georgia State University (monica.miller@mga.edu). Formal proposals to the publisher will then go out; accepted proposals will be expected to submit a finished essay of ~5,000 to 6,000 words by May 1, 2020. Feel free to send queries with any questions regarding proposals (including feedback on ideas) at any time.

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CFP: SAR Special Issue on the Work of Lorraine Lopez

Lorraine López is a powerful emerging voice in Latinx literature. She has published six books of fiction, including Soy la Avon Lady(winner of the inaugural Miguel Mármol prize for fiction) and Call Me Henri(awarded the Paterson Prize for Young Adult Literature), and she has edited or coedited three essay collections. Her work reflects a variety of concerns, specifically regarding the complex cultural practices of Mexican American communities; it confronts issues of identity and representation, gender, sexuality, class, race, culture, and place, among others. Yet, despite her popular success, there is very little scholarship that exists on her work. 

This special issue will examine López’s exploration of multidisciplinary cultural, political, and social subjects associated with Latinx identities. We welcome essays that interrogate any theme relating to López’s work. 

Submission deadline: May 1, 2019

Length: Manuscripts should be between 6,500 and 8,000 words, inclusive of Notes, Appendices, and Works Cited.

Format: 8th Edition of the MLA Handbook(contact editors for the “SARStyle Sheet for Authors of Manuscripts”)

Submit essays or address questions to Donna Gessell, University of North Georgia, at donna.gessell@ung.edu

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CFP: Special Issue of MFS Modern Fiction Studies
“Literature and Extraction”

Guest Editors: Ashley Dawson and Alok Amatya
Deadline for Submissions: 1 May 2019

What role is literary representation to play in the fight against extraction? What unique capacities might literature have to document extreme extraction and its impact on frontline communities? And to what extent are existing literary genres mutated and even transfigured in the course of struggles over extraction? This special issue of Modern Fiction Studies seeks to explore these momentous questions. 

This special issue of MFS aims to contribute decisively to the burgeoning fields of Environmental and Energy Humanities by investigating the unique capacities of literary representation (and adjacent genres) to represent social struggles linked to extraction and to imagine post-extractivist futures. We hope that, in the process of this inquiry, we will contribute to intersectional struggles for climate justice around the world.

Awards & Fellowships

Applications are being accepted for the 2019 Eudora Welty Research Fellowship. Established by the Eudora Welty Foundation and the Department of Archives and History, the $2,000 fellowship will be awarded to a graduate student for research within the department’s Eudora Welty Collection. The fellowship seeks to nurture scholars at the beginning of their academic careers in order to increase their lifelong interest in, and promote continued academic and public appreciation of, Eudora Welty’s life and works.

“This is the ninth consecutive year the Eudora Welty Foundation has funded the award,” said David Pilcher, director of the MDAH Archives and Record Services Division. “Their generosity makes it possible for yet another highly qualified fellow to travel to the state archives and use these one-of-a-kind materials.”

The stipend may be used for travel, housing, and other expenses during the fellow’s two-week minimum stay in Jackson. For more information or to apply, click here. The deadline is March 1.

The Eudora Welty Collection is the world’s finest collection of materials related to Welty and one of the most varied literary collections in the United States. The collection includes manuscripts, letters, photographs, drawings, essays, and film and video footage that spans Welty’s entire life.

Beginning in 1957, and over the course of more than forty years, Welty donated materials to the department, primarily literary manuscripts and photographs. At her death the remainder of her papers were bequeathed to MDAH and included unpublished manuscripts and 14,000 items of correspondence with family, friends, scholars, young writers, and noted writers.

The collection may be accessed at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building, 200 North Street, Jackson. For more information on the collection or the fellowship, contact Forrest Galey at 601-576-6850 or by email at fgaley@mdah.ms.gov

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Carson McCullers Annual Outstanding Conference Paper Award — The Carson McCullers Society is pleased to invite submissions for its annual prize for Outstanding Conference Paper. This award recognizes the best entry for a scholarly essay on the life and work of Carson McCullers presented at a conference the previous year. Entrants should provide evidence that the paper was presented at a national, regional, or international academic conference during 2018 (January to December) and that the winner is eligible for the award as an active member of the Society. See the Society’s website at https://carsonmccullerssociety.wordpress.com for membership information. Submissions for this blind-judged competition are welcome from all levels of scholars and bear a $100 honorarium and recognition by the Society for the best entry. Please send submissions to Carson McCullers Society President Isadora Wagner (isadora.wagner@westpoint.edu) by Monday, April 8, 2019. The winner will be announced in early May.

Bibliography

If you would like to add your recent work to the next bibliography or have suggestions about journals/presses we should add, please email Will Murray at wpmurray@crimson.ua.edu

Scholarly Journals

African American Review

  • McTaggart, Ursula. “Historical Fiction about John Brown and Male Identity in Radical Movements.” African American Review, vol. 51, no. 2, Summer 2018, pp. 129–142.
  • Murray, Hannah-Rose. “‘It Is All a Thing of the Past’: An Interview with Frederick Douglass, 1886.” African American Review, vol. 51, no. 2, Summer 2018, pp. 81–93.
  • Wyman, Sarah. “Percival Everett’s Truth-Telling Fictions in Word and Image.” African American Review, vol. 51, no. 2, Summer 2018, pp. 111–127.

American Indian Quarterly

  • Peters, Brian. “Fighting Isolation: How Four Native Women Created Change at UNC-Chapel Hill.” American Indian Quarterly, vol. 42, no. 3, Summer 2018, pp. 344–374. 

