Volume 53, Issue 2
February 2020
“Beyond” Issue

Editor’s Column

Thinking Beyond

By: Amy King

This issue of the newsletter looks ahead to and “beyond” the Society’s biennial conference in Fayetteville, Arkansas, from 2-5 April 2020. Below, you will find our President’s column, which describes some features of the upcoming conference, such as listening sessions, a meeting of the new Caucus on Race and Inclusivity, a conversation on organizing in academia, and a “Queering the Record” Wikistorm event. Stay tuned for the finalized conference program—in the meantime, be sure to register for the conference and, if possible, donate to assist graduate students attending the conference.

At the same time, this newsletter reminds us that thinking—and acting—beyond the status quo necessitates self-reflexivity regarding entrenched and persistent racism in southern studies. Following the President’s column, readers will find a summary and reflection on the roundtable conversation “Elephants in the Room: Addressing Race and Racism in Medieval Studies and Studies of the U.S. South.” Convened at the SAMLA conference in November 2019, the dialogue between established and emerging scholars in southern and medieval studies modeled a way to facilitate difficult and necessary conversations about structures of white supremacy in our sub-fields. Among their takeaways, the organizers wish to highlight how Professor Eve Tuck’s guidelines to foster a thoughtful Q&A session, widely available via Twitter, led to a productive session focused on collaborative problem-solving. The organizers invite SSSL members to reach out to them to join the conversation, to look back as we move forward.

President’s Column

By: Lisa Hinrichsen

I’ve been thinking about the “beyond” in our conference theme of “Beyond Borders, Bars, and Binaries: Rethinking ‘South’ in an Age of Crisis,” and the concrete ways we can move there as an organization. As your President for the past two years, I’ve worked in conjunction with the Executive Council, the Emerging Scholars Organization, and various subcommittees to emphasize the ways that SSSL is firmly committed to social equality. We have updated our webpage, established guidelines for moderating our social media presence, reformulated our constitution and by-laws, and developed new policies on harassment, bullying, and advocacy. These policies are not just words, but commitments to rethinking practices of domination, intimidation, and pressure that, if not enacted, limit the spirit of collective work, diverse thought, and intellectual generosity of which we are all capable.

We have consciously translated this work into the design of our conference program. In addition to piloting pre-conference seminars on a variety of topics related to accessibility, inclusion, diversity, and justice, we are hosting for the first time an open membership meeting the first evening of the conference, 2 April. Gina Caison, who will become President immediately after the conference, and I will be there to listen to your questions about the organization and to hear what initiatives you’d like to have us pursue. We will also be talking about specific ways you can become involved in the organization: open positions on our Executive Council, and our new Caucus on Race and Inclusivity. This Caucus will host its initial meeting Friday evening, and all are welcome. Gina will be offering additional “listening sessions” throughout the conference, and she will be sending the specifics of these meetings soon. If you are an emerging scholar—broadly defined as a graduate student, a recent PhD, an adjunct/visiting/assistant professor, or a scholar new to the field of southern studies—I urge you to join the Emerging Scholars Organization on Friday morning for coffee and pastries. Finally, all members are welcome to our inaugural newcomer’s dinner on Friday evening.

We will be releasing the final program soon and you’ll see a few additional events on the program roster that I want to highlight here. First, in conjunction with the ESO, we are hosting Leah Champagne, from AFT Academics, to chair a discussion on organizing and self-advocacy in academic spaces. The ESO will also be hosting a WikiStorm on Friday morning. Please set up your Wikipedia account before traveling to Fayetteville so that you can join in “Queering the Record.” We have added two more events of note: a goodbye event to south, hosted by Sharon Holland and Katherine Henninger, editor of the final issue on quare childhood. And finally, Kathy McGregor, Director of the Prison Story Project, has made available for screening the just-finished film On the Row: Stories of Arkansas’s Death Row. She will be joined by Jane Blunschi, Creative Director, to talk more about their work in prison advocacy, storytelling as social justice, and filmmaking.

I look forward to welcoming you to Fayetteville soon. Please reach out before then if I can be of assistance.

Elephants in the Room: Looking Back, Moving Forward

By: Joshua Jackson, Gayle Fallon, Shari Arnold, and Kelly Vines

At SAMLA 91, established and emerging scholars in the fields of southern and medieval studies convened for the roundtable discussion “Elephants in the Room: Addressing Race and Racism in Medieval Studies and Studies of the U.S. South.” The roundtable consisted of presentations and discussion questions from the following scholars: 

  • Holly Hamby, Fisk University 
  • Lindsay Gill, Tougaloo College
  • Barbara Goodman, Clayton State University
  • Shari Arnold, Georgia State University
  • Gayle Fallon, Louisiana State University
  • Joshua Jackson, Georgia State University
  • Kelly Vines, Louisiana State University

We wanted to take a moment to reflect on some of the challenges and successes of this project in the hopes that others might use what we have learned, and are continuing to learn, in order to convene similar panels at upcoming conferences. Though cross-specialty projects like this one can often be difficult to organize, they are nevertheless important in bringing to the fore conversations happening across a variety of sub-fields and encouraging collaboration as we tackle these difficult issues. We deliberately chose to convene this panel at SAMLA because the conference often brings together a variety of scholars across English Literary Studies, which meant that none of the panelists would be attending the conference solely for this panel.

Though we did not receive submissions from scholars working in southern studies, we were gratified by the professors in medieval studies who responded to the CFP and shared their work with us. Professors Hamby, Gill, and Goodman shared a variety of pedagogical and research strategies for teaching medieval literature and culture while also engaging in scholar activism. The professors presented practical recommendations for addressing race and racism in medieval studies, which included supporting scholar activism on Twitter, being more selective about the language chosen to guide class discussion, and bringing critical race approaches to medieval literature (e.g., Toni Morrison’s “Grendel and His Mother”) into the classroom.

Initially, we (Shari, Gayle, Josh, and Kelly) only intended to serve as moderators for the conversation, but when we did not receive any submissions from scholars in southern studies, we decided to prepare our own brief remarks in order to foster the cross-specialty conversation promised by the panel’s title. We organized our own presentations around questions we were grappling with as scholars emerging in the field of medieval studies (Gayle) and southern studies (Shari, Josh, and Kelly). In brief, Shari asked the audience to reflect on whom we (junior/senior scholars; graduate students; educators at large) serve and why we teach difficult subjects such as race in southern and medieval studies; Gayle asked the audience to reflect on how medieval studies perpetuates English nationalist discourses of race from the nineteenth century; Josh asked the audience to reflect on how close reading continues to privilege linguistic and textual hierarchies in southern and medieval studies; and Kelly asked the audience to reflect on institutional barriers to interdisciplinary and anti-racist work. Taken together, these brief presentations outlined the questions that would guide the larger group discussion.  

In both presentations and the Q&A, roundtable organizers and participants openly acknowledged that the majority of panelists were white. This lack of diversity prompted several respondent reflections on the importance of practicing inclusive strategies for dialogue and doing the work of restructuring the academy with scholars of color. Many noted that academic organizations need to be more conscious of the ways in which scholars of color are already overburdened by the expectation that they should be the ones to initiate and facilitate such conversations.

The roundtable was exceptionally well-attended with nearly 30 scholars from medieval and southern studies as well as other fields in the audience. We would like to thank panelists and audience members alike for their willingness to engage in these difficult conversations with us. To provide a bit of structure for our Q&A, we followed the guidelines Eve Tuck, Associate Professor of Critical Race and Indigenous Studies at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, created for moderating panels. We began the Q&A by asking audience members to talk amongst themselves for approximately 5-7 minutes. This gave everyone a chance to discuss their immediate impressions with their neighbors and think together about questions and comments they would like to address to the entire room. Because audience members crafted responses as a group, the Q&A became less of a series of one-on-one queries and more of a collaborative problem-solving session. As we intended, the Q&A enacted, in miniature, a model for addressing collegiate concerns on a larger scale. Panelists and audience members responded overwhelmingly positively to this format. As moderators, we believe it contributed to the invigorating and meaningful discussion between panelists and attendees, and we strongly recommend this moderation strategy for future panels. 

After the conference concluded, Kathryn Wymer, Associate Professor of English at North Carolina Central University, contacted us about a panel she recently presented on at the Southeastern Medieval Studies Association (SEMA) in Greensboro, North Carolina. She mentioned the possibility of putting together a larger symposium that could perhaps be a joint venture between southern studies and medieval studies scholars. We look forward to participating in these ongoing conversations, and we welcome SSSL’s membership to join us as we continue to think through these questions. 

Emerging Scholars Organization Update

CFP for ESO Blog: Emerging Souths

As part of the Emerging Scholars Organization’s ongoing mission to support and amplify the voices of early-career scholars, we are introducing a new digital initiative. The blog Emerging Souths will serve as a platform for emerging scholars to share ongoing research, thoughts on pedagogy, service experiences, and “undisciplined” writing—that is, genres and forms beyond the academic. The field of southern studies is a better place when it reflects a wide range of voices and perspectives. Our hope is that this blog will be a space where a diverse group of emerging scholars feel welcomed to share their thoughts and ideas—as well as a space where we can all grow and learn through each other’s perspectives.

We plan for Emerging Souths to be a platform that highlights and broadcasts the exciting work being done in the field. We encourage contributors to experiment with ideas, questions, methodologies, and modes of writing that exceed the purview of “academic writing” and evince alternative ways of thinking and knowing. In other words, this platform invites emerging scholars to share how they (as writers, teachers, and community members) are engaging and reshaping the field of southern cultural studies (broadly defined). We also hope that Emerging Souths will serve as a platform for early-career scholars to gain experience writing for broader publics, and to think in new ways about how we share our work in academic and non-academic venues.

Ultimately, this initiative strives to be an ongoing record of the often-unseen projects, innovations, practices, and methodologies that emerging scholars undertake. While there is still much work to be done, all of us are excited about sharing the field’s emergent transformation with a wider audience. We hope this blog works toward that goal.