American Literary History

  • Bentley, Nancy. “Reconstruction and the Cruel Optimism of Citizenship.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 608-615.
  • Castronovo, Russ. “Deconstructing Reconstruction.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 616-626. 
  • Claybaugh, Amanda. “Reconstruction Today: A Commentary.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 627-632.
  • DeLombard, Jeannine Marie. “Debunking Dehumanization.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 4, 2018, pp. 799-810.
  • Diffley, Kathleen. “Numbered, Numbered: Commemorating the Civil War Dead in Woolson’s “Rodman the Keeper”.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 488-507.
  • Fagan, Benjamin. “The Fragments of Black Reconstruction.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 450-465. 
  • Folsom, Ed. ““A Yet More Terrible and More Deeply Complicated Problem”: Walt Whitman, Race, Reconstruction, and American Democracy.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 531-558.
  • Gardner, Eric. “African American Literary Reconstructions and the “Propaganda of History”.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 429-449.
  • Gillman, Susan. “Reconstruction and Forgettery.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 633-641.
  • Marrs, Cody. “Three Theses on Reconstruction,” American Literary History, Volume 30, Issue 3, 1 September 2018, Pages 407–428
  • Renker, Elizabeth. “What Is “Reconstruction Poetry”?” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 508-530.
  • Schroeder, Jonathan D. S. “What Was Black Nostalgia?” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 4, 2018, pp. 653-676.
  • Sweet, Timothy. “Reconstruction Georgic and Vernacular Voice Poetry.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 466-487. 
  • Thomas, Brook. “Reconstruction and World War I: The Birth of What Sort of Nation(s)?” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 559-583.
  • Thomas, Rhondda Robinson. “Reconstruction, Public Memory, and the Making of Clemson University on John C. Calhoun’s Fort Hill Plantation.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 584-607.
  • Weisenburger, Steven. “Reconstructions.” American Literary History, vol. 30 no. 3, 2018, pp. 642-651.

American Literature

  • Carrington, André. “Desiring Blackness: A Queer Orientation to Marvel’s Black Panther, 1998–2016.” American Literature 1 June 2018; 90 (2): 221–250.
  • Edmunds, Susan. Houses of Contention: Tar Baby and EssenceAmerican Literature 1 September 2018; 90 (3): 613–641.
  • Grace, Daniel. “Infidel America: Puritan Legacy and Antebellum Religious Persecution in Frederick Douglass’s Transatlantic Speeches, 1841–49.” American Literature 1 December 2018; 90 (4): 723–752. 
  • Griffiths, Timothy Marshall. “Into the Morass: Chesnutt, Antinormativity, and the Queer Politics of Early Jim Crow Literature.” American Literature 1 September 2018; 90 (3): 495–522.

American Studies

  • Child, Benjamin S. “Fields of Progress: The Mechanization of Agriculture in Days of Heaven.” American Studies, vol. 57 no. 1, 2018, pp. 79-102.

Children’s Literature Association Quarterly

  • Hakala, Laura. “Back to the Cabin: Race, Space, and Girlhood in Mary White Ovington’s Hazel.” Children’s Literature Association Quarterly, vol. 43, no. 2, 2018, 164-182.

Cormac McCarthy Journal

  • Brummer, Jamie. “Geography, Genre, and Gender: Billy Parham’s Crossings and the Search for American Masculinity.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 16 no. 2, 2018, pp. 170-188
  • Elmore, Rick & Elmore, Jonathan. “‘You can stay here with your papa and die or you can go with me’: The Ethical Imperative of The Road.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 16 no. 2, 2018, pp. 133-148. 
  • Hillier, Russell M. “Two Men in a Trickbag: White, Black, and the Operation of Schopenhauerian Ethics in Cormac McCarthy’s The Sunset Limited.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 16 no. 2, 2018, pp. 104-132. 
  • O’ Sullivan, James Stephen. “Cormac McCarthy’s Allegories of Fragmentation.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 16 no. 2, 2018, pp. 149-169.

Early American Literature

  • Doolen, Andy. “Claiming Indigenous Space: John Dunn Hunter and the Fredonian Rebellion.” Early American Literature, vol. 53 no. 3, 2018, pp. 685-712.
  • Round, Phillip H. “Mississippian Contexts for Early American Studies.” Early American Literature, vol. 53 no. 2, 2018, pp. 445-473.

Edgar Allan Poe Review

  • Bayer, Ellen M.”The Ecocritical Implications of Downing’s Influence on Poe’s Landscape Aesthetic.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 19 no. 2, 2018, pp. 250-273. 
  • Chu, Tsai-Yi. “Influence of Blair on Poe’s Gothicism: The Style of Terror and Horror in Poe’s Early Woman-Centered Tales.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 19 no. 2, 2018, pp. 177-191.
  • Claywell, Gina. “”A worn, weary, discontented look”: The Influence of West Point and the Hudson River Valley on Poe.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 19 no. 2, 2018, pp. 137-152. 
  • Ehrlich, Heyward. “A Walk Up Nassau Street: Poe’s Literary New York in the 1840s.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 19 no. 2, 2018, pp. 233-249.
  • Hammond, Alexander. “The Folio Club Collection and the Silver Fork School: Perspectives on Poe’s Framestory in Recent Scholarship.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 19 no. 2, 2018, pp. 153-176.
  • Robinson, David M.”Influencing Daniel Hoffman: Eureka and the Seven Poes.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 19 no. 2, 2018, pp. 274-286. 
  • Shaffer-Koros, Carole. “Edgar Allan Poe and Eugene Sue: A Fraught Authorial Relationship.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 19 no. 2, 2018, pp. 192-205. 
  • Sweeney, Susan Elizabeth. “Death, Decay, and the Daguerreotype’s Influence on “The Black Cat”.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 19 no. 2, 2018, pp. 206-232.

Eudora Welty Review

  • Brinkmeyer, Robert H., Jr.”Murder and Rape: Reading Flannery O’Connor alongside Eudora Welty.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 10, 2018, pp. 89-111.
  • Draucker, Shannon. “Alternative Corporealities in “June Recital”: Eudora Welty’s Queering of Virgie Rainey and Miss Eckhart.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 10, 2018, pp. 69-87. 
  • Harrison, Rebecca L. “The Maid of Orléans at the Palace of Pleasure: Welty’s “The Purple Hat” and the Emblematic Nature of Violence.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 10, 2018, pp. 13-41. 
  • McMahand, Donnie & Murphy, Kevin. ““Whose Music Was It?”: Unaccountable Art and Uncontainable Sex in Langston Hughes’s “Home” and Eudora Welty’s “June Recital”.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 10, 2018, pp. 43-67.
  • Moore, Kelsey E.”“As if a rabbit had run over her grave”: Gothic Girlhood in Eudora Welty’s Delta Wedding.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 10, 2018, pp. 113-140. 

Faulkner Journal

  • Autry, Thea J. “‘As out of a Seer’s Crystal Ball’: The Racialized Gaze in William Faulkner’s Intruder in the Dust.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 30, no. 2, Fall 2016, pp. 19–39. 
  • Berliner, Jonathan. “Borrowed Books: Bodies and the Materials of Writing in the Sound and the Fury.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 30, no. 2, Fall 2016, pp. 3–17. 
  • Harding, James. “Sweating on the Small Stuff: The Materiality of Form in Faulkner’s as I Lay Dying.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 30, no. 2, Fall 2016, pp. 41–67. 
  • Howard, Christian. “Recreating Faulkner’s Fictional World: The Publication of the Chronology and Genealogy in Absalom, Absalom!” Faulkner Journal, vol. 30, no. 2, Fall 2016, pp. 83–99.
  • Miles, Caroline. “The Right to Eat: Money, Labor, and Commodification in Faulkner’s If I Forget Thee, Jerusalem.” Faulkner Journal, vol. 30, no. 2, Fall 2016, pp. 69–82. 

Flannery O’Connor Review

  • Davis, Doug. “Introduction to Special Feature, Bombs Satellites, Excavators, and Tractors: Exploring the Technological Relics of the New South in O’Connor’s Fiction.” Flannery O’Connor Review, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp. 76-77. 
  • Donahoo, Robert. “Making Moonshine: O’Connor’s Use of Regional Culture in The Violent Bear It Away.” Flannery O’Connor Review, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp.1-14.
  • Grant, Virginia. “Fellow Travelers: Flannery O’Connor and Science in Cold War America.” Flannery O’Connor Review, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp. 78-92. 
  • Harris, Carole. “Grace Lee Unveiled:The ‘Pleasant Lady’ in Flannery O’Connor’s ‘Revelation’: Maryat Lee Talks Back.” Flannery O’Connor Review, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp. 30-55. 
  • Kerr, Carolyn. “Survival of a Favorite.” Flannery O’Connor Review, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp. 70-75.
  • Michaels, Ramsey. “The Same Kind of Horns?: O’Connor and J.F. Powers.” Flannery O’Connor Review, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp. 56-69.
  • Owens, James. “Allis-Chalmers, 1953: A Photo-Essay” Flannery O’Connor, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp. 111-135.
  • Piggford, George. “Flannery O’Connor’s Excavator and Dante’s Lucifer in ‘A View of the Woods.’” Flannery O’Connor Review, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp. 93-110.
  • Shumaker, Peggy. “On Taking Our Time with Flannery O’Connor.” Flannery O’Connor Review, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp. 15-25.
  • Whitt, Margaret Earley. “Sloppiness in Scholarship Is “Odd”:Beware Attributions to O’Connor.” Flannery O’Connor Review, vol. 16, Aug. 2018, pp. 147-148.

Global South

  • Claudio, Lisandro E. “Defending Liberalism in the Global South: Notes from Duterte’s Philippines.” The Global South, vol. 11, no. 2, 2017, pp. 92–107. 
  • Dainotto, Roberto. “South by Chance: Southern Questions on the Global South.” The Global South, vol. 11, no. 2, 2017, pp. 39–53.
  • Demir, Ipek. “The Global South as Foreignization: The Case of the Kurdish Diaspora in Europe.” The Global South, vol. 11, no. 2, 2017, pp. 54–70.
  • Freeman, Dena. “The Global South at the UN: Using International Politics to Re-Vision the Global.” The Global South, vol. 11, no. 2, 2017, pp. 71–91.
  • Kloß, Sinah Theres. “The Global South as Subversive Practice: Challenges and Potentials of a Heuristic Concept.” The Global South, vol. 11, no. 2, 2017, pp. 1–17.
  • Schneider, Nina. “Between Promise and Skepticism: The Global South and Our Role as Engaged Intellectuals.” The Global South, vol. 11, no. 2, 2017, pp. 18–38.

Journal of African American Studies

  • Alfonso, Moya L., et al. “The Willow Hill Community Education Assessment: Assessing the Education Needs of Children in a Former Slave Community.” Journal of African American Studies, vol. 22, no. 2/3, Sept. 2018, pp. 191–204.
  • Henderson, Errol A. “Missing the Revolution Beneath Their Feet: The Significance of the Slave Revolution of the Civil War to the Black Power Movement in the USA.” Journal of African American Studies, vol. 22, no. 2/3, Sept. 2018, pp. 174–190.
  • Ikuenobe, Polycarp. “The Practical and Experiential Reality of Racism: Carter’s and Corlett’s Realism About Race and Racism.” Journal of African American Studies, vol. 22, no. 4, Dec. 2018, pp. 373–392.
  • Jamieson, Erin. “Systemic Racism as a Living Text: Implications of Uncle Tom’s Cabin as a Fictionalized Narrative of Present and Past Black Bodies.” Journal of African American Studies, vol. 22, no. 4, Dec. 2018, pp. 329–344.
  • Mehrvand, Ahad. “Richard Wright’s Personal and Literary Responses to Jim Crowism.” Journal of African American Studies, vol. 22, no. 2/3, Sept. 2018, pp. 218–235.
  • Morris, Tiyi M. “(Un)Learning Hollywood’s Civil Rights Movement: A Scholar’s Critique.” Journal of African American Studies, vol. 22, no. 4, Dec. 2018, pp. 407–419.

Journal of American Studies

  • Hester, Diarmuid. “Highway to Hell? Images of the American Road in Kelly Reichardt’s Old Joy, Wendy and Lucy, and Meek’s Cutoff.” Journal of American Studies, vol. 52, no. 3, 2018, pp. 810–827.