While we welcome a wide range of styles and approaches to Emerging Souths, we are particularly committed to sharing work that is accessible to publics beyond academia. With this in mind, we welcome submissions in the following forms as well as others not listed:

  • Interviews (with scholars, community activists, fellow emerging scholars, etc.)
  • Pedagogical reflections (e.g. “How I teach…”; inclusive citation practices, etc.)
  • Short-form introductions to one’s research
  • Keywords for the study of southern literature and culture: e.g. “climate change”; “borders”; “migration”; “digital humanities” etc.
  • Reviews of fiction, film, music, art exhibits, and other media
  • Activist projects
  • Reflections on the academic precariat
  • Personal essays
  • Hybrid genres, such as experimental nonfiction, memoir-scholarship, auto-theory, etc.
  • Short-form essays about current events, policies, and debates

If you are interested in sharing your work, please email your submission and a brief introduction to our editorial staff at emergingsouths@gmail.com. Please attach any media (photos, videos, music) you would like to include in your publication along with your submission. In the subject line of your email, please identify which of the following categories best describes your work (we cannot guarantee that emails without the category in the subject line will find their way to the appropriate editorial team):

Pedagogy:

  • “Pedagogy” welcomes submissions (2,500 words or less) that reflect on the ways in which we integrate southern studies in our classrooms. Instructors at any stage of their careers who teach introductory and/or upper-level composition & rhetoric, literature, creative writing, and interdisciplinary courses are invited to contribute equally to the conversation. In addition to the use of texts, we are interested in how specific assignments, and your students’ engagements with these assignments, draw upon southern studies as a framework.

Research:

  • The “Research” section welcomes submissions of short-form essays (4000 words or less) that investigate a range of voices, approaches, and texts about the cultures, localities, and peoples that make up the world’s many souths, whether local, regional, or global. These posts are not meant to be article-length; however, authors might consider using our platform to draft and promote research that will be developed into full, article-length essays for peer review. We are also interested in publishing experimental short-form research essays that may not “fit” into more traditional publications. To promote early-career researchers and the labor they do for conferences and graduate seminars, we are interested in revised conference presentations or seminar papers that make use of digital media.

Service:

  • Posts in the “Service” section will reflect the many ways scholars are impacting the world around them (in ways beyond college/university teaching and academic publishing). Submissions may explore new and emerging service projects & initiatives throughout the communities and spaces often explored academically by southern cultural studies. We look forward to learning more about how scholars are using their positions to positively impact their communities, and we hope the posts found here will also inspire others to find new ways to invest in their communities. This section invites submissions that help reshape and promote service work as materially engaged with communities outside of and adjacent to universities, and promotes recognition that service is work that “counts.”

Undisciplined:

  • The “Undisciplined” section invites submissions that explore genres and formats outside the typical conventions of the academy, and which may not fit the rubric of other sections. We welcome shorter pieces that perhaps pose more questions than answers and offer experimental or creative responses to the broad topic of the South. Examples may include (but are certainly not limited to) poetry, film reviews, travel writing, creative nonfiction, interviews, mixed media presentations, manifestos, and beyond. This section is meant to be experimental and boundary-crossing, a place to not only play with writing and ideas, but to expand notions of what counts as valuable knowledge-work. As the title of this section suggests, we invite writers to try new forms of writing, seeing, and thinking that wander beyond the bounds of academe.

Upon submission, your work will be reviewed by our editorial team. If it is selected to be published on Emerging Souths, you will be notified and given the opportunity to revise before publication. Although we are not a peer-reviewed publication, all submissions are subject to the review of the editorial board. For the sake of consistency and accessibility, we request that contributors follow the citation guidelines outlined in the 8th edition of the MLA Handbook. We accept submissions on a rolling basis. Our first posts will be published in March. If you have any questions, please reach out to any member of the Executive Council or email emergingsouths@gmail.com

Emerging Souths is an independent publication. Although we are affiliated with the Emerging Scholars Organization and the Society for the Study of Southern Literature, the articles published here represent the viewpoints of each individual author, not the collective editorial voice of Emerging Souths, the Emerging Scholars Organization, or the Society for the Study of Southern Literature.

Announcements

Awards

John Wharton Lowe’s  Calypso Magnolia: The Crosscurrents of Caribbean and Southern Literature (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2016) won the Sharon L. Dean Award from the Constance Fenimore Woolson Society

Congratulations to Dr. Jo Davis-McElligatt for being elected to the Executive Committee for the MLA Forum LLC Southern United States.

CFPs

“Southern Modernist Women Writers And The Streets” CFP Modernist Studies Association Conference; Brooklyn, NY; October 22-25, 2020

In  keeping with the Modernist Studies Association 2020 conference theme of  the “streets,” the Carson McCullers Society is pleased to sponsor a  roundtable discussion series about southern modernist women writers and the  streets. The roundtable panel is intended to spark conversation among  Eudora Welty, Flannery O’Connor, Carson McCullers, Margaret Walker,  Katherine Anne Porter, Kate Chopin, Anne Spencer, Zora Neale Hurston, and Lillian Hellman scholars, among others, about the  innovations and interventions of southern modernist women writers in  creating street scenes and characters. Please send all queries and/or a  300-word abstract and short bio to the Carson McCullers Society at carsonmccullerssociety@gmail.com by Sunday, March 1st. Please write “MSA 2020 abstract” as the subject of your email.

MLA, Jan. 7-10, 2021, Toronto, Theme: Persistence
Quare Souths Roundtable

Forum: Southern United States

As E. Patrick Johnson suggested in his article from 2001 entitled “‘Quare’ Studies, or (Almost) Everything I Know About Queer Studies I Learned from My Grandmother,” “‘quare’…not only speaks across identities, it articulates identities as well. ‘Quare’ offers a way to critique stable notions of identity and, at the same time, to locate racialized and class knowledges.” Twenty years later, we ask whether southern studies has yet to be fully “quare”-ed. For this roundtable, we seek papers and innovative presentations that investigate–across genres and time periods–critical intersections of racial and sexual politics in southern texts, broadly defined, as connected to the presidential themes of MLA 2021—namely, “persistence…endurance, survival, defiance, resistance, creating, and flourishing.” Issues addressed might include: the ways in which texts show individuals and collectives surviving and enduring in the face of oppressive and restrictive expectations related to race and sexuality; the ways in which intersecting racial and sexual identities can provide liberation and sources of pride and political agency for individuals and collectives; how sites within and beyond the U.S. South function within texts as sources of oppression and/or power for queer/ quare, non-white individuals. Papers that move beyond expected racial and sexual binaries and that point scholars in new directions within southern literary studies will be given particular attention. Please send a 250-word abstract and CV to Molly McGehee at mmcgehe@emory.edu by 15 March 2020.

CFP: Inhospitable Souths
2021 MLA Toronto, January 7-10 2021

In The Southern Hospitality Myth: Ethics, Politics, Race, and American Memory (2017), Anthony Szczesiul suggests that “rather than promoting an ethics of universal welcome, the discourse of southern hospitality has expressed a retrograde politics of exclusion.” The rise in white nationalism, the degradation of ecological resources, and voter suppression legislation further call into question the idea of an inclusive and receptive United States South. This panel seeks 15-minute papers that explore the issues of restriction, removal, and abjection in southern literature and culture. How do formal and informal processes disavow certain peoples, cultures, and beliefs? In what ways does the growing impact and presence of the Global South generate new anxieties in southern culture and southern studies as a field? How do we contend with the possibility of an uninhabitable south? We are especially interested in papers that engage with multiethnic perspectives and cross-regional analysis that offer new approaches to southern literature, culture, and scholarship. Please send a 250-word abstract and a copy of your CV to Frank Cha, Virginia Commonwealth University (fscha@vcu.edu) by March 15, 2020. All panel participants must be MLA members by April 7, 2020.

CFP: Citizen Acts
MLA Toronto | January 7-10 2021

The 14th Amendment stipulates that “all persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” Yet the conference of the rights of U.S. citizenship to Indigenous peoples, descendants of enslaved Africans, nonwhite immigrants, and refugees has been repeatedly contested and warped by and in federal and state law. The full expression of national citizenship by nonwhite peoples in the U.S. South has been mutually shaped and conscripted by the experience and legacies of Jim Crow, indigenous removal, and anti-immigrant and refugee policies. For example, Wong Kim Ark’s successful petition for birthright citizenship in 1898 was predicated on the 14th Amendment making citizens of the enslaved African. 1924 saw the passage of Johnson-Reed Act, which severely limited the number of nonwhite immigrants to the United States, as well as the Indian Citizenship Act, which made citizens of all Indigenous people. Though the 1848 Treaty of Guadaloupe Hidalgo required Mexican nationals to become U.S. citizens or leave, in keeping with then-current U.S. immigration restriction policies in 1929 the U.S. forcibly repatriated hundreds of thousands of Mexican Americans, the majority of whom were birthright citizens. The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, which did away with the quota system, was passed in tandem with the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. In our present moment, the Trump administration’s fomentation of Birtherism is manifesting in the detention of nonwhite refugees and immigrants along the southern border. We seek 15-minute papers that investigate constructions of the citizen in southern literature and culture along ethnic, sexual, racial, and regional lines. How have these citizenship acts—and others not mentioned here—been interrogated, deconstructed, resisted, or explored by writers, artists, and culture workers in the south? How has the experience of navigating and agitating for citizenship been mutually constitutive for Indigenous peoples, the descendants of the enslaved, and immigrants? We will give special consideration to abstracts that engage in cross-ethnic analysis, critical border studies, and/or that show how these citizen acts respond to the 2021 MLA convention theme of persistence. Please send a 250-word abstract and CV to Joanna Davis-McElligatt at joanna.davis-mcelligatt@unt.edu by March 15th 2020.

CFP: Indigenous Other Worlds: Frights, Fantasies, Futurities

MLA Toronto
7-10 January, 2021

How do Indigenous writers (in any time period) envision Indigenous other worlds? What do these worlds help make visible about Indigenous histories, temporalities, resistances, fears, fantasies, survivance, persistence? 300-word abstracts to eandersd@gmu.edu by March 22.

The 3rd Faulkner Studies in the UK Colloquium: Faulkner, the Twenties, and Modernism

Call for Papers
Royal Holloway, University of London
11 Bedford Square, Room 1-01, May 28th, 2020

The 1920s were defined by the innovation of European modernists such as James Joyce (Ulysses), T. S. Eliot (The Waste Land), Virginia Woolf (Mrs Dalloway), and D. H. Lawrence (Lady Chatterly’s Lover). In that same decade, American modernism converged rapidly with its European counterpart, thanks largely to the expatriate movement in Paris, where American writers such as Ezra Pound (Hugh Selwyn Mauberly), F. Scott Fitzgerald (The Great Gatsby), and Ernest Hemingway (The Sun Also Rises) each published ground-breaking examples of modernist literature. 