MELUS

  • Burrell, Julie. “Alice Childress’s Wedding BandA Love/Hate Story in Black and White and the Black Feminist Nation.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 43 no. 2, 2018, pp. 78-105. 
  • Carr, Ryan. “Lyric X-Marks: Genre and Self-Determination in the Harp Poems of John Rollin Ridge.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 43 no. 3, 2018, pp. 42-63.
  • Franks, Travis. ““We Are Considered Undesirable Foreigners” in “This Our Texas”: Mexican American Settler Nativism in Caballero.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 43 no. 3, 2018, pp. 86-102.
  • Gerrity, Sean. “Freedom on the Move: Marronage in Martin Delany’s Blake; or, the Huts of America.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 43 no. 3, 2018, pp. 1-18.
  • Pérez-Ramos, María Isabel. “Lands of Entrapment: Environmental Health and Well-Being in Literature about the US Southwest and Chicana/o Communities.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 43 no. 2, 2018, pp. 129-150. 
  • Ravela, Christian. “From the Body to Meat: Ethical Imaginations of Empowerment in Oscar Zeta Acosta’s The Revolt of the Cockroach People.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 43 no. 3, 2018, pp. 64-85.
  • Rinehart, Nicholas T. “Vernacular Soliloquy, Theatrical Gesture, and Embodied Consciousness in The Marrow of Tradition.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 43 no. 2, 2018, pp. 1-28. 
  • Smalley, Matthew. “The Unchurched Preacher and the Circulated Sermon: Literary Preaching in Toni Morrison’s Beloved.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 43 no. 2, 2018, pp. 29-52. 

Mississippi Quarterly

  • Bak, John S. “‘Love to You and Mother’: An Unpublished Letter of Tennessee Williams to His Father, Cornelius Coffin Williams, 1945.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 3, Summer 2016, pp. 347–352. 
  • Bechtold, Rebeccah. “‘Escaping from Gross Bondage’: The Divine Music of Augusta Jane Evans’s Beulah.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 2, Spring 2016, pp. 139–165.
  • Bollini, Christopher. “The Grandissimes and Political Transition: The Threat of Genealogical Violence as Harbinger of Change.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 2, Spring 2016, pp. 167–184. 
  • Chadd, Clare. “‘It Aint Arkansas or No Real Place’: Authenticity and Textuality in Barry Hannah’s Post-South.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 2, Spring 2016, pp. 227–252. 
  • Cuff, Mary. “Edna’s Sense of an Ending: A Rhetorical Analysis of Chopin’s Use of Narrative in The Awakening.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 3, Summer 2016, pp. 327–345.
  • Fowler, Doreen. “Death, Denial, and the Black Double: Reading Race in Flannery O’Connor’s Fiction.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 3, Summer 2016, pp. 303–325.
  • Harack, Katrina. “Shifting Masculinities and Evolving Feminine Power: Progressive Gender Roles in Toni Morrison’s Home.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 3, Summer 2016, pp. 371–395.
  • Marvin, Charles. “‘Counterfeit Presentment[s]’: Political Biography, Indian Removal, and Johnson Jones Hooper’s Some Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 2, Spring 2016, pp. 185–203.
  • McKee, Kathryn B. “Living in ‘Jax-Space.’” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 3, Summer 2016, pp. 399–406.
  • Murphy, Benjamin J. “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 2, Spring 2016, pp. 205–225.
  • Thomas, George. “Telling Time: Faulkner’s Temporal Turn.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 2, Spring 2016, pp. 277–299. 
  • Watkins, James H. “‘Returning to Mississippi by Choice’: Autobiographical Self-Location and the Performance of Black Masculinity in James Meredith’s Three Years in Mississippi.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 69, no. 2, Spring 2016, pp. 253–275.

Modern Fiction Studies

  • Bilbija, Marina. “Whose Global Anglophone? Race, Language, and Inter-imperiality in W. E. B. Du Bois’s Dark Princess.” MFS Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 64 no. 3, 2018, pp. 559-578. 
  • Child, Benjamin. “Astonishing Byblows: Rurality, Snopesism, and Populist Modernization in Faulkner’s Frenchman’s Bend.” MFS Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 64 no. 2, 2018, pp. 286-310.
  • Friedman, Gabriella. “Cultivating America: Colonial History in the Morrisonian Wilderness.” MFS Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 64 no. 2, 2018, pp. 311-333. 

Nineteenth-Century Literature

  • Seger, Maria. “Deferred Lynching and the Moral High Ground in Charles W. Chesnutt’s The Marrow of Tradition.” Nineteenth-Century Literature, vol 73 no. 1, 2018, pp. 94-119.

South: A Scholarly Journal

  • Alexander, Patrick Elliot. “Education as Liberation: African American Literature and Abolition Pedagogy in the Sunbelt Prison Classroom.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 50 no. 1, 2017, pp. 9-21. 
  • Freeman, Amanda. “Crossroads and Memory in William Gay’s Provinces of Night.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 2, 2017, pp. 146-165.
  • Gordon, Phillip. “Night Train across America: Mapping EthnoHeteroNationalism in the Age of Trump.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 50 no. 1, 2017, pp. 70-79. 
  • Holland, Sharon P. & Hamburger, Ben. “A Conversation with Ben Hamburger.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 50 no. 1, 2017, pp. 80-89.
  • Jones, Shermaine M.”“I Can’t Breathe!”: Affective Asphyxia in Claudia Rankine’s Citizen: An American Lyric.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 50 no. 1, 2017, pp. 37-45. 
  • Lightweis-Goff, Jennie. “Charleston is a Small Place: Literature and Tourism in a Season of Horror.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 50 no. 1, 2017, pp. 57-69.
  • Rea, Robert. “Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire: A Global Perspective.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 2, 2017, pp. 187-199.
  • Segrest, Mab. “Flagged Up, Locked, and Loaded: The Confederacy’s Call, the Trump Disaster, and the Apocalyptic Crisis of White People.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 50 no. 1, 2017, pp. 22-36. 
  • Wanat, Matt. “From Jilting to Jonquil: Katherine Anne Porter and Wendell Berry, Sustaining Connections, Re-engendering the Rural.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 49 no. 2, 2017, pp. 166-186. 
  • Warren & Christian, Jack. “The Monuments Must Go: Reflecting on Opportunities for Campus Conversations.” South: a scholarly journal, vol. 50 no. 1, 2017, pp. 47-56. 

South Atlantic Review

  • Eckard, Paula Gallant. “Queerness, Opioids, and Mountaintop Removal: The Politics of Destruction in The Evening Hour.” South Atlantic Review, vol. 83, no. 3, 2018, pp. 24-43.
  • Nemmers, Adam. “Benjy as ‘Black’: The Embodiment of Eugenic Stereotypes in The Sound and the Fury.” South Atlantic Review, vol. 83, no. 2, 2018, pp. 89-109.
  • Ortega, Gema. “The First of Many Heroines: Claudia’s Dialogic Escape in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye.” South Atlantic Review, vol. 83, no. 2, 2018, pp. 126-144.
  • Yarbrough, Scott D. “Guilty Pleasures: Faulkner, McCarthy, Pop Culture, and Reading.” South Atlantic Review, vol. 83, no. 3, 2018, pp. 1-16. 

Southern Cultures

  • Byrd, Samuel K.”Beyond Latin Night: Latinx Musicians and the Politics of Music in Charlotte.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 3, 2018, pp. 125-143.
  • Cox, Julia. ““Sing It So Loudly”: The Long History of “Birmingham Sunday”.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 3, 2018, pp. 62-75. 
  • Fraser, Max. “Down in the Hole: Outlaw Country and Outlaw Culture.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 3, 2018, pp. 83-100. 
  • Gallant, André. “Seasoned Punks: An Education in Cast Iron from the South’s Greatest Unknown Punk Trio.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 2, 2018, pp. 51-59.
  • Glover, Brian. “De-Located Yankees: David Sedaris and Growing Up Northern in the South, 1965–1983.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 2, 2018, pp. 5-20. 
  • Greaves, Brendan. “What I Learned from Gay Country, Communist Disco, and a Choctaw Poet’s Sermon on Immigration.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 3, 2018, pp. 6-29. 
  • Hall, John M. & Beam, Jeffery. “Sacred Spaces: A Look Inside the Home of Harlem Renaissance Poet Anne Spencer.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 2, 2018, pp. 21-30. 
  • McFee, Michael. “Rebecca Cushman, Mountain Gal.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 2, 2018, pp. 37-50.
  • Mcgowan, Douglas. “Jackie Shane: It’s Just, “Yes Ma’am, No Ma’am”.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 3, 2018, pp. 30-44. 
  • Motley, Clay. “”Life Gets Heavy”: Blues Tourism in Clarksdale, Mississippi.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 2, 2018, pp. 78-97.
  • Pym, William. “Soliloquy of Chaos: Ornette Coleman in Copenhagen, 1965.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 3, 2018, pp. 76-82.
  • Rosengarten, Dale. “Babylon Is Falling: The State of the Art of Sweetgrass Basketry.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 2, 2018, pp. 98-124.
  • Taylor, Christin Marie. “”Release Your Wiggle”: Big Freedia’s Queer Bounce.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 2, 2018, pp. 60-77. 
  • Thompson, Joseph M.”Nostalgic for Utopia: Anne Romaine’s Folk Music Protest in the New Left South.” Southern Cultures, vol. 24 no. 3, 2018, pp. 45-61. 

Southern Quarterly

  • Barker, Deborah E. “Southern Belle/s: Contextualizing Gone With the Wind in Two Twenty-First Century Films.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2,/3 2018, pp. 207-226.
  • Benítez-Rojo, Antonio. “The Caribbean: From a Sea Basin to an Atlantic Network.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 196-206. 
  • Clum, John M.”Kisses and Commerce: Belle Watling and Scarlett O’Hara.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 191-206.
  • Dash, J. Michael. “Relating Islands: The South of the South in the Americas.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 130-142.
  • Devanny, John. “Catholicism, Irony, and Gone With the Wind.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 98-113.
  • Dunn, Alvis E. “Six Months in Central America: The Journal of Confederate General Pierce M. B. Young, United States Minister Plenipotentiary to Guatemala and Honduras in 1895.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 40-52.
  • Flannery, Michael A.”“Death, Lice, and Men Chopped Up”: Medicine and the Making of Gone With the Wind.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 75-97.
  • Flores-Silva, Dolores & Cartwright, Keith. “Feeding the Gulf Dead: An Ofrenda of Response to Brenda Marie Osbey’s All Saints & All Souls.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 162-177. 
  • Ford, Jennifer. “Herschel Brickell and Margaret Mitchell: Archival Documentation of a Literary Friendship.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 128-137.
  • Gentile, Phillip. “A Forum on Gone With the Wind: A Convergence of Voices.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 245-254. 
  • Hoagwood, Terence. “Marketing the Illusion of Fidelity: Gone With the Wind, Novel and Film.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 138-152. 
  • Johnson, Erica. “Louisiana Identity on Trial: Pierre Dormenon’s Superior Court Case, 1790-1812.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 16-39.
  • Just, Sascha (Alexandra). “Black Indians of New Orleans—’Won’t Bow Down, Don’t Know How’.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 72-87.
  • Karem, Jeff. “‘The Deeper South?’: Richard Wright and His Conflicted Views on the Caribbean.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 112-129.
  • Knepper, Steven E. “The Nation’s Bioregion: The South in Pare Lorentz’s The River.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 88-103.
  • Lowe, John Wharton. “Guest Editor’s Introduction.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 5-14. 
  • Lowe, John Wharton. “Pirates of the Caribbean in Frank Yerby’s The Golden Hawk.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 91-111.
  • McGehee, Margaret T. & Emily Taylor. “Mr. Seabrook Goes to Haiti, or Southern (Self-) Mastery in The Magic Island (1929).” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 53-69. 
  • Mellette, Justin. “The Global South and the Jamaican Musical Tradition.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 178-195. 
  • Middleton, Billy. ““Furl that Banner, Softly, Slowly”: Confederate Flags and the Historical Gaze in Gone With the Wind.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 153-170.
  • Millichap, Joseph. “Gone With the Wind and the Brethren: Fugitive, Agrarian, and New Critical Responses to a Southern Phenomenon.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 114-127. 
  • Otero, Solimar. “In the Water with Inle: Santería’s Siren Songs in the CircumCaribbean.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 143-161.
  • Park, Stephen M. “Haunting the Plantation: The Global Southern Gothic in Eric Walrond’s Tropic Death.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 4, 2018, pp. 70-90. 
  • Platte, Nathan. “Heeding the Unheard: The Excluded Music and Musicians of Gone With the Wind.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 53-74. 
  • Simon, Julia. “Repudiation and Redemption in Go Down, Moses: Accounting, Settling, Gaming the System, and Justice.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 30-54. 
  • Smith, Matthew Paul. ““Ridiculous Extremes”: Historical Accuracy, Gone With the Wind, and the Role of Beauty in Plantation Tourism.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 171-190. 
  • Tribbett, Marcus Charles. “Three Williams and a Subversive Text: Collaboration, Communal Agency, and Resistant Identities in Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom (1860).” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 9-29. 
  • Wilson, Steve. ““I Am Scarlett”: Fan Mail and the Casting of Gone With the Wind.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 2/3, 2018, pp. 16-52. 
  • Wood, Derek R. “‘Art had almost left them’: Les Cenelles Society of Arts and Letters, the Dillard Project, and the Legacy of Afro-Creole Arts in New Orleans.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 55 no. 1, 2017, pp. 55-71.