The literary career of William Faulkner emerged from this modernist fervour that was preoccupied with experimentation. Faulkner’s own innovative narrative techniques are reflected in the form and content of his best known novel of the period, The Sound and the Fury (1929). The novel’s four distinct sections interpolate various different voices and perspectives, to become what Roland Barthes terms as ‘a tissue of quotations drawn from the innumerable centers of culture.’ In his literary output of the decade, Faulkner confronted issues of fragmentation, dislocation, mortality, morality, race, and sexuality.

This colloquium, the third in the history of the Faulkner Studies in the UK Research Network, invites proposals for twenty-minute papers on any topic related to Faulkner’s writing in the 1920s and his relationship to modernism. Topics include but are not limited to: 

  • New critical approaches to New Orleans SketchesSoldiers’ Pay, Mosquitoes, Sartoris, and/or The Sound and the Fury
  • The early formation of Yoknapatawpha County 
  • Faulkner’s relation to European and American modernism (Joyce, Pound, Eliot, Woolf, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Stein, etc)
  • Faulkner’s experiences in Paris (as documented in Thinking of Home
  • Faulkner’s literary influences of the time (Shakespeare, Keats, Melville, Conrad, etc) 
  • Faulkner as poet, essayist, short story writer, and/or artist
  • Faulkner’s experiments with medieval and early modern literature and culture
  • Faulkner’s foray into pulp fiction
  • Faulkner’s literary relationships with Sherwood Anderson, Phil Stone, Ben Wasson, and others

The Network is particularly interested in papers from scholars which reflect the diversity of Faulkner Studies in terms of gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and institutional affiliation. We aim to include a mix of participants from across the career spectrum (from postgraduate students to full professors). All are welcome to apply. 

Abstract proposals of c. 300 words, along with a short biographical sketch, should be sent to the organiser, Dr Ahmed Honeini, at ahmed.honeini.2015@live.rhul.ac.uk by Sunday April 4th, 2020. Presenters will be notified of acceptance of their papers by Sunday April 11th, 2020. 

Follow us on Twitter (@FaulknerStUKRN) and consult our website for further information.

Bibliography

If you would like to add your recent work to the next bibliography or have suggestions about journals/presses we should add, please email Will Murray at William_P_Murray@baylor.edu.

Scholarly Journals

African American Review

  • Bernard, Patrick S. “A ‘Cipher Language’: Thomas W. Talley and Call-and-Response during the Harlem Renaissance.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 2, Summer 2019, pp. 121–142.
  • Bone, Martyn. “Transnational and Intertextual Geographies of Race, Sex, and Masculinity: Cecil Brown’s The Life and Loves of Mr. Jiveass Nigger.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 4, Winter 2019, pp. 357–372.
  • Edwards, Suzanne M., and Trudier Harris. “Gloria Naylor’s ‘Sapphira Wade’: An Unfinished Manuscript from the Archive.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 4, Winter 2019, pp. 323–340.
  • Gradert, Kenyon. “Lorenzo Dow Blackson’s The Rise and Progress of the Kingdoms of Light and Darkness.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 3, Fall 2019, pp. 217–238.
  • Kennon, Raquel. “Subtle Resistance: On Sugar and the Mammy Figure in Kara Walker’s A Subtlety and Sherley Anne Williams’s Dessa Rose.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 2, Summer 2019, pp. 143–164.
  • Lewis, Amy. “Who’ll Speak for Malinda?: Alternate Narratives of Freedom in The Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 3, Fall 2019, pp. 255–276.
  • Lewis, Christopher S. “Neuter-Bound/Neuter-Freed: Queer Gender and Resistance to Slavery.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 4, Winter 2019, pp. 341–355.
  • Manditch-Prottas, Zachary. “Meeting at the Watchtower: Eldridge Cleaver, James Baldwin’s No Name in the Street, and Racializing Homophobic Vernacular.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 2, Summer 2019, pp. 179–195.
  • Sharp, Ryan. “In the Shadow of the Archive: The Big Smoke and Black American Persona Poetry.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 4, Winter 2019, pp. 373–387. 
  • Sillin, Sarah. “Seduction’s Offspring: Resisting Sentimental Violence from Wilson to Wells.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 3, Fall 2019, pp. 277–292. 
  • Tewkesbury, Paul. “A Time to Break Literary Silence: Lessons from the Civil Rights Movement and Vietnam in Anthony Grooms’s Bombingham.” African American Review, vol. 52, no. 2, Summer 2019, pp. 165–178.

American Indian Quarterly

  • Lopenzina, Drew, and Travis Franks. “Who Lies Buried in Satanta’s Tomb? Co-Memorating a Kiowa Warrior.” American Indian Quarterly, vol. 43, no. 3, Summer 2019, pp. 249–280. 
  • Swensen, James R. “Bound for the Fair: Chief Joseph, Quanah Parker, and Geronimo and the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair.” American Indian Quarterly, vol. 43, no. 4, Fall 2019, pp. 439–470.

American Literary History

  • Adams, Katherine. “Du Bois, Dirt Determinism, and the Reconstruction of Global Value.” American Literary History, vol. 31 no. 4, 2019, p. 715-740.
  • Hewitt, Elizabeth. “Romanticism of Numbers: Hamilton, Jefferson, and the Sublime.” American Literary History, vol. 31 no. 4, 2019, p. 619-638. 
  • Mclnnis, Jarvis C. “Black Women’s Geographies and the Afterlives of the Sugar Plantation.” American Literary History, vol. 31 no. 4, 2019, p. 741-774. 
  • Morrison, Spencer. “Cormac McCarthy, Marilynne Robinson, and the Responsibility to Protect.” American Literary History, vol. 31 no. 3, 2019, p. 458-481. 
  • Pollack, Harriet. Review of Monica Carol Miller, Being Ugly: Southern Women Writers and Social Rebellion in American Literary History Online Review, Series XVIII, March 2019.

American Literature

  • Allewaert, Monique. “Super Fly: François Makandal’s Colonial Semiotics.” American Literature, 1 September 2019; 91 (3): 459–490. 
  • Bergner, Gwen. “Introduction: The Plantation, the Postplantation, and the Afterlives of Slavery.” American Literature, 1 September 2019; 91 (3): 447–457.
  • Child, Benjamin. “The Plantation Countermelodies of Dunbar and Du Bois: Writing Agropolitical Subjecthood in the Nadir.” American Literature, 1 September 2019; 91 (3): 557–586.
  • DeLombard, Jeannine Marie. “Dehumanizing Slave Personhood.” American Literature, 1 September 2019; 91 (3): 491–521.
  • Fleming, Julius B. “Transforming Geographies of Black Time: How the Free Southern Theater Used the Plantation for Civil Rights Activism.” American Literature, 1 September 2019; 91 (3): 587–617.
  • Goldberg, Shari. “A New Chapter in the Story of Trauma: Narratives of Bodily Healing from 1860s America.” American Literature, 1 December 2019; 91 (4): 721–749.
  • Laski, Gregory. “Reconstructing Revenge: Race and Justice after the Civil War.” American Literature, 1 December 2019; 91 (4): 751–781.
  • McInnis, Jarvis C. “A Corporate Plantation Reading Public: Labor, Literacy, and Diaspora in the Global Black South.” American Literature, 1 September 2019; 91 (3): 523–555.
  • Wolfson, Roberta; “Race Leaders, Race Traitors, and the Necropolitics of Black Exceptionalism in Paul Beatty’s Fiction.” American Literature, 1 September 2019; 91 (3): 619–647.

American Studies

  • Juárez, Miguel. “From Buffalo Soldiers to Redlined Communities: African American Community Building in El Paso’s Lincoln Park Neighborhood.” American Studies, vol. 58, no. 3, Oct. 2019, pp. 107–124. 
  • Rogers-Cooper, Justin. “Freedom and Extermination: Violence, Culture, and Politics in the Era of Haitian and U.S. Emancipation.” American Studies, vol. 58, no. 2, July 2019, pp. 55–66. 
  • Stone, Brad. “Studying Black Men Seriously: A Reading of Tommy Curry’s The Man-Not.” American Studies, vol. 58, no. 2, July 2019, pp. 67–77.

Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present Journal (ASAP/J)

  • Aikens, Natalie, Amy Clukey, Amy K. King, and Isadora J. Wagner, “South to The Plantationocene.” Feature in ASAP/J, 17 October 2019

Callaloo

  • Anim-Addo, Joan and Maria Helena Lima. “The Power of the Neo-Slave Narrative Genre.” Callaloo, vol. 41 no. 1, 2018, p. 1-8. 
  • Campa, Marta Fernández. “Counter-Memory and the Archival turn in Dorothea Smartt’s Ship Shape.” Callaloo, vol. 40 no. 4, 2017, p. 94-112.
  • Childs, Dennis. “”An Insinuating Voice”: Angelo Herndon and the Invisible Genesis of the Radical Prison Slave’s Neo-Slave Narrative.” Callaloo, vol. 40 no. 4, 2017, p. 30-56. 
  • Goldberg, Jesse A. “The Restored Literary Behaviors of Neo-Slave Narratives: Troubling the Ethics of Witnessing in the Excessive Present.” Callaloo, vol. 40 no. 4, 2017, p. 57-77. 
  • Iasiello, Stephanie. “Photographing A Subtlety or the Marvelous Sugar Baby: Kara Walker’s Take on the Neo-Slave Narrative.” Callaloo, vol. 40 no. 4, 2017, p. 14-29.
  • Kamali, Leila. “The Voice, The Body, and ‘Letting it all Fly’: Neo-Slave Narratives and the Discursive Framing of Urban America.” Callaloo, vol. 40 no. 4, 2017, p. 137-154. 
  • Maddox, John. “The Black Atlantic Revisited: Ana Maria Gonçalves’s Um defeito de cor.” Callaloo, vol. 40 no. 4, 2017, p. 155-173. 
  • McCoy, Beth A. “Flights of Principled Fancy Dress: Steve Prince’s Katrina Suite and the Neo-Slave Narrative.” Callaloo, vol. 40 no. 4, 2017, p. 183-200.
  • Pérez-Fernández, Irene. “Breaking Historical Silence: Emotional Wealth in Joan Anim-Addo’s ‘Daughter and His Housekeeper’ and Andrea Levy’ The Long Song.” Callaloo, vol. 40 no. 4, 2017, p. 113-126.
  • Puertas, Lucia Llano. “Touching the Past: The Inscription of Trauma and Affect in Francophone Neo-Slave Narratives.” Callaloo, vol. 40 no. 4, 2017, p. 78-93. 