Southern Spaces

  • Rathge, Adam R. “Mapping the Muggleheads: New Orleans and the Marijuana Menace, 1920­–1930.”Southern Spaces. 23 October, 2018

Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the Sout

  • Bickford, Leslie. “What’s in a Name? Ike’s Repudiation of the Law of the Father in Go Down, Moses.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 25, no. 1, Spring/Summer2018 2018, pp. 68–88. 
  • Parker, David B. “Georgia’s Bicentennial County Histories: The Present in the Past.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 25, no. 1, Spring/Summer2018 2018, pp. 89–102. 
  • Thornburg, Monty, and Toby Terrar. “More Than Race: The ‘Full Employment’ Civil Rights Work of Robert Brown, Alabama’s First Black Public School Superintendent.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 25, no. 1, Spring/Summer2018 2018, pp. 1–47. 

Studies in the Novel 

  • Horn, Patrick. “Faulkner’s Persistence.” Studies in the Novel 50.3 (Fall 2018): 441-444.

Texas Studies in Language and Literature

  • Hwang, Jung-Suk. “The Wild West, 9/11, and Mexicans in Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men.” Texas Studies in Literature and Language, vol. 60 no. 3, 2018, pp. 346-371.

Twentieth-Century Literature

  • Brown, Adrienne. “Hard Romping: Zora Neale Hurston, White Women, and the Right to Play.” Twentieth-Century Literature, vol. 64 no. 3, 2018, pp. 295-316. 
  • Haddox, Thomas F.”Unmaking Generations: On Gayl Jones’s Corregidora and the Pastness of the Past.” Twentieth-Century Literature, vol. 64 no. 3, 2018, pp. 275-294.

Academic Presses

Cambridge UP

  • Carpio, Glenda R. The Cambridge Companion to Richard Wright. Cambridge University Press, 2019
  • Noble, Marianne. Rethinking Sympathy and Human Contact in Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Hawthorne, Douglass, Stowe, Dickinson. Cambridge University Press, 2019.
  • Ramey, Lauri A History of African American Poetry. Cambridge University Press, 2019.

Chicago UP

  • Lee, A. Robert . Designs of Blackness  Mappings in the Literature and Culture of African Americans. Chicago UP, 2019.

Duke UP

  • Adams, Thomas Jessen and Matt Sakakeeny, editors. Remaking New Orleans:Beyond Exceptionalism and Authenticity. Duke UP, 2019.
  • Casselberry, Judith and Elizabeth A. Pritchard, editors. Spirit on the Move Black Women and Pentecostalism in Africa and the Diaspora. Duke UP, 2019.
  • Krug, Jessica A. Fugitive Modernities: Kisama and the Politics of Freedom. Duke UP, 2018.
  • Nash, Jennifer C. Black Feminism Reimagined: After Intersectionality. Duke UP, 2018.
  • Santos, Boaventura De Sousa. The End of the Cognitive Empire: The Coming of Age of Epistemologies of the South. Duke UP, 2018.
  • Weinbaum, Alys Eve. The Afterlife of Reproductive Slavery Biocapitalism and Black Feminism’s Philosophy of History. Duke UP, 2019.

Kent State University Press

  • Holcomb, Gary Edward. Teaching Hemingway and Race.Kent State University Press, 2018.

Louisiana State UP

  • Azzarello, Robert. Three Hundred Years of Decadence: New Orleans Literature and the Transatlantic World. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Boin, Arjen, Christer Brown and James A. Richardson. Managing Hurricane Katrina: Lessons from a Megacrisis. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Burnett, Katharine A. Cavaliers and Economists: Global Capitalism and the Development of Southern Literature, 1820-1860. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Cooper, William J. Approaching Civil War and Southern History. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Frawley, Michael S. Industrial Development and Manufacturing in the Antebellum Gulf South: A Reevaluation. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Gallagher, Gary W. and Stephen Cushman, editors. Civil War Writing New Perspectives on Iconic Texts. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Grimm, Josh and Jaime Loke, editors. How Public Policy Impacts Racial Inequality. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Hulbert, Matthew Christopher and John C. Inscoe, editors. Writing History with Lightning: Cinematic Representations of Nineteenth-Century America.Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Icenhauer-Ramirez, Robert. Treason on Trial: The United States v. Jefferson Davis.Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Johnson, Allison M. The Scars We Carve: Bodies and Wounds in Civil War Print Culture. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Kreiser, Lawrence A., Jr. Marketing the Blue and Gray Newspaper Advertising and the American Civil War. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • McKee, Kathryn B. Reading Reconstruction Sherwood Bonner and the Literature of the Post-Civil War South. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Rein, Christopher M. Alabamians in Blue Freedmen, Unionists, and the Civil War in the Cotton State. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Skilton, Liz. Tempest: Hurricane Naming and American Culture. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Wagner, Bryan The Life and Legend of Bras-Coupé: The Fugitive Slave Who Fought the Law, Ruled the Swamp, Danced at Congo Square, Invented Jazz, and Died for Love.Louisiana State University Press, 2019.
  • Whatley, John T., editor. An East Texas Family’s Civil War The Letters of Nancy and William Whatley, May–December 1862. Louisiana State University Press, 2019.

McFarland

  • Booth, Nathanael T. American Small-Town Fiction, 1940–1960: A Critical Study.Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2019
  • Erwin, Elizabeth and Dawn Keetley, editors. The Politics of Race, Gender and Sexuality in The Walking Dead: Essays on the Television Series and Comics. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2019

Ohio State UP

  • Jabir, Johari. Conjuring Freedom: Music and Masculinity in the Civil War’s “Gospel Army.”Ohio UP, 2018.
  • Oforlea, Aaron Ngozi. James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and the Rhetorics of Black Male Subjectivity.Ohio UP, 2018.