Cormac McCarthy Journal

  • Elmore, Jonathan and Rick Elmore. “”He wondered why a road should come to such a place”: Community and Posthumanism in Cormac McCarthy’s Outer Dark.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 17 no. 2, 2019, p. 116-133.
  • Elmore, Jonathan and Rick Elmore. “‘You reckon there are just some places the good lord didn’t intend folks to live in?’: The Absence of Community in McCarthy’s Child of God.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 17 no. 2, 2019, p. 134-147.
  • Guerra, Elijah. “‘Nothingness is not a curse’: Suttree‘s Absurd Revolt.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 17 no. 2, 2019, p. 148-170.
  • Luce, Dianne C. “Ballard Rising in Outer Dark: The Genesis and Early Composition of Child of God.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 17 no. 2, 2019, p. 87-115. 
  • Monk, Nicholas. “Desert Gothic: Cormac McCarthy, Paul Bowles, and Don Waters.” The Cormac McCarthy Journal, vol. 17 no. 2, 2019, p. 171-186.

Early American Literature

  • Boyden, Michael. “Salt and Slavery in Crèvecœur.” Early American Literature, vol. 54 no. 3, 2019, p. 711-740. 
  • Trigg, Christopher. “The Racial Politics of Resurrection in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World.” Early American Literature, vol. 55 no. 1, 2020, p. 47-84. 

Edgar Allan Poe Review

  • Corcella, Aldo. “A New Poe Source: Thomas Thomson’s ‘Sketch of the Progress of Physical Science’.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 173-199.
  • Costanza, Jordan. “Of Ravens and Romanticism: Edgar Allan Poe’s Enduring Legacy in American Education and the Juvenile Adaptations of His Poetry and Prose.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 249-268.
  • Ehrlich, Heyward. “Poe in Cyberspace: How Much of the Internet Is Fake?” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 324-328. 
  • Gowen, Emily. “A Global Sickness: Medical Science and Print Culture in The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 269-288.
  • Keener, Kelly. “Missing Letter Found: An Epistle Written by Frances Sargent Osgood to Elizabeth Ellet in Connection with the Poe-Osgood Scandal.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 200-209.
  • Kopley, Richard. “‘The Raven’ and Melville’s Pierre.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 210-218.
  • Lewis, Paul. “‘The mystery which binds me still’: Poe’s Traumatic, Complex, and Fertile Bereavement.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 219-238.
  • Miquel-Baldellou, Marta. “Retracing Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales in Stephen King’s Short Fiction: Nightmares and Dreamscapes as a Case of Transtextuality.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 289-304.
  • Savoye, Jeffrey A. “Poe’s 1843 Text of ‘The Business Man’.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 305-307. 
  • Semtner, Christopher P. “Poe in Richmond: Poe’s Appeal to Edward Valentine.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 329-336.
  • Shan, Xueqi. “‘Thou Art the Man’ as a Clue to ‘The Mystery of Marie Rogêt’.” The Edgar Allan Poe Review, vol. 20 no. 2, 2019, p. 239-248. 

Eudora Welty Review

  • Berger, Dianne1. “Eudora Welty’s Family Elegies: One Writer’s Beginnings and The Optimist’s Daughter.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 11, Spring 2019, pp. 77–81. 
  • Bezbradica, Viktorija. “Eudora Welty’s Cyclical Temporality: Intersections among Memoir, Nonfiction, and Fiction.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 11, Spring 2019, pp. 83–90. 
  • Crews, Elizabeth. “‘The Still-Existing Parts of Life,’ Part I: The Early Correspondence of Eudora Welty and Mary Louise Aswell.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 11, Spring 2019, pp. 33–46.
  • Fennell, Jill1. “An Economics of Apathy: Anxieties of Capital and Care in Delta Wedding.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 11, Spring 2019, pp. 47–69.
  • Gleason, Michael. “Circe and Language: What Welty Took from Joyce.” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 11, Spring 2019, pp. 71–75. 
  • Jordan, James A. “‘My Greatest Pleasure in Writing’: Dialogue in Eudora Welty’s ‘Death of a Traveling Salesman.’” Eudora Welty Review, vol. 11, Spring 2019, pp. 91–96.

European Journal of American Culture

  • Pollack, Harriet. Cluster review article titled “Emmett Till in Different Genres.” European Journal of American Culture, 37.1 March 2018, pp. 85-90.

Flannery O’Connor Review

  • Edmondson, Henry T. III. “How Flannery O’Connor Read Franz Kafka: Considerations of Style and Grace,” Flannery O’Connor Review, Volume 17 (August 2019)
  • Ference, Damian. “Springsteen’s Catechist: Flannery O’Connor’s Influence on Bruce Springsteen.” Flannery O’Connor Review, Volume 17 (August 2019)
  • Fowler, Doreen. “Racial Scapegoating and White Redemption: Reconsidering Race in Flannery O’Connor.” Flannery O’Connor Review, Volume 17 (August 2019)
  • King, Josephine Keese. “Circa: O’Connor’s Early Years.” Flannery O’Connor Review, Volume 17 (August 2019)
  • Miller, Monica Carol. “Only Southernness: Flannery O’Connor and R.E.M.”
  • Streight, Irwin H. “Nick Cave, Flannery O’Connor, and the Embodied Sacred.” Flannery O’Connor Review, Volume 17 (August 2019)
  • Wilson, Lucas F. W. “Of Gossip and Gaze: The Shift from Symbolic to Social Exclusion ‘Seen’ through a Post-Holocaust Aesthetic in Flannery O’Connor’s ‘The Displaced Person.’” Flannery O’Connor Review, Volume 17 (August 2019)

Global South

  • Lund, Joshua and Anne Garland Mahler. “Men with Guns: Cultures of Paramilitarism and the Modern Americas.” The Global South, vol. 12 no. 2, 2018, p. 1-27.
  • Seigel, Micol. “On the Critique of Paramilitarism.” The Global South, vol. 12 no. 2, 2018, p. 166-183.

Journal of African American Studies

  • Alzoubi, M.F.I. “Black Boy Revisited: Richard Wright’s Harbingers of Transracial Worldview.” Journal of African American Studies 23.3 (2019): 178–186.
  • Boyd, Robert L. “Southern Black Metropolis: Position, Place, and Population Below the Mason-Dixon Line.” Journal of African American Studies 23.3 (2019): 256–272. 
  • Brown, A. “African American Enslavement, Speech Act Theory, and the Law.” Journal of African American Studies 23.3 (2019): 162–177. 
  • López, Antonio R. “‘We Know What the Pigs Don’t Like’: The Formation and Solidarity of the Original Rainbow Coalition.” Journal of African American Studies 23.4 (2019): 476–518. 
  • Middlebrook, J.A. “Organizing a Rainbow Coalition of Revolutionary Solidarity.” Journal of African American Studies 23.4 (2019): 405–434. 
  • Shinault, Carley, and Richard Seltzer. “Whose Turf, Whose Town? Race, Status, and Attitudes of Washington DC Residents Toward Gentrification.” Journal of African American Studies 23.1-2 (2019): 72–91.
  • Tajizadehkan, M., and P. Ghasemi. “Cultural Identity in Black Subjects: The Emergence of New Black Subjects in Beloved.” Journal of African American Studies 23.3 (2019): 217–232.
  • Wilson, Anndretta. “Preserving Sacred Space: Mahalia Jackson’s Transnational Song Labor During the Era of Decolonization.” Journal of African American Studies 23.1-2 (2019): 34–51.

Journal of American Studies

  • Cahill, Patricia A. “Adrienne Herndon’s Homeplaces: Shakespeare and Black Resistance in Atlanta, c.1906.” Journal of American Studies, Volume 54, Number 1 (February 2020), pp. 51-58.
  • Dubey, Madhu. “Counterfactual Narratives of the Civil War and Slavery.” Journal of American Studies, Volume 53, Number 3 (August 2019), pp. 589-612.
  • Kuhn, Joseph. “Flesh and the Common Man: Robert Penn Warren’s Huey Long Drama.” Journal of American Studies, Volume 53, Number 4 (November 2019), pp. 953-971.
  • Maxwell, Lynn. “‘Shakespeare for All Times and Peoples:’ Shakespeare at Spelman College and the Atlanta University Center.” Journal of American Studies, Volume 54, Number 1 (February 2020), pp. 66-73.
  • Scofield, Rebecca. “Violence and Social Salvation at the Texas Prison Rodeo.” Journal of American Studies, Volume 54, Number 1 (February 2020), pp. 105-130.
  • Weiss, Jana. “Remember, Celebrate, and Forget? The Martin Luther King Day and the Pitfalls of Civil Religion.” Journal of American Studies, Volume 53, Number 2 (May 2019), pp. 428-448.

Journal of Global Slavery

  • Lowe, John Wharton. “Rememoration or Commemoration?  Transatlantic Negotiations of Racial and Cultural History.”  Journal of Global Slavery 4 (2019): 99-108.