Oxford UP

  • Andrews, William L. Slavery and Class in the American South: A Generation of Slave Narrative Testimony, 1840-1865. Oxford University Press, 2019.
  • Blinder, Caroline. The American Photo-Text, 1930-1960. Oxford University Press, 2019.
  • Insko, Jeffrey. History, Abolition, and the Ever-Present Now in Antebellum American Writing. Oxford University Press, 2019.
  • Kennedy, J. Gerald and Scott Peeples, editors. The Oxford Handbook of Edgar Allan Poe.Oxford University Press, 2019.

Southeast Missouri State UP

  • Rieger, Christopher and Andrew B. Leiter, eds. Faulkner and Hemingway. Southeast Missouri State UP, 2018.

U of Alabama P

  • Brown, Tommy CraigDeep in the Piney Woods: Southeastern Alabama from Statehood to the Civil War, 1800–1865. The University of Alabama Press, 2018.
  • Daws, Laura Beth and Susan L. Brinson. The Greater Good: Media, Family Removal, and TVA Dam Construction in North Alabama. The University of Alabama Press, 2019.
  • Nunnally, Thomas E., editor. Speaking of Alabama: The History, Diversity, Function, and Change of Language. The University of Alabama Press, 2018.
  • Peres, Tanya M. and Aaron Deter-Wolf, editors. Baking, Bourbon, and Black Drink: Foodways Archaeology in the American Southeast.The University of Alabama Press, 2018.
  • Rutter, Emily Ruth. The Blues Muse: Race, Gender, and Musical Celebrity in American PoetryThe University of Alabama Press, 2018.

U P of Florida

  • Corrigan, Matthew T. and Michael Binder. Florida and the 2016 Election of Donald J. Trump. University Press of Florida, 2019.
  • Denham, James M. and Keith L. Huneycutt. The Letters of George Long Brown: A Yankee Merchant on Florida’s Antebellum Frontier. University Press of Florida, 2019.
  • Dunn, John M. Drying Up: The Fresh Water Crisis in Florida. University Press of Florida, 2019.
  • Link, William A. United States Reconstruction across the Americas.University Press of Florida, 2019.
  • Nelson, David J. How the New Deal Built Florida Tourism: The Civilian Conservation Corps and State Parks. University Press of Florida, 2019.
  • Young, Darius J. Robert R. Church Jr. and the African American Political Struggle. University Press of Florida, 2019.

U of Georgia P

  • Carpenter, Heath. The Philosopher King:T Bone Burnett and the Ethic of a Southern Cultural Renaissance. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Causey, Virginia E. Red Clay, White Water, and Blues: A History of Columbus, Georgia. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • ClintonCatherine, et al. Confederate Statues and Memorialization. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Clough, G. Wayne. Things New and Strange A Southerner’s Journey through the Smithsonian Collections.University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Douglas, Andrew J. W.E.B. Du Bois and the Critique of the Competitive Society. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Engel, Mary Ella. Praying with One Eye Open: Mormons and Murder in Nineteenth-Century Appalachian Georgia. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Ford, Michael North Mississippi Homeplace: Photographs and Folklife. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Foster, Thomas A. Rethinking Rufus: Sexual Violations of Enslaved Men. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Hauk, Gary S. Emory as Place:Meaning in a University Landscape. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Nash, Steven E. and Bruce E. Stewart, editors.Southern Communities:Identity, Conflict, and Memory in the American South.University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Pierrot, Grégory. The Black Avenger in Atlantic CultureUniversity of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Rose, Justin. The Drum Major Instinct Martin Luther King Jr.’s Theory of Political Service. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Terry, David Taft. The Struggle and the Urban SouthConfronting Jim Crow in Baltimore before the Movement. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Wells, Jonathan Daniel. Blind No More:African American Resistance, Free Soil Politics, and the Coming of the Civil War. University of Georgia Press, 2019.
  • Zafar, Rafia. Recipes for Respect:African American Meals and Meaning. University of Georgia Press, 2019.

U of Illinois P

  • Wood, Amy Louise and Natalie J. Ring, editors. Crime and Punishment in the Jim Crow South. University of Illinois Press, 2019.

UP of Mississippi

  • Baptiste, Bala James. Race and Radio: Pioneering Black Broadcasters in New Orleans.University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Boteler, Lovejoy. Crooked Snake The Life and Crimes of Albert Lepard. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Bronner, Simon J. The Practice of Folklore: Essays toward a Theory of Tradition. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Brosman, Catharine Savage and Olivia McNeely Pass. Louisiana Poets: A Literary Guide. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Cugny, Laurent. Analysis of Jazz: A Comprehensive Approach.University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Dajko, Nathalie and Shana Walton. Language in Louisiana: Community and Culture. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Gaudet, Marcia. Ernest J. Gaines: Conversations.University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Harper, Ryan P. The Gaithers and Southern Gospel: Homecoming in the Twenty-First Century.University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Harriel, Shelby. Behind the Rifle: Women Soldiers in Civil War Mississippi.University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Maus, Derek C., editor. Conversations with Colson Whitehead.University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Ore, Ersula J. Lynching: Violence, Rhetoric, and American Identity. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Ranney, Joseph A. A Legal History of Mississippi: Race, Class, and the Struggle for Opportunity. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Southard, Bjørn F. Stillion. Peculiar Rhetoric: Slavery, Freedom, and the African Colonization Movement. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Taylor, Christin Marie. Labor Pains: New Deal Fictions of Race, Work, and Sex in the South. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Turner, Tammy L. Dick Waterman: A Life in Blues. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Wade, Leslie A., Robin Roberts and Frank de Caro. Downtown Mardi Gras New Carnival Practices in Post-Katrina New Orleans. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Watson, Jay and James G. Thomas, Jr. Faulkner and Money.University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Weaks-Baxter, Mary.Leaving the South: Border Crossing Narratives and the Remaking of Southern Identity. 2018
  • Wilson, Clive. Time of My Life: A Jazz Journey from London to New Orleans.University Press of Mississippi, 2019.