MELUS

  • Bares, Annie. “‘Each Unbearable Day’: Narrative Ruthlessness and Environmental and Reproductive Injustice in Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 44 no. 3, 2019, p. 21-40. 
  • Gradert, Kenyon. “The Mayflower and the Slave Ship: Pilgrim-Puritan Origins in the Antebellum Black Imagination.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 44 no. 3, 2019, p. 63-90. 
  • Killebrew, Zachary. “‘A Poor, Washed Out, Pale Creature’: Passing, Dracula, and the Jazz Age Vampire.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 44 no. 3, 2019, p. 112-128.
  • Lewis, Christopher S. “Speculating on Jim Crow Queerness in African American Lesbian and Gay Life Writing.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 44 no. 2, 2019, p. 153-172. 
  • Li, Stephanie. “Genre Trouble and History’s Miseries in Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 44 no. 2, 2019, p. 1-23. 
  • Pinto, Samantha and Jewel Pereyra. “The Wake and the Work of Culture: Memorialization Practices in Post-Katrina Black Feminist Poetics.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 44 no. 3, 2019, p. 1-20.
  • Rutter, Emily Ruth. “The Creative Recuperation of ‘Blind Tom’ Wiggins in Tyehimba Jess’s Olio and Jeffery Renard Allen’s Song of the Shank.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 44 no. 3, 2019, p. 175-196.
  • Stevens, Erica. “Alice Dunbar-Nelson’s Charm Aesthetics and the Bugbear of Social Equality.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 44 no. 3, 2019, p. 129-154. 
  • Winstein-Hibbs, Sarah. “A Critical Regionalist Reading of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao: Rethinking Magical Realism through Afro-Caribbean Oral Narrative.” MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S., vol. 44 no. 2, 2019, p. 24-43. 

Mississippi Quarterly

  • Berliner, Jonathan. “From Ivory to Foolscap: Faulkner’s Romance of Writing Materials.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 2, Spring2017/2018 2017, pp. 135–146.
  • Choiński, Michaeł, et al. “Harper Lee and Other People: A Stylometric Diagnosis.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 3, Summer2017/2018, pp. 355–374.
  • Eaton, Karly. “Mockingbird, Watchman, and the Adolescent.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 3, Summer2017/2018, pp. 335–354.
  • Ford, Sarah Gilbreath. “Claiming the Property of History in Natasha Trethewey’s Native Guard.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 3, Summer2017/2018, pp. 251–270.
  • Forsyth, Vikki. “Representing Othello in 1890s New Orleans: The Myth of Chivalry in the South.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 1, Winter2017/2018, pp. 3–21. 
  • Frye, Katie. “A ‘Silver Bullet Ready to Drop into Her Brain’: The Crisis of White Motherhood in Flannery O’Connor’s ‘Greenleaf,’ ‘The Enduring Chill,’ and ‘Everything That Rises Must Converge.’” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 2, Spring2017/2018, pp. 147–162. 
  • Gilmore, Garrett Bridger. “Refracting Blackness: Slavery and Fitzgerald’s Historical Consciousness.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 2, Spring2017/2018, pp. 181–203.
  • Marutani, Atsushi. “The Aesthetics and Morality of the ‘Natural’ in Eudora Welty’s Delta Wedding.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 2, Spring2017/2018, pp. 205–223.
  • Mellette, Justin. “‘It Aint Nothing but Jest Another Snopes’: White Trash in Faulkner’s Snopes Trilogy.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 1, Winter2017/2018, pp. 41–60. 
  • Murayama, Kiyohiko. “Lynching as an American Tragedy in Theodore Dreiser.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 2, Spring2017/2018, pp. 163–179.
  • Ploskonka, Mitch. “Apex to Aberrant: Disability in Larry Brown’s Dirty Work.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 3, Summer2017/2018, pp. 319–334.
  • Pond, Julia. “No One Likes to Feel Like an Adolescent: Genre Resistance in Harper Lee’s Novels.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 1, Winter2017/2018, pp. 81–103.
  • Solomon, Eric E. “‘The Vintage’ Faulkner: Imagining Futurity in the Degenerate South of Charlotte Perkins Gilman.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 3, Summer2017/2018, pp. 295–317.
  • Spencer, Matthew Loyd. “‘The Human Filth, the Human Hope’: Subjectivity and the Abject in Robert Penn Warren’s Audubon.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 1, Winter2017/2018, pp. 25–40. 
  • Taylor-Wiseman, Rebekah. “Reading Cane in the Anthropocene: Toomer on Race, Power, and Nature.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 3, Summer2017/2018, pp. 271–293. 
  • Waggoner, Kassia. “Embodied Listening: Singer as Feminist Listener in The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 1, Winter2017/2018, pp. 61–80.
  • Wilson, Laura. “‘Giving Voice to the Tireless Relish of Life’: Listening for the Plantation in Eudora Welty’s Delta Wedding and Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park.” Mississippi Quarterly, vol. 70/71, no. 1, Winter2017/2018, pp. 105–123.

Modern Fiction Studies

  • Fujie, Kristin. “”Through a Piece of Colored Glass”: Faulkner, Race, and Mediation.” MFS Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 65 no. 3, 2019, p. 411-438.

Native South

  • Anderson, Eric Gary and Melanie Benson Taylor. “Introduction: Why Native Southern Literatures Matter.” Native South, vol. 12, 2019, p. 3-9.
  • Anderson, Eric Gary and Melanie Benson Taylor. “Letting the Other Story Go: The Native South in and beyond the Anthropocene.” Native South, vol. 12, 2019, p. 74-98.
  • Byars-Nichols, Keely. “Indigenous through One’s Southernness: Reading Native Southern Literature.” Native South, vol. 12, 2019, p. 10-29.
  • Caison, Gina. “Imagining Possibility within Policy: LeAnne Howe’s Shell Shaker and Louis Owens’s Bone Game.” Native South, vol. 12, 2019, p. 30-51.
  • “Notes from the Field—Yum Cháak (Sacred Rain) and ‘The Little Droplet of Water’.” Native South, vol. 12, 2019, p. 99-106. 96
  • Spiers, Miriam Brown. “‘The Yellow Monster’: Reanimating Nuclear Fears in Cherokee Science Fiction.” Native South, vol. 12, 2019, p. 52-73.

New Literary History

  • Flores-Silva, Dolores with Keith Cartwright. “Fabula,” New Literary History 50.3 (2019): 387-91. Special Issue, “In Brief” edited by Irina Dumitrescu and Bruce Holsinger.

North Carolina Literary Review

  • Allen, Francine L. “‘Let Them Be Black and Beautiful’: A Black Southerner’s Grasp at Self-Respect in C. Eric Lincoln’s The Avenue, Clayton City.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 80–91.
  • Burge, Ashley. “Disembodied Intimacies and Shadows of True Womanhood.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 116–133. 
  • Cory, Jessica. “‘Wildness was Nothing to Admire’: African American Environmental Thought and the Importance of Place in Stephanie Powell Watts’s No One Is Coming to Save Us.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 19–31.
  • Duncan, Rebecca. “A Literary Scholar and a Surrogate Granddaughter: Contemplate the Life and Work of Zoe Kincaid Brockman.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 156–167.
  • Harding, Jennifer. “Looking for Charles.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 92–103.
  • Hawkes, DeLisa D. and Maia L. Butler. “Leaving Home to Return Home: Writing North Carolina Homeplace from the Particular to the Universal.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 6–18.
  • Horn, Patrick E. “The Literary Friendship of George Moses Horton and Caroline Lee Hentz.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 134–143.
  • Hovis, George. “A Visitation with Randall Kenan.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 62–78. 
  • Sarasohn, Lisa. “Glenis Redmond: Poet, Teaching Artist, Griot.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 44–57.
  • Werking Poling, Nancy. “Lies Leander’s.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 178–182.
  • Williams, Justin. “‘The Verses from Our Pen to Him Belong:’ National Identity in the Political Homages of George Moses Horton.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 28, Jan. 2019, pp. 144–153.

NOVEL

  • Feldman, Ezra Dan. “The Describer’s Nightmare: Touching Form in Colson Whitehead’s John Henry Days.” Novel 1 November 2019; 52 (3): 442–459.
  • Im, Seo Hee. “The Ghost in the Account Book: Conrad, Faulkner, and Gothic Incalculability.” Novel, 1 August 2019; 52 (2): 219–239.
  • Zhang, Y. P. “The Emergence of the Global South Novel: Red SorghumPrésence Africaine, and the Third Novelists’ International.” Novel, 1 November 2019; 52 (3): 347–368.

Poe Studies

  • Duffy, Caitlin. “Sensory Overload and Poe’s Mechanics of Terror.” Poe Studies, vol. 52, 2019, p. 69-90.
  • Elmer, Jonathan. “Peirce, Poe, and Protoplasm.” Poe Studies, vol. 52, 2019, p. 29-49.
  • Ginsberg, Lesley. “Feeling in Poe’s Letters.” Poe Studies, vol. 52, 2019, p. 50-68.
  • Luck, Chad. “Poe’s “Berenice” and the Aesthetic of the Interesting.” Poe Studies, vol. 52, 2019, p. 9-28. 
  • Ostrowski, Carl. “”Mere Formula—Nothing More”: The Poetics of Profanity in “Never Bet the Devil Your Head”.” Poe Studies, vol. 52, 2019, p. 113-132. 
  • Weinstock, Jeffrey Andrew. “Before the After: Anticipatory Anxiety and Experience Claimed in Poe’s Angelic Dialogues.” Poe Studies, vol. 52, 2019, p. 91-109. 
  • Weiser, Karen. “Poetry in Reason: The Scientific Poems of Edgar Allan Poe and Erasmus Darwin.” Poe Studies, vol. 52, 2019, p. 133-148.

South: A Scholarly Journal

  • Blackford, Holly. “Unattached Women Raising Cain: Spinsters Touching Orphans in Anne of Green Gables and Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” South: A Scholarly Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, Fall 2018, pp. 36–53. 
  • Carson, Joseph T. “Southern Floods and Reproduction on the Roof: Tennessee Williams’s Kingdom of Earth and Quare Ecology.” South: A Scholarly Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, Fall 2018, pp. 54–72. 
  • Crank, James A. “The Queer Silences of Jim Grimsley’s Winter Birds.” South: A Scholarly Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, Fall 2018, pp. 73–88.
  • Edmonds, Brittney Michelle. “On Witnessing: James Baldwin’s Southern Experience and the Quareness of Black Sociality.” South: A Scholarly Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, Fall 2018, pp. 115–134.
  • Henninger, Katherine. “The Project of Quaring Childhood.” South: A Scholarly Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, Fall 2018, pp. 5–15. 
  • Lewis, Janaka Bowman. “Building the Worlds of Our Dreams: Black Girlhood and Quare Narratives in African American Literature.” South: A Scholarly Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, Fall 2018, pp. 96–114. 
  • Morris, Calvin Marquis. “Once upon a Time…” South: A Scholarly Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, Fall 2018, pp. 93–95.
  • Solomon, Eric. “Boys Erased and the Trouble with Coaching: Confronting Male-Male Sexual Violence in the Age of #Metoo.” South: A Scholarly Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, Fall 2018, pp. 135–155.
  • Wilson, L. Lamar. “Birthing America’s Kweer: Motherless Children Preach the Gospel of Mercy.” South: A Scholarly Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, Fall 2018, pp. 16–35. 

South Atlantic Review

  • Winter, Cameron Lee. “I ain’t got no use for none of that’: Contemporary Christian Kitsch and Iconography in Flannery O’Connor’s ‘Parker’s Back.” South Atlantic Review, vol. 84, no. 2-3, 2019, pp.

South Carolina Review

  • Borders, Amy. “Holy Fire: Shobha Rao’s Girls Burn Brighter.” South Carolina Review, vol. 51, no. 2, Spring 2019, pp. 178–182. 
  • Hunter, Walt. “Inventing Appalachia: Meredith McCarroll’s Unwhite: Appalachia, Race, and Film.” South Carolina Review, vol. 51, no. 2, Spring 2019, pp. 183–186. 
  • Tekulve, Susan. “The Dark Heart of Florida: Jon Sealy’s The Edge of America.” South Carolina Review, vol. 52, no. 1, Fall 2019, pp. 117–119. 

Southern Cultures

  • Cox, Karen L. “The Grey Gardens of the South.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 4, 2019, p. 98-107.
  • Greene, Alison Collis. “Reckoning with Southern Baptist Histories.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 3, 2019, p. 46-67.
  • Hudson, Angela Pulley. “Unsettling Histories of the South.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 3, 2019, p. 30-45.
  • Kelly, Sonny. “The Talk: Crucial Conversations for Contemporary Kids of Color in the New South.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 3, 2019, p. 76-89.
  • Knighton, Mary A. “Strange Fruit and Patriotic Flowers: E. McKnight Kauffer’s Illustrated South.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 4, 2019, p. 54-81.
  • Lowery, Malinda Maynor. “The Original Southerners: American Indians, the Civil War, and Confederate Memory.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 4, 2019, p. 16-35.
  • Macaulay, Alex. “Going Up and Coming Down Kris Kristofferson, Authenticity, and Country Music’s ‘New Breed’.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 2, 2019, p. 78-103.
  • Mathews, Burgin. “Jazz and the Magic City: An Alabama Diaspora.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 4, 2019, p. 108-127.
  • Orr, Terrell. “‘Now We Work Just as One’: The United Farm Workers in Florida Citrus, 1972–1977.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 4, 2019, p. 140-157. 
  • Roberts, Diane. “The Great-Granddaddy of White Nationalism.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 3, 2019, p. 133-155.
  • Stevenson, Peter, et al. “Curers, Charms, and Curses Meddygon, Swynion, a Melltithion: Celebrating the Shared Folk Cultures of Appalachia and Wales.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 4, 2019, p. 82-97.
  • Terenzio, Olivia Ware. “Feijoada and Hoppin’ John: Dishing the African Diaspora in Brazil and the United States.” Southern Cultures, vol. 25 no. 4, 2019, p. 158-175.

Southern Quarterly

  • Bell, Travis R., et al. “‘It Just Means More?’: Depiction of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) in ESPN Signing Day Coverage (2015-2018).” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 3, 2019, p. 48-68.
  • Carvalho, John and Daisa Baker. “Taming the Monster: The 1929 Carnegie Report on College Athletics.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 3, 2019, p. 69-82.
  • Crawford, Cameron Williams. “”Where Everything Else Is Starving, Fighting, Struggling”: Food and the Politics of Hurricane Katrina in Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 73-84. 
  • Davis, David A. “A Good Mayonnaise is Hard to Find: Flannery O’Connor and Culinary Codependency.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 29-41.
  • Evans, Amy C. “My Houston: Documenting My Hometown Through Art and Oral History.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 86-95.
  • Haygood, Daniel Marshall. “Spreading the Gospel of Hoops: How Television Helped Make Atlantic Coast Conference Basketball a Cultural Fixture in the South.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 3, 2019, p. 28-47.
  • Hendricks, Nicole and Mary Lou Sheffer. “Sullivan vs. Kilrain: Mississippi’s Legendary Boxing Match.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 3, 2019, p. 94-105.
  • Jovanovich, Monica E. “Traveling Through Time: The Art and Architecture of the New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 2, 2019, p. 22-44.
  • Lake, Elise S. “‘Survival is Triumph Enough’—or Is It? Hunger and the Paradox of Plenty in the Modern South of Harry Crews.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 56-72.
  • Lightweis-Goff, Jennie. “Lean Times in Boom Towns: #FoodGentrification at the Mouth of the Mississippi.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 2, 2019, p. 45-61.
  • Miles, Christopher. “A Crawfish Odyssey: Procambarus Clarkii as an Emerging Food Source in Southern Spain.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 130-146.
  • Nooe, F. Evan. “Southern Food in an ‘Imagineered’ World: Constructing Locality in the Hyperreality of Walt Disney World’s Disney Springs.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 96-117.
  • Passidomo, Catarina. “Southern Foodways in the Classroom and Beyond.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 12-28.
  • Serafini, Sidonia. “Black, White, and Native: The Multiracial Writing Community of Hampton Institute’s Southern Workman.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 2, 2019, p. 63-81.
  • Slepov, Eugene. “‘Singularities of Time and Place’: A Study of Nativity as Ethnicity in A Confederacy of Dunces.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 2, 2019, p. 8-21. 
  • Tippen, Carrie Helms. “‘It’s Southern, but More’: Southern Citizenship in the Global Foodscape of Garden & Gun.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 147-163.
  • Torres-Zúñiga, Laura. “Of (Un)Satisfactory Dinners: The Discourse of Food in Tennessee Williams’s Work.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 42-55.
  • Tubbs, Willie R., et al. “The Life and Service of Zeke Bonura in the American Media.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 3, 2019, p. 10-27.
  • Venable, Jennifer A. “Cajun Identity Through Food: Between the Exotic ‘Other’ and the White Culinary Imaginary.” The Southern Quarterly, vol. 56 no. 1, 2018, p. 118-129.

Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South

  • Carmack, Margaret Williams. “Segregating the Police:  Race and the Reality of Being a Black Police Officer in Postwar Memphis.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 26, Number 1 Spring/Summer 2019.
  • Cowan, William Tynes. “Stonewall Jackson’s Widow and The Long Roll by Mary Johnston:  ‘Surely an Equestrian Statue.’” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 26, Number 1 Spring/Summer 2019.
  • DePuydt, Peter J. “‘The Little Plot’:  Jacob Green and the 1814 Fredericktown Insurrection.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 26, Number 2 Fall/Winter 2019.
  • Dollar, Charles M. “Claude Ramsay:  A Visionary Catalyst for Social and Political Change in Mississippi, 1916-1986.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 26, Number 2 Fall/Winter 2019.
  • Graham, Dan. “Will the Real Laureate of the Confederacy Please Stand Up?: Henry Timrod and the Counter Memory of the Lost Cause.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 26, Number 1 Spring/Summer 2019.
  • Neumann, Brian. “‘A Truer Type of Womanhood’:  A Case Study of Southern Collegiate Coeducation, 1893-1900.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 26, Number 2 Fall/Winter 2019.
  • Stephens, Mary. “The Undead Past:  The Romantic South in Robert Kirkman’s The Walking Dead.” Southern Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the South, vol. 26, Number 1 Spring/Summer 2019.

Study the South

  • Garner, Betsie. “All are Welcome? Southern Hospitality and the Politics of Belonging.” Study the South. 20 November 2019.
  • Payne, Sarah. “Through the Words of Those who Experienced it: Reading the Whitney Plantation Alongside Neoslave Narratives.” Study the South. 20 November 2019.
  • Smith, Bobby J. II. “Mississippi’s War Against the War on Poverty: Food Power, Hunger, and White Supremacy.” Study the South. 1 July 2019.

Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal

  • Avilez, GerShun. “‘Black Regions, Queer Territories.’” Women’s Studies, vol. 48, no. 6, Sept. 2019, pp. 605–609. 
  • Avilez, GerShun. “Introduction: Race, Gender, and Freedom: The Critical Contributions of Thadious M. Davis.” Women’s Studies, vol. 48, no. 6, Sept. 2019, pp. 581–586.
  • Donaldson, Susan V. “Flipping the Script: Thadious Davis’s Reconstruction of William Faulkner and the South.” Women’s Studies, vol. 48, no. 6, Sept. 2019, pp. 587–592.
  • Lowe, John Wharton. “Tribute” [to Thadious Davis].  Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal. August 29, 2019.
  • Sullivan, Mecca Jamilah. “Practices of Imagination: Learning from the Vision of Thadious Davis.” Women’s Studies, vol. 48, no. 6, Sept. 2019, pp. 593–599.

Xavier Review

  • Adamo, Ralph. “Editor’s Note,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. p. v.
  • Bonner, Jr., Thomas (guest ed.), “Forward,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp.8-9.
  • Bryan, Rachel. “‘Sitting There Crying Hungry’: Subsistence Economies in Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing, Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2.pp. 130-139.
  • Doble, Jessica. “Hope in the Apocalypse: Narrative Perspective as Negotiation of Structural Crises in Salvage the Bones,” pp. 51-61.
  • Flores-Silva, Dolores and Keith Cartwright, “The Scaly Bird Sings Remember Me’: Gulf Fiestas of the Dead and Tribalography in Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing,”Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp. 140-154.
  • Harris, Trudier. “Aborted Rituals of Communion: Food as Drugs and Drugs as Food in Jesmyn Ward’s Where the Line Bleeds,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp. 34-50.
  • Jett, Nova. “Men We Reaped as Testimonio,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. 95-108.
  • Lienard-Yeterian, Marie. “Review of Sing, Unburied, Sing,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp.164-166.
  • Mitchell, Keith. “‘Bodies Tell Stories,’ Between the Human and the Animal in Salvage the Bones,”Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp. 62-84.
  • Morris, David Robinson. “Review of Where the Line Bleeds.”Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp.155-158 
  • Railsback, Brian. “”Somewhere Over Emerson’s Rainbow: Jesmyn Ward’s Terrifying Environmental Vision,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp. 18-33.
  • Rea, Robert. “Review of Salvage the Bones,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp.159-160.
  • Ryer, James. “Review of The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks of Race,”Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp.167-169.
  • Teel, Cherylon. “Review of Men We Reaped,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp.161-163.
  • Tuman, Jeremy. “Unforeseeable: Student Engagement with Salvage the Bones,”Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp.124-129.
  • Vander, Robin G. (guest ed.), “Afterword,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp. 170-172. 
  • Ward, Jesmyn. “Prologue to Men We Reaped,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp.10-15.
  • Washington, Sondra Bickham. “‘Who Will Deliver Me?’: Black Girlhood in a Man’s World in Salvage the Bones,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp. 85-94
  • Whiteside, Briana. “‘He Wanted More for Himself, But He Didn’t Know How to Get It’: Notions of Masculinity in a Maximum-Security Prison,” Xavier Review, Vol. 38 (Fall 2018), No.2. pp. 109-123.