U of Minnesota P

  • Abelson, Miriam J. Men in Place: Trans Masculinity, Race, and Sexuality in America. University of Illinois Press, 2018.
  • Story, Brett. Prison Land: Mapping Carceral Power across Neoliberal America. University of Illinois Press, 2018.
  • Yusoff, Kathryn. A Billion Black Anthropocenes or None. University of Illinois Press, 2018.

U of North Carolina P

  • Broadwater, Jeff and Troy L. Kickler, editors. North Carolina’s Revolutionary Founders. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Broadwater, Jeff. Jefferson, Madison, and the Making of the Constitution. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Broomall, James J. Private Confederacies: The Emotional Worlds of Southern Men as Citizens and Soldiers. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Chase, Robert T., editor. Caging Borders and Carceral States: Incarcerations, Immigration Detentions, and Resistance. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Christensen, Rob. The Rise and Fall of the Branchhead Boys: North Carolina’s Scott Family and the Era of Progressive Politics. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Faulkenbury, Evan. Poll Power: The Voter Education Project and the Movement for the Ballot in the American South. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Favors, Jelani M. Shelter in a Time of Storm: How Black Colleges Fostered Generations of Leadership and Activism. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Gonaver, Wendy. The Peculiar Institution and the Making of Modern Psychiatry, 1840–1880.University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Helg, Aline and Lara Vergnaud. Slave No More:Self-Liberation before Abolitionism in the Americas. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Hustwit, William P. Integration Now: Alexander V. Holmes and the End of Jim Crow Education.  University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Kotch, Seth. Lethal State: A History of the Death Penalty in North Carolina. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Lewis, Courtney. Sovereign Entrepreneurs: Cherokee Small-Business Owners and the Making of Economic Sovereignty. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Musselwhite, Paul, Peter C. Mancall, and James Horn, editors. Virginia 1619: Slavery and Freedom in the Making of English America. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Parker, Traci. Department Stores and the Black Freedom Movement:Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights from the 1930s to the 1980s.University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Reese, Ashanté M. Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington, D.C. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Reidy, Joseph P. Illusions of Emancipation: The Pursuit of Freedom and Equality in the Twilight of Slavery. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Serageldin, Samia and Lee Smith. Mothers and Strangers: Essays on Motherhood from the New South.University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Silkenat, David. Raising the White Flag: How Surrender Defined the American Civil War.University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Vidal, Cécile. Caribbean New Orleans: Empire, Race, and the Making of a Slave Society.University of North Carolina Press, 2019.

U of South Carolina P

  • Crank, James A. Understanding Randall Kenan. University of South Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Dewey, Thomas II. A View from the South: The Narrative Art of Boyd Saunders. University of South Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Gravely, William B. They Stole Him Out of Jail:Willie Earle, South Carolina’s Last Lynching Victim. University of South Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Maus, Derek C. Jesting in Earnest: Percival Everett and Menippean Satire. University of South Carolina Press, 2019.

U of Tennessee P

  • Aiello, Thomas. Dixieball: Race and Professional Basketball in the Deep South, 1947–1979.University of Tennessee Press, 2019.
  • Faulkner, Terry and Charles H. Faulkner. Rediscovering Fort Sanders: The American Civil War and Its Impact on Knoxville’s Cultural Landscape.University of Tennessee Press, 2019.
  • Lofaro, Michael A. Boone, Black Hawk, and Crockett in 1833: Unsettling the Mythic West.University of Tennessee Press, 2019.
  • Nicely, Maury. Hoffa in Tennessee: The Chattanooga Trial That Brought Down an Icon.University of Tennessee Press, 2019.
  • Peterson, Larry. Decisions of the 1862 Kentucky Campaign: The Twenty-seven Critical Decisions That Defined the Operation. University of Tennessee Press, 2019.
  • Peterson, Larry.Decisions of the Atlanta Campaign: The Twenty-one Critical Decisions That Defined the Operation.University of Tennessee Press, 2019.
  • Waselkov, Gregory A., editor. Native American Log Cabins in the Southeast.University of Tennessee Press, 2019.

U of Virginia P

  • Braun, Juliane. Creole Drama: Theatre and Society in Antebellum New Orleans.University of Virginia Press, 2019.
  • Buchanan, John. The Road to Charleston: Nathanael Greene and the American Revolution.University of Virginia Press, 2019.
  • Graber, Samuel. Twice-Divided Nation: National Memory, Transatlantic News, and American Literature in the Civil War Era. University of Virginia Press, 2019.
  • Lynn, Joshua A. Preserving the White Man’s Republic: Jacksonian Democracy, Race, and the Transformation of American Conservatism.University of Virginia Press, 2019.

About the Contributors:

Amy King is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Center for the Study of the American South & Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Associate Professor of American literature and culture at the University of Alabama, James A. Crank is a National Humanities Center Summer Fellow and the co-host of the podcast “The Sound and the Furious.” His essays have appeared in south: an interdisciplinary journal,Global South,Southern Literary JournalMississippi Quarterly, Southern Studies, and collections such as Agee Agonistes: Essays on the Life, Legend, and Works of James Agee (2007), and Southerners on Film: Essays on Hollywood Portrayals Since the 1970s (2011). His books include Understanding Sam ShepardNew Approaches to Gone with the Wind(2015), and Race and New Modernisms.

Lisa Hinrichsen is Associate Professor of English and Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Arkansas. She is the author of Possessing the Past: Trauma, Imagination, and Memory in Post-Plantation Southern Literature (LSUP, 2015) and co-editor, along with Gina Caison and Stephanie Rountree, Small-Screen Souths: Region, Identity, and the Cultural Politics of Television (LSUP, 2017).

Elizabeth Gardner is a PhD candidate at Louisiana State University. Her research interests include depictions of community in works by southern women writers. She currently serves as the ESO President

Will Murray is a PhD candidate and Blount Fellow at the University of Alabama. His work can be found in the Mississippi QuarterlyEudora Welty ReviewCEA Critic,and South Carolina Review, along with forthcoming articles in American Studies and the edited collection Reconsidering Flannery O’Connor. In his dissertation, he explores how post-1975 narratives, from and about the South, use the region to project and protect white innocence. Will is also the SSSL Newsletter’s Assistant Editor and Bibliographer.