Academic Presses:

Bloomsbury

  • Crank, James A. and K. Merinda Simmons. Race and New Modernisms. Bloomsbury Academic, 2019.

Cambridge UP

  • Bird, John. Mark Twain in Context. Cambridge University Press, 2020.
  • Frye, Steven. Cormac McCarthy in Context. Cambridge University Press, 2020.
  • Taylor, Melanie Benson. The Indian in American Southern Literature. Cambridge University Press, 2020.

Duke UP

  • Drake, Simon C. and Dwan K Henderson, editors. Are You Entertained? Black Popular Culture in the Twenty-First Century. Duke University Press, 2020.
  • Kelsey, Penelope and Leila Gómez Indigenous Narratives of Territory and Creation: Hemispheric Perspective. Duke University Press, 2020.
  • King, Tiffany Lethabo, Jenell Navarro and Andrea Smith, editors. Otherwise Worlds: Against Settler Colonialism and Anti-Blackness. Duke University Press, 2020.
  • Szwed, John. Space Is the Place: The Lives and Times of Sun Ra. Duke University Press, 2020.

Lexington Books

  • Flores-Silva, Dolores with  Keith Cartwright. “Feeding the Gulf Dead: An Ofrenda of Response to Brenda Marie Osbey’s All Saints and All Souls.Summoning Our Saints: The Poetry and Prose of Brenda Marie Osbey, edited by John Lowe.  Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books, 2019: 135-149
  • Lowe, John Wharton, editor. Summoning Our Saints: The Poetry and Prose of Brenda Marie Osbey. Lexington Books, 2019.
  • Lowe, John Wharton. “Mapping a Starry Poetics: The Achievement of Brenda Marie Osbey” and “The Origins of Osbey’s Poetics: The Achievement of Ceremony for Minneconjoux and In These Houses.”  Summoning Our Saints: The Poetry and Prose of Brenda Marie Osbey.  Ed. John Wharton Lowe.  Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2019.  1-20; 21-36.  

Louisiana State UP

  • Bever, Megan L., Lesley J. Gordon, And Laura Mammina, editors. American Discord: The Republic and Its People in the Civil War Era. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Brian Matthew Jordan And Evan C. Rothera, editors. The War Went On: Reconsidering the Lives of Civil War Veterans. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Campanella, Richard. The West Bank of Greater New Orleans: A Historical Geography. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Choinsk, Michał. Southern Hyperboles: Metafigurative Strategies of Narration. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Clark, Keith. Navigating the Fiction of Ernest J. Gaines: A Roadmap for Readers. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Daniels-Rauterkus, Melissa. Afro-Realisms and the Romances of Race: Rethinking Blackness in the African American Novel. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Friend, Craig Thompson and Lorri Glover, editors. Reinterpreting Southern Histories Essays in Historiography. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Jackson, Jessica Barbata. Dixie’s Italians: Sicilians, Race, and Citizenship in the Jim Crow Gulf South. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Key, Barclay. Race and Restoration: Churches of Christ and the Black Freedom Struggle. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Leahy, Christopher J. President without a Party: The Life of John Tyler. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Lewis, Michael and Richard F. Hamm, editors. Prohibition’s Greatest Myths: The Distilled Truth about America’s Anti-Alcohol Crusade. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Mandelman, Adam. The Place with No Edge: An Intimate History of People, Technology, and the Mississippi River Delta. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Mcilhenny, Ryan C. To Preach Deliverance to the Captives: Freedom and Slavery in the Protestant Mind of George Bourne, 1780–1845. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Milteer, Warren Eugene, Jr. North Carolina’s Free People of Color, 1715–1885. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Picken, Conor and Matthew Dischinger, editors. Southern Comforts: Drinking and the U.S. South. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Roessner, Amber. Jimmy Carter and the Birth of the Marathon Media Campaign. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Shiffle, Joan Romano. Warren, Jarrell, and Lowell: Collaboration in the Reshaping of American Poetry. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Squint, Kirstin L., Eric Gary Anderson, Taylor Hagood, And Anthony Wilson, editors. Swamp Souths: Literary and Cultural Ecologies. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Stewart,Anthony. Approximate Gestures: Infinite Spaces in the Fiction of Percival Everett. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.
  • Tomko, Gene Encyclopedia of Louisiana Musicians: Jazz, Blues, Cajun, Creole, Zydeco, Swamp Pop, and Gospel. Louisiana State University Press, 2020.

 Mercer University Press

  • Curry, Carolyn Newton. Suffer and Grow Strong: The Life of Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas, 1834–1907. Mercer University Press, 2020.
  • Fisher, Garry D. and Zack C. Waters. The Damnedest Set of Fellows: A History of Georgia’s Cherokee Artillery. Mercer University Press, 2020.
  • Graham-Bertolini, Alison and Casey Kayser, editors. Understanding the Short Fiction of Carson McCullers. Mercer University Press, 2020.
  • Reiniche, Ruth. Sign Language: Reading Flannery O’Connor’s Graphic Narrative. Mercer University Press, 2020.
  • Roberts, W. Clifford, Jr. and Frank E. Clark Atlanta’s Fighting Forty-Second: Joseph Johnston’s “Old Guard . Mercer University Press, 2020.  
  • Whitt, Jan. Untold Stories, Unheard Voices, Truman Capote and In Cold Blood. Mercer University Press, 2019.

Modern Language Association

  • Donahoo, Robert and Marshall Bruce Gentry, editors. Approaches to Teaching Flannery O’Connor​. Modern Language Association, 2019.
  • Lowe, John Wharton and Herman Beavers, editors.  Approaches to Teaching Gaines’s The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman and Other Works. New York: Modern Language Association, 2019.
  • Lowe, John Wharton. “Humor and Folk Culture in The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman” and “A Lesson Before Dying and the Culture of Surveillance.” Approaches to Teaching Gaines’s The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman and Other Works.  Ed. John Wharton Lowe and  Herman Beavers.  New York: Modern Language Association, 2019. 56-65; 178-193.

Ohio UP

  • Engelhardt, Elizabeth S. D. with Lora E. Smith, editors. The Food We Eat, the Stories We Tell: Contemporary Appalachian Tables. Ohio UP, 2019.
  • Morrone, Michele. Ailing in Place Environmental Inequities and Health Disparities in Appalachia. Ohio UP, 2020.

Ohio State UP

  • Eisenfeld, Sue. Wandering Dixie: Dispatches from the Lost Jewish South. Ohio UP, 2020.
  • Soto-Crespo, Ramón E. The White Trash Menace and Hemispheric Fiction. Ohio UP, 2020.

Oxford UP

  • Foster, Travis M. Genre and White Supremacy in the Postemancipation United States. Oxford UP, 2020.
  • Holbo, Christine. Legal Realisms: The American Novel under Reconstruction. Oxford UP, 2020.
  • Sinykin, Dan. American Literature and the Long Downturn: Neoliberal Apocalypse. Oxford UP, 2020.
  • Watson, Jay. William Faulkner and the Faces of Modernity. Oxford UP, 2020.

Routledge

  • Dix, Andrew and Peter Templeton, editors. Violence from Slavery to #BlackLivesMatter: African American History and Representation. Routledge, 2019.
  • Honeini, Ahmed. William Faulkner and Mortality: A Fine Dead Sound. Routledge, 2021. 

U of Alabama P

  • Gray, D. Ryan. Uprooted: Race, Public Housing, and the Archaeology of Four Lost New Orleans Neighborhoods. The University of Alabama Press, 2019.
  • Hurt, R. Douglas. The Green Revolution in the Global South: Science, Politics, and Unintended Consequences. The University of Alabama Press, 2019.

U of California P

  • Sheppard, Samantha N. Sporting Blackness: Race, Embodiment, and Critical Muscle Memory on Screen. University of California Press, 2020.

U of Georgia P

  • Bolster, Paul. Saving the Georgia Coast: A Political History of the Coastal Marshlands Protection Act. University of Georgia Press, 2020.
  • Bond, Beverly Greene and Susan Eva O’Donovan. Remembering the Memphis Massacre: An American Story. University of Georgia Press, 2020.
  • Earle, Thomas Blake and D. Andrew Johnson. Atlantic Environments and the American South. University of Georgia Press, 2020.
  • Falls, Susan and Jessica R. Smith. Overshot: The Political Aesthetics of Woven Textiles from the Antebellum South and Beyond. University of Georgia Press, 2020.
  • Martin, Anthony J. Tracking the Golden Isles: The Natural and Human Histories of the Georgia Coast. University of Georgia Press, 2020.
  • Matthews, John T. Hidden in Plain Sight: Slave Capitalism in Poe, Hawthorne, and Joel Chandler Harris. University of Georgia Press, 2020.
  • Pugh, Tison, editor. Queering the South on Screen. University of Georgia Press, 2020.
  • Robbins, Hollis. Forms of Contention: Influence and the African American Sonnet Tradition. University of Georgia Press, 2020.
  • Schlotterbeck, John T. Daily Life in the Colonial South. University of Georgia Press, 2020.

U of Illinois P

  • Vander Wel, Stephanie. Hillbilly Maidens, Okies, and Cowgirls: Women’s Country Music, 1930-1960. University of Illinois Press, 2020.
  • West, E. James. Ebony Magazine and Lerone Bennett Jr.: Popular Black History in Postwar America. University of Illinois Press, 2020.

U of Minnesota P

  • Klein, Lauren F. An Archive of Taste: Race and Eating in the Early United States. University of Minnesota Press, 2020.

U of North Carolina P

  • Bellows, Amanda Brickell. American Slavery and Russian Serfdom in the Post-Emancipation Imagination.University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Browning, Judkin and Timothy Silver. An Environmental History of the Civil War. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Carico, Aaron. Black Market: The Slave’s Value in National Culture after 1865. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Chase, Robert T. We Are Not Slaves: State Violence, Coerced Labor, and Prisoners’ Rights in Postwar America. University of North Carolina Press, 2019.
  • Darity, William A. Jr. and A. Kirsten Mullen. From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Fry, Zachery A. A Republic in the Ranks: Loyalty and Dissent in the Army of the Potomac. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Gomer, Justin. White Balance: How Hollywood Shaped Colorblind Ideology and Undermined Civil Rights. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Hale, Grace Elizabeth. Cool Town: How Athens, Georgia, Launched Alternative Music and Changed American Culture. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Ingram, Jessica. Road Through Midnight: A Civil Rights Memorial. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Luskey, Brian P. Men Is Cheap: Exposing the Frauds of Free Labor in Civil War America. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • McIlvenna, Noeleen. Early American Rebels: Pursuing Democracy from Maryland to Carolina, 1640–1700. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Onaci, Edward. Free the Land: The Republic of New Afrika and the Pursuit of a Black Nation-State. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Quraishi, Uzma. Redefining the Immigrant South: Indian and Pakistani Immigration to Houston during the Cold War.University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Snider, Jill D. Lucean Arthur Headen: The Making of a Black Inventor and Entrepreneur. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Turner, Nicole Myers. Soul Liberty: The Evolution of Black Religious Politics in Postemancipation Virginia. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Tyson, Timothy B. Radio Free Dixie, Second Edition: Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Whitlinger, Claire. Between Remembrance and Repair: Commemorating Racial Violence in Philadelphia, Mississippi.University of North Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Woods, Michael E. Arguing until Doomsday: Stephen Douglas, Jefferson Davis, and the Struggle for American Democracy. University of North Carolina Press, 2020.

U of South Carolina P

  • Mccrady, James Waring and C. L. Bragg. Patriots in Exile: Charleston Rebels in St. Augustine during the American Revolution. University of South Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Moore, Geneva Cobb. Bodily Evidence: Racism, Slavery, and Maternal Power in the Novels of Toni Morrison. University of South Carolina Press, 2020.
  • O’Rourke, Sean Patrick and Lesli K. Pace, editor. Like Wildfire: The Rhetoric of the Civil Rights Sit-Ins. University of South Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Smith, Mark M., editor. Stono: Documenting and Interpreting a Southern Slave Revolt. University of South Carolina Press, 2020.
  • Steel, Lewis M. with Beau Friedlander. The Butler’s Chil: White Privilege, Race, and a Lawyer’s Life in Civil Rights. University of South Carolina Press, 2020.

U of Tennessee P

  • Edward R. Crowther, editor. The Enduring Lost Cause: Afterlives of a Redeemer Nation. University of Tennessee Press, 2020.
  • Reutter, Cheli and Jonathan S. Cullick. Mockingbird Grows Up: Re-Reading Harper Lee since Watchman. University of Tennessee Press, 2020.
  • Sobol, Joseph. Liars, Damn Liars, and Storytellers: Essays on Traditional and Contemporary Storytelling. University of Tennessee Press, 2020.
  • Wicks, Stephen C., editors. Beauford Delaney and James Baldwin: Through the Unusual Door. University of Tennessee Press, 2020.

U of Virginia P

  • Brettle, Adrian. Colossal Ambitions: Confederate Planning for a Post–Civil War World. University of Virginia Press, 2020.
  • Domby, Adam H. The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory. University of Virginia Press, 2020.
  • Gamble, Harry Y. God on the Grounds: A History of Religion at Thomas Jefferson’s University. University of Virginia Press, 2020.
  • Rambsy, Howard, II. Bad Men: Creative Touchstones of Black Writers. University of Virginia Press, 2020.
  • Rice, Douglas. Lighting the Way: Federal Courts, Civil Rights, and Public Policy. University of Virginia Press, 2020.
  • Rollyson, Carl. The Life of William Faulkner: The Past Is Never Dead, 1897-1934. University of Virginia Press, 2020.
  • Tarter, Brent. Virginians and Their Histories. University of Virginia Press, 2020.
  • Tucker, Ann L. Newest Born of Nations: European Nationalist Movements and the Making of the Confederacy. University of Virginia Press, 2020.

UP of Florida

  • Huse, Andrew T. From Saloons to Steak Houses: A History of Tampa. University Press of Florida, 2020.
  • Kawai, Ryusuke. Yamato Colony: The Pioneers Who Brought Japan to Florida. University Press of Florida, 2020.
  • Monroe, Gary. The Last Resort: Jewish South Beach, 1977–1986. University Press of Florida, 2020.
  • Waring, Stephen P. NASA and the Long Civil Rights Movement. University Press of Florida, 2019.

UP of Mississippi

  • Brosman, Catharine Savage. Mississippi Poets: A Literary Guide. University Press of Mississippi, 2020.
  • Corrigan, Lisa M. Black Feelings: Race and Affect in the Long Sixties. University Press of Mississippi, 2020.
  • DeBerry, Roy, Aviva Futorian, Stephen Klein, and John Lyons. Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country: The Benton County Civil Rights Movement. University Press of Mississippi, 2020.
  • Dominy, Jordan J. Southern Literature, Cold War Culture, and the Making of Modern America. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Dominy, Jordan J. Southern Literature, Cold War Culture, and the Making of Modern America. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Falck, Susan T. Remembering Dixie: The Battle to Control Historical Memory in Natchez, Mississippi, 1865–1941. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Folwell, Emma J. The War on Poverty in Mississippi: From Massive Resistance to New Conservatism. University Press of Mississippi, 2020.
  • Freedman, Eden Wales. Reading Testimony, Witnessing Trauma: Confronting Race, Gender, and Violence in American Literature. University Press of Mississippi, 2020.
  • Gessler, Anne. Cooperatives in New Orleans: Collective Action and Urban Development. University Press of Mississippi, 2020.
  • Gordon, Phillip. Gay Faulkner: Uncovering a Homosexual Presence in Yoknapatawpha and Beyond. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Hamlet, Janice D., editor. Tyler Perry: Interviews. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Leader-Picone, Cameron. Black and More than Black: African American Fiction in the Post Era. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Lowe, John Wharton. “Red Laughter: Humor in Faulkner’s Native Narratives.” Faulkner and the Native South.  Ed. Jay Watson and Annette Trefzer.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2019.  181-197
  • Marszalek, John F., III. Coming Out of the Magnolia Closet: Same-Sex Couples in Mississippi. University Press of Mississippi, 2020.
  • Ownby, Ted and Becca Walton, editors. Clothing and Fashion in Southern History. University Press of Mississippi, 2020.
  • Pollack, Harriet, editor. New Essays on Eudora Welty, Class, and Race. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Robertson, Sarah. Poverty Politics: Poor Whites in Contemporary Southern Writing. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.
  • Teutsch, Matthew. Rediscovering Frank Yerby: Critical Essays. University Press of Mississippi, 2020.
  • Watson, Veronica, editor. The Short Stories of Frank Yerby. University Press of Mississippi, 2020
  • Woodard, Helena. Slave Sites on Display: Reflecting Slavery’s Legacy Through Contemporary “Flash” Moments. University Press of Mississippi, 2019.

About the Contributors

Amy King is a Lecturer in the Department of English at Auburn University.

Lisa Hinrichsen is Associate Professor of English and Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Arkansas. She is the author of Possessing the Past: Trauma, Imagination, and Memory in Post-Plantation Southern Literature (LSUP, 2015) and co-editor, along with Gina Caison and Stephanie Rountree, Small-Screen Souths: Region, Identity, and the Cultural Politics of Television (LSUP, 2017).

Shari Arnold is a Literary Studies Ph.D. student and Graduate Teaching Assistant at Georgia State University. Her research examines diasporic and rhizomatic connections among women of color in the US South. She is specifically interested in Christina Sharp’s theorizing of “the wake” and how African American women draw from ancestral experience concerning their self-conceptualization. Shari also teaches first-year composition and literary theory at Clark Atlanta University with an emphasis on critical race and third-wave feminist theory.

Joshua Ryan Jackson Joshua Jackson is a Ph.D. student at Georgia State University, where he’s working on a dissertation about US multi-ethnic historical fiction, public monuments, and popular media of the twentieth century.

Gayle Fallon is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English at Louisiana State University. Her work focuses on the communal production of safe spaces for socially deviant individuals in late medieval European literature. She is also interested in linguistics, semiotics, and the digital humanities.

Kelly Vines has served as the MA Representative and the President of the ESO executive council. She now serves as the organization’s Past-President Advisor. She is a PhD Candidate and former Assistant Director of the University Writing Program at Louisiana State University. As a member of the ESO executive council, she is dedicated to providing emerging scholars with the necessary tools to succeed in their professional endeavors, facilitating communication and collaboration between southern studies scholars across our disparate geographies, making the SSSL and southern studies a more welcoming place for emerging scholars, and advocating on behalf of emerging scholars in political realms. She is the recipient of a dissertation fellowship from the American Association of University Women, and she is currently working on her dissertation, “Post-Plantation Entanglements: Bodies, Objects, and Landscapes in U.S. and South African Literature and Culture,” which questions how, why, and to what effect contemporary authors, artists, and tourists move through or re-inhabit plantations in symbolic and material ways. Her work has been published in the North Carolina Literary Review and Mississippi Quarterly. In addition to her more traditional academic work, she also co-produces About South, a podcast about the South: www.aboutsouthpodcast.com.

Will Murray is Postdoctoral Fellow at Baylor University. His work can be found in American Studies, Mississippi Quarterly, Eudora Welty Review, CEA Critic, and the South Carolina Review. He is currently working on a book project exploring how post-1960 narratives (from and about the South) use the region to project and protect white innocence. Will is also a member of the ESO Executive Council, where he serves as Projects Chair